New answers tagged

1

the reason those things happen is because Unity's is limiting your FPS and that process tells you by how much its limiting it, since regular machines can reach as high as 60 FPS anyway theres no need to use 600 FPS CPU and waste all that power for nothing. the best you can do to solve that annoyance on the profiler is to just deselect Vsync from the ...


0

In the profiler capture it looks like SetPass and Triangles increase rapidly. Multiple cameras and render textures indeed can cause that because the scene has to be rendered multiple times.


0

well I can tell you from my experience that for me the SpeedTree's caused that. what the profiler is saying to you is "I have to wait for rendering to end before i call for the next frame update" therefor you get this bottle neck that chokes your application and that's why it uses 0 ms. there is a tutorial made by Unity regarding the Profiler and at the ...


1

While I don't know for sure what these two games do, this is how I would do it: Have a Canvas set up with a child GameObject (which can be a prefab) holding all Game Over UI elements. This starts as disabled In the UI GameObject have a script which listens to OnEnable and fills out the relevant info (stats etc) Have a Game Controller that controls the ...


1

If I would implement it in Unity I'd do a dedicated scene with a GUI to show whatever is needed. So in the main scene I would have some script not destroyed on load of a new scene (with DontDestryOnLoad(GameObject go) method) which have all the infos you want to display at the Game Over stage. You could also handle it in a whole scene with variables to ...


1

I can't give you exact implementation details for XNA, but the general idea is to completely forget the "fullscreen mode" - it is old and outdated, and at least Windows will not perform any faster with it, as Winodws changed to a DirectX desktop with Vista (or was it Win7?). Instead, you create an "extended desktop", ie. right-click at desktop / select ...


2

Go to Lighting tab beside Inspector tab. Under Precomputed GI make the value of Realtime resolution to 0.02 (lower than default). It will reduce bake time. It won't look good but will work fine. You can keep auto bake off after that baking done. Better CPU will help reducing time. Dedicated graphics card helps working Unity 5 better.


0

I found the answer: My game is actually very small but I resize it by a scale factor of 4. So I also have to divide the width and height of my bufferedimage by 4 inside the light render method public void render(Graphics2D g) { BufferedImage image = new BufferedImage(GamePanel.width / SCALE, GamePanel.height / SCALE, BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB);


0

There are several performance issues with the code sample you supplied. Consider using pop to increase performance for (; i < n; i++) { data = result[i]; vs while((data = result.pop()) != null) {... If it can't be destructive which I think looking at your code it can be then you can clone using var clone = myArray.slice(0); Performance is ...



Top 50 recent answers are included