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You've discovered the equation for constant linear acceleration. This equation is used in situations of uniform acceleration to determine final position and velocity. Essentially you start with your acceleration and integrate with respect to time to get the equation for velocity and integrate that for the equation for position. a = a //Acceleration v = ...


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Although you can use this type of equasions they are quite unhandy. These are derived from intigration where a fragment of time known as delta time or even dt limits to zero. They are most precise but usually unfit for physics engine due to the complexity of finding the time at which the object or projectile will collide. The complexity grows with more ...


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You don't need sophisticated methods to accomplish this if you explained the issue correctly. All you need is the following, d - distance from the ground. s - Current speed, going downwards. g - Acceleration downwards resulting from gravity. a - Acceleration upwards from the engine. When the ship is heading down to the desired landing spot, you can ...


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I've managed to get it working, thanks to @UnholySheep for convincing me that I was on the right track which helped me through some head scratching. Things move smoothly now, and the balls don't stick together either. I've changed my ballBounce() function to return a bool if there is still a collision/overlap so that my main game loop will iterate again, up ...


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First of all, if you want to avoid aliasing problems, you need to respect the Shannon rule. So you need to take 120FPS or more. Secondly, you don't really need to care, you can simulate at 40 if you want, just be sure to linearly interpolate all of your matrices, the frame presentation time is the t, and your physics simulation always have to run some ...


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Creating a such origami simulation is very complicated. In my opinion, to manage to create a such simulation, strong knowledge of geometry and math in general is required. I would advise you to try to approach to this problem from the side of geometry rather than from physics side, because it is totally geometric problem. Adding physics to it (at least at ...


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Regarding your gravitation/acceleration physics, here's your code again with a bit of reformatting: function world.update(t) for k, v in pairs(world.objects) do if v.Static ~= true then v.Position.X = v.Position.X + v.Velocity.X if v.onGround == false then if v.Velocity.Y < world.Gravity then ...


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Your approach is reasonable. A simpler alternative would be to use canned sprite states for each tile, representing various levels of "dug out"-ness of the tile (100% full, 80% full, 50% full, all the way to an empty tile). But it sounds like you want something more dynamic, so you're on the right track. When you implement this kind of technique it's ...


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Apply two forces in opposite directions. The one at the far end of the wing turns it. The other at the hinge - applied to the wing not the body at that point - zeros out the first so the whole craft doesn't move. Note that the far-end force is perpendicular to the line from the hinge to where it is applied. That's not essential, but it won't accomplish ...


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Try adjusting the Max Angular Velocity in the Physics Manager. You can access the Physics Manager by selecting Edit->Project Settings->Physics from the menu bar. The default value is 7. Maybe try a value around 100. That seemed to work well for me. You can override the Project Settings value of Max Angular Velocity for any Rigidbody by scripting ...


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There is a realtime WYSIWYG interpolation editor: http://inloop.github.io/interpolator/



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