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32

No, it is not. You may obtain a source license from Valve, but Source itself is not open-source. Further, it is generally a very dangerous approach to use entire existing engines as learning material without guidance from somebody who was heavily involved in the development of that engine. Source code alone only tells you the how of particular design ...


20

There is no way to guarantee that the client in use is the client you want them to be using, there are always ways around every technique, even with a closed source application. When it comes down to it, with a closed-source application, any good reverse engineer with some free time can spoof packets to/from your server. In an open-source application, it ...


17

If you're looking for a rendering engine that does all of that first list right out of the box, I don't think you'll find a whole lot. Stuff like fancy lighting shaders and day/night stuff are very game/simulation specific, and most rendering engines either won't have that sort of thing built in, or the built in implementation won't meet your specific needs. ...


17

I would suggest that you sell: Distributions of the source: Build versions of the source code, tools, etc that people can work with. If they are modifying the source themselves then this won't help them, but if they just want to include a dll for example, this can simply things especially if your build process is complex. Another options is to sell ...


15

We can stop reinventing the wheel by... ceasing to reinvent the wheel. Use external libraries, game engines, etc. I get the sense that people do reinvent the wheel to: Avoid copyrights, royalties, etc on libraries or borrowed code Avoid paying for a game engine (for a full on AAA game, this can be enormously expensive) Maintain intimate familiarity with ...


13

Don't worry about your concept getting copied wholesale. It's much more work implementing a concept than coming up with one, and anyone who can put together a finished product will either have ideas of their own, or will change the game enough that it becomes different. If your game is awesome, then it'll be really hard to copy it and make a version that's ...


11

This will depend entirely on the license applied to the art assets. The number of open source licenses is always growing, so attempting to provide a list here would be pointless. You will need to research the specific license that's applied to the art. Some of these licenses will allow you to reuse the art. For example, in the link you provide, a majority ...


10

Most likely not - I doubt Torque would want their engine to be open-sourced. For a real answer, read the license you signed when you bought the engine. For an even better answer, read the license, then hire a lawyer to read the license. What you may be able to do is distribute the Torque modifications as a patch. Anyone who has the engine source will be ...


9

Short Answer: Yes, as long as the codebase differs from the cloned project in its implementations. (i.e. You don't directly use code from the original game) Long(er) Answer: This entirely depends upon the legal copyrights set forth by the original creator. By default, U.S. copyright law automatically grants copyright ownership to the original creator of ...


8

In my experience the people who are capable of writing their own engine from scratch are likely more technical than the people who can't. That being said, you may be hard pressed to find features that you can add to their code on your own and be of any use. I would take one of two approaches to this: Join their open source project. This seems obvious, ...


7

"Should I even bother?" + "Where do I begin without XP in game development" Sorry, but the simple answer is No The long answer is that MMO's are the hardest possible type of game to develop, with open-world titles being the only other thing close to as difficult. They often take teams of several hundred people with a wide range of skills, massive costs ...


7

I-am-not-a-lawyer but, my two-cents. Atleast in the United States, without a formal transfer of copyright each developer would own the work that they do. This is usually accomplished in the Employment Contract when you are hired by a company: See Works made for hire


7

No, but there is little difference between a PS3 game and a game for any other platform. The only thing that defines it as a PS3 game is the use of the PS3 APIs for graphics, IO, etc, all of which would have to be removed since they are under heavy NDA. If you want to look at game code, maybe check out Doom or Quake (both are GPL now).


7

First off, this is a question and answer site, rather than a project finding site. Secondly, you can only get an SDK for the Xbox if you are a licensed developer and pay a lot. So I doubt you'll find an open source one. However, you can create Xbox Live Community Arcade (?) games with XNA and C#, for $99 a year for a license. They won't be open source, but ...


7

My gf is a professional illustrator so I asked her to help me out on my latest game as I wanted more commercial level graphics. I now know why the credits at the end of the game go on for so long. In a 2d game each character sprite is drawn 30 to 40 times depending on the depth and that takes a lot of time. 3D textures take even more time when you think ...


