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-1

power of 2 textures increase performance about 30% for any type of GPU not only old GPUs (30% faster is the difference between a high end GPU and an average one) they take 30% more ram but less vram is needed they increase quality by providing proper texture size for specific distance it works like anti-aliasing for textures dark line artifact should be ...


4

Agner Fog's optimization guides are excellent. He has guides, tables of instruction timings, and docs on the microarchitecture of all recent x86 CPU designs (going back as far as Intel Pentium). See also some other resources linked from http://stackoverflow.com/tags/x86/info Just for fun, I'll answer some of the questions (numbers from recent Intel CPUs). ...


-1

This question falls into the subject of Runtime Analysis. Assignments are, by nature, constant time operations. From a performance standpoint, you generally don't need to worry about constant time operations. Since you asked: Any primitive operation(assignment, logical evaluation, etc) are generally considered to take one flop from a runtime standpoint. ...


2

Those calls aren't free, but they are very fast and usually aren't a problem. When in doubt, check the profiler for performance hotspots. Unless you're making thousands of these calls per frame, they're probably not a big time sink for your game.


2

The best paper out there for performance comparison is from geometrictools according to the paper you need 12 multiplication and 12 addition to convert a quaternion to a matrix, but this is hardly a deciding factor.. you need to look at the bigger picture Quaternions are great for interpolation because they are numerically more stable than matrices when ...


0

You could also not re-invent the wheel and use some already existing library for noise-generation. I recommend libnoise2, which is highly optimized and uses SSE/2/3/4/AVX to speed up the process and does a great job. It also has multiple generators and multiple parameters which make later terrain varieties easier to implement. You could also use libnoise, ...


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With Simplex noise, lower frequencies are smoother and higher frequencies are bumpier. The first thing to try is to use a lower frequency, and take out the smoothing step. I have a rough demo here — use a lower freq start and freq range to see smoother noise, or use a higher freq start or range or see bumpier noise.


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Always hard to answer a "best way" question, it really depends on what you want to generate. But anyway, you say you are smoothing out the vertices in relation to it's neighbor. But the smoothing should already be done by the noise itself with the correct parameters. You can generate all kinds of noise patterns with multiple iterations of different ...


1

Originally, GPUs were only used for multimedia applications which show little data reuse. As GPUs become increasingly used for general-purpose applications (hence, the term GPGPU), they are now featuring large size hardware-managed caches, for example, Fermi GPU has 768 KB of last-level cache, the Kepler GPU has 1536 KB of last-level cache, and the Maxwell ...


0

A nice but lesser well known algorithm for this situation is called dimensional reduction. If you keep your list of rectangles sorted on one axis (say, x axis by sorting on the minimum x value of the rectangles), then collision detection just becomes a 1 dimensional overlap test on the y axis, for whatever overlaps there were on the x axis. Works better ...


0

In the worst case (for 40 AABBs) you'll need to do 780 tests. There's not going to be any problems with a simple 4 comparison test: a_min.x <= b_max.x b_min.x <= a_max.x a_min.y <= b_max.y b_min.y <= a_max.y If all of these are true, you have an intersection. At this point partition structures (like AABB trees) are not necessary at all. You ...


3

You may want to consider looking to spacial partitioning, such as a Quadtree. In a nutshell, you would be dividing your world into sub-sections, and only check collisions between objects that are inside of the same sub-sections, greatly improving the complexity.


0

I read your question as can you use C++ to make 2D games in Unreal, to which the short answer is yes. Some key points to bear in mind: Everything you can do in blueprint, you can do in C++. So if you feel more comfortable in making your game in C++, it is fairly straight forward to follow blueprint tutorials and implement them in C++. A few bits and pieces ...


0

Blueprints are designer-friendly, so that you can introduce code-like behaviour from a friendly interface without actually writing code. Mind you, you can use C++ to achieve the same goal. When you write your C++ code, you can add some macros (UE tutorials show how) in your code to make it "visible" as blueprints. It's not an advertisement; it's a really ...



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