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Typically most of the more feature complete game engines actually have 2 game loops. The first is a fixed step loop aimed at iteration around every 16ms for that ideal 60fps zone. The second is the "as fast as possible" loop. The idea is that some actions like physics processing need to have some idea of process in order to be calculated correctly and ...


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In theory, loading many textures will be slower. In practice, the actual amount by which it is "slower" is probably negligible. There are two main bottlenecks: Reading the texture file off the disk. Sending the texture to the GPU. Files on disk have some small-but-non-zero overhead in terms of book-keeping information for the filesystem. Thus, 16 files ...


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I made a test about integer operation witch looped a million times on x64_64 , reach brief conclusion like below, add ---116 microseconds sub----116 microseconds mul----1036 microseconds div----13037 microseconds the data above have already reduced the overhead induced by loop,


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I have an old phone, maybe 5-6 years old. It's not quite as powerful as it needs to be to run the OS I have running on it so everything just lags... it's pretty bad. I honestly don't think my phone could run a game with a fixed time-step particularly well. But I'm on an old android so you might be completely fine if you're targeting newer iPhones (much more ...


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The game loop is normally called update() that would update everything that happens since the last frame, then draw() that draws the changes, your game loop will work to ensure both update and draw run frequently so that if a large calculation is being run, the game screen doesn't freeze. So your update method will be given a max time if competition, if it ...



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