6

The venerable Quake (ID tech) engine design has withstood the test of time and is probably the most successful game engine design of all time. Everything besides the renderer has been largely unchanged since the late mid 90s and is still used in modern games like ETQW. Full source code for four iterations of this engine (Quake 1 through 3, plus Wolf ET) is ...


6

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer. Game play can't be copyrighted so you're definitely safe on that aspect. Is it ok to distribute the source of my clone? You certainly are. You are the owner of the code. However, you cannot distribute the game's graphics. Using them in the game is allowable because they are separate works, so long as the user provides ...


6

I'd recommend running Doxygen: http://www.doxygen.org/ Here is a list of the features: http://www.stack.nl/~dimitri/doxygen/features.html Doxygen's uses the Graphviz tool kit to generate include dependency graphs, collaboration diagrams, call graphs, directory structure graphs, and graphical class hierarchy graphs. I find these types of diagrams helpful ...


6

I'm the Flare creator (main developer and main artist). Drop me a message if you have specific questions. All of Flare's art can be reused commercially. Some assets are CC0, some are CC-BY, some are CC-BY-SA. It's important to know the requirements of each asset you use and that you credit each artist. Share-Alike assets can only be remixed with other ...


6

I know there's an already accepted answer and it's not quite on the spot - but I also came here via Google and I was looking to learn and thought others might, too. There are other open-source Minecraft clones (and InfiniMiner which is what Minecraft is based off, too). I'd suggest anyone who is looking to study up on it looks at these: TechCraft ...


5

I think the best way to go about building a game engine is to start with what you already know pretty well and add those features that are tedious or repetitive. For example, I do a lot with Python / pygame (which is an SDL wrapper) I enjoy the system quite a bit, but there were three things that bothered me: Building the animation loop is tedious, and ...


5

In addition to Ben's answer, a bit of extra work is required to get it building in Visual Studio 2010. For the client project, you need to either change the name of the project from the default "Client (Swarm)" to just "client", or change the Target Name property to "client" from the default "$(ProjectName)". After this, it builds without a hitch.


5

The basic answer is that you first have to grab the Alien Swarm SDK. It should be a choice in the "tools" menu of your steam client. Download it, it's not very big. Then run it. One of the options is "Create a mod". This extracts the source code to a useful location for you and sets up some config options. The help guide from that menu has info on how to ...


5

According to the law you actually cannot do that. You want to protect the game rules, rules are inherently ideas, and ideas cannot be protected, only your text can be copyrighted (code and GDD), the name trademarked, and that is it. The patent law says it is illegal to patent ideas, including software and game rules (unfortunately patent offices ignore ...


5

You just don't. 1) try to be able to sell it, and if you really put a lot of effort on it, people will have a hard time re-implementing its "concept". 2) if you release with a license such as GPL, credits will not be usually a problem. Someone could still steal your code, and if they do you could sue if you knew (but you won't know). The EFF might help. ...


5

It appears SuperTuxKart is built using Irrlicht, so the question is in that context. This wiki page shows how to replace Irrlicht's internal input library with OIS which apparently supports force feedback. Hope this helps!


5

The only part of the FAQ I could see that came close to answering this is here. It states: Who owns the IP rights to the game I create? Can I distribute my game on non-Microsoft services? You own the complete IP rights to your game, and you're free to distribute through any service of your choosing. However, we may provide incentives for exclusive ...


5

You haven't told us your skill level. But, you can even try integrating Lua scripting functionality with any open source engine of your choice. There are libraries like Luabind & toLua++ for this. After quick google search there are some interesting results, IrrLua is a Lua binding for the Irrlicht 3D rendering engine. Last update : 08/23/06 ...


5

Doubtful. Almost certainly these games involved some code changes, whether minor or major. It would be very unusual if Quake 4 or Prey shipped with the exact Doom 3 code-base, replacing only the art assets and scripts. I'd be surprised if the Doom 3 code will run these games correctly. But since Quake 4 and Prey have not themselves been open-sourced (and ...



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