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One approach they have in Star Trek Online for herds of animals is to just pick an open direction and head in that, fast, de-spawning the animals after a certain distance. But that is mostly a glorified de-spawn animation for herds you are supposed to scare away from attacking you, and not suitable for actual combat mobs.


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Update solution: Even though I was inspired by Andrew Russell's solution. For anyone interested. I've solved it in the end as such. 1) I first detect intersection (point I) with graph (or multiple graphs afterwards). 2) Then I find point in angle higher than angle from an incoming point (Intersection -> Start). Such point is marked yellow. I'm only ...


14

The problem is with how you are formulating your navigation graph. If you'll allow me to butcher your diagram: Here is what the navigation graph should look like. For each node in the original graph with n edges, where n > 1, it should be replaced with n nodes. (Notice that each node in the graph is connected by two edges.) Inserting start and end nodes ...


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You're misrepresenting your graph. What you really have is something more like this: Where the red dots are your nodes, and the blue lines are your edges. This can be produced by creating four nodes for every node in your current graph. (There are actually even more edges that would be valid here as you could move diagonally between a number of these ...


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There is! You need to path find in a 3 dimensional space if the car is steering in a 2d space and use the third dimension as the cars angle. Then you could use A* or any other graph path finding algorithm and you"re good to go. The algos I go with are usually probabilistic roadmap or rapidly exploring random trees to generate the graph and A* to find a fast ...


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I would consider generating waypoint graphs instead. They're easy to work with, they give optimal paths, and are generally fast enough for reasonably small environments. The optimal path will be a series of line segments, and each vertex in the path will either be the origin, the destination, or a vertex of one of your obstacles. So although your ...


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new answer: In the real world, since this field is not densely populated, simply tell the characters to move in the desired direction and once they approach an obstacle, to go clockwise or counter-clockwise around it (depending on which way is shorter). To improve on this, you can walk the characters towards corners instead: In the general case, you ...



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