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7

Unfortunately these kinds of unexplained stalls can be common, and very hard to answer perfectly. To answer the question precisely, we would have to know what is happening inside the driver during that short stall. NVidia and AMD only provide us with so much information about their driver's behaviour. Sometimes we have to make guesses. And sometimes the ...


3

which means I can only see half the model You can never see the "back" half of the model :P The following is a high-level overview listing some of the LOD considerations for this type of game. 100% of it may not apply to your game and/or KSP. Also, I haven't specified any implementation details for Unity, since I don't know them yet; rather than define ...


2

This technique is called LOD (Level of Detail). Look it up and you will easily find several references on the internet. How many levels of detail you use is completely up to you. It depends heavily on the camera's point of view, how many objects are within your viewport at the same time, and how many are so far away they are just barely visible. Using ...


2

You seem to be mixing polygons and vertices in your question. Polygons generally refer to triangles. As for the load on the graphics, you should probably aim for a "minimum requirement" device and see how it handles your game, graphics wise. This is going to be your maximum number of polys.


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It's slow because you're sending a drawcall for every polygon. And each drawcall means communication with the drivers and the GPU, which is slow (I don't know exactly how it is the OpenGL ES. But on Desktops your target is to minimize the amount of drawcalls). And that is, where vbo's come in. A Vbo stores all the vertices of an object in a buffer. If you ...


1

The issue is that you need a LOD algorithm. LOD stands for level of detail and it means essentially your sphere is only as big as it needs to be in each situation. When you are far away it uses fewer polygons. When you are zoomed in close, maybe only part of the sphere is in memory, and that visible section has a lot more detail than usual. There's lots ...


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Because you don't need more frames per second. Most computer monitors I know have their refresh rate around 60 Hz. Going beyond that, you would not notice the difference. More FPS for physics means a smoother simulation, but there is a point beyond which you don't gain much. Also, having more frames to pack in each second means you have less time for ...


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Research the new-ish tessellation stages. LOD and complex curved surfaces are both easy to implement with a hull shader. LOD example: A terrain, composed of 2 triangles, can be subdivided and the tessellation factor simultaneously used to select the appropriate mip for the displacement map. In this way, peaks of mountains would retain their height, but ...



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