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In the context of a highly parallelizable section of execution, like drawing pixels to the screen rendered from a some 3D/2D scene, GPUs are almost always likely to be faster because of their architecture. The decision, in a broad sense, for what programs will execute faster on a GPU vs. CPU should be thought of as how many different execution contexts can ...


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You could use Akka to manage all the concurrency and thread management for you. Or you could use the Play Framework that already builds on Akka and that supports WebSocket quite nicely. With Play you can choose between Java and Scala on the server side.


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Another option may be using a quadtree structure or if you have many moving objects a spatial hashing aproach.


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As described here (last chapter), please check the value of the field renderCalls in your SpriteBatch (you have only one unique SpriteBatch instance right ?), this should tell you the real number of draw calls that the batch has made. If you have more renderCalls than what you would expect then maxSpritesInBatch value is too low or your sprites have ...


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Basically its what @DanielHolst said, you can use negative coords and expand in all directions. As for storing your loaded chunks for fast access and checking you could use std::unordered_map, Just #include <unordered_map>, then your code looks something like this: std::unordered_map< std::pair< int, int >, Chunk* > ChunkMap; // For ...


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I usualy use one main thread (obviously) and I'll add a thread every time I notice a performance drop of about 10 to 20 percent. To loacte such an drop I use visual studio's performance tools. Common events are (un)loading some areas of the map or make some heavy calculations.



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