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9

Online multiplayer is becoming an increasingly important factor in my decision to purchase games. While that may just be me, it appears that people overall like to play games with other people. Social media games are a good indicator of this, though, I don't really consider those multiplayer for the most part. They do indicate that people like being able to ...


5

A combination of both strategies would likely yield the best results. Just keeping track of when user join/leave might not account for situations where the user is unexpectedly disconnected. A periodic poll would likely have to happen too often to get reasonably updated list of players joining and leaving. So, update the list when a player joins or leaves ...


5

Here's my two cents: P2P: Pros: No need for a central server: this makes it much cheaper, and more viable for low-budget indie games. Scales very well(up to a certain point when the average client just cant handle the bandwidth). Very good for data distribution: Suits games where user-created content is dynamically synced.(also just look at torrents) ...


4

It's simple arithmetic and requires no loops or periodic DB updates. The player has a rate of resource gain. This is fixed until some external stimulus happens like the player buying an item to change speed. You need only know the current speed and resource counts for this to work. Take the current time. Take the last time the resource counts were ...


4

The essence of the "host advantage" is having a low ping (round trip time to the server). If you are the server, you'd have no ping time, but even being really close to the server would result in a small ping and still have a large "host advantage", so I'm just going to call it a "low ping advantage" instead. It really depends on the game and how the ...


2

When you have a multiplayer game, you have to be aware that the players are able to cheat with everything that is computed locally. When you want the game to be fair, you have no other option than to move all game mechanics (movement, mob AI, collision detection, damage calculation, ..., ... ) to a central server. But let's assume that the community around ...


2

I've done things like this before using delta timing. Here is an example: int millisecondsThatPast = 0; int numberOfPowerUpsToGive = 0; int timeForEachPowerUp = 0; public void setTimeForEachPowerUp(int timeInMilliseconds) { timeforeachPowerUp = timeInMilliseconds; } public void onGameUpdate(int delta) { millisecondsThatPast += delta; int n = ...


2

The general gist is that you have two concepts of "state". Local state (your client) Ghost state (the server) You take input from your client, and update your local client state (and send this to the server). You then "predict" what happens to everyone else, assuming some amount of spatial consistency to last frame. When you get information from the ...


2

The best you can do is to make sure that you send as little data as possible while making sure that it's worth sending. As for the coordinates - I'd say that you can give it a try as I don't really understand why you haven't done that by now. So try sending both the direction and coordinates to the server which in return sends it to the other players. I ...


2

A big risk of peer-to-peer games is that without a central authority in form of a neutral server, there is no way to prevent cheating. Each client can interprete the outcome of the game however it wants. Some games declare one of the clients the host and let him be the judge, but when that client is a cheater, they decide the outcome of the whole game. With ...


1

Implementing peer to peer multiplayer games is not easy and not applicable at the moment. The problem you have is, that none of the peers knows all other peers so that you have multiple hops for each message which results in a higher latency compared to a client server model. See this paper for additional details. Round-based games could easily use such a ...


1

Cloud Gaming / Gaming on Demand / Game Streaming / Gaming as a Service (GaaS) is an up-and-coming set of technologies that, due primarily to advances in signal compression, do not require the sort of bandwidth one might expect in order to stream a framebuffer, every frame, to a remote client. NVIDIA Grid is such a technology. Here is a service provider for ...


1

It's always a question of which niche you want to target. Every niche has different needs. Since your game is multiplayer already it would make sense to add a online option. There are a lot of people who want to play games together but don't have the time or money to meet regularly in real life. By having a multiplayer only game you have to be local for you ...



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