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How about combining techniques. Start with an image (painting, reference, etc.), and modify it to give you initial conditions for a 2D fluid simulation. Run the fluid simulation from these initial conditions for a while and then use the resulting velocity field to advect the source image.


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I guess it's a little late to post this answer, but, I was struggeling for a few days with the problem as well. I started from the gpu particle sample from Microsoft and wanted to make it rain. This was one difficult task, But in the end I was surprised that just a few things need to be changed after all. All I did was changing the ...


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I think Polyboards would be the thing for you. If you can get yourself a copy of Mathematics for 3D Game Programming and Computer Graphics, there is a section dedicated to this technique in the book.


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A small hack would be to set enemy to not visible on collision, and when the explosion finishes then remove it. But then you need to have a callback that is triggered when explosion finishes.


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The particles themselves associated with a particular effect shouldn't be tied directly to the object. While there is never a 100% use-case scenario, this still applies to most situations. Your object itself shouldn't be managing the life-cycle of a particle effect, though it may be the instigator for spawning particular effects in the world. So, in your ...


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Generally, quads can be replaced by triangles to save computational power. Since a quad is made of two triangles, you can simply make a bigger triangle that will encompass the whole particle texture (if any) and add it a transparency shader. You'll get an instant decrease of geometry computation by 50% compared to an all-quad system, for exactly the same ...



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