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33

You don't want to send player input to the server. What you probably want to do is send an abstracted representation of what the player wants to do to the server, and then run the logic on there. Likewise you don't necessarily want to send back everything the client needs to do. For example, you can send some kind of message saying "NPC X died", and the ...


30

The way one would deal with this would depend on the game and what would make sense for that world. For example a sci-fi game, they could "beam up" to some space storage facility for cryo-sleep. A fantasy game could have them cast a spell on them self to fade away. Or they could be sucked into a portal. Make them turn really small and a bird or robot comes ...


25

Get user authorization and tell them exactly why you want that data. You'll get judged harshly in the court of public opinion for sneaking around in a player's machine and uploading information to your private servers. I am not a lawyer, you may want to ask a real lawyer whether clandestine information gathering is illegal in your jurisdiction. Whether ...


15

You can't stop memory editing cheats, so design your game so that such cheats won't matter. For an online game, sensitive data like money on your own server, and don't rely on the client to have the correct amount. That way it won't matter if players change the amount of money displayed on the client, because when the player purchases stuff the game checks ...


14

Simple ways to protect your game: Duplicate your data: store some information twice and compare the copies. If they are different, something is going wrong. You don't have to do it per variable, you can also make CRC's on some big areas of memory (ex: on a struct that contains all player information). Encrypt your data before its written to memory (and ...


13

You wouldn't bother. Immersion (wiki) : The state of consciousness where an immersant's awareness of physical self is diminished or lost by being surrounded in an engrossing total environment. This term is often used in the wrong way ; people think that good graphics makes a game more immersive, or that a real physics simulation will do the ...


13

I once found a very neat quote on the net that's very, very true for any online game: The client is in the hands of the enemy. As such, you can't really avoid people doing nasty things to your game client. Due to this, don't trust the client at all, i.e. everything important should at least be verified server side (better: calculated there). If this is ...


10

Kind of a crazy second answer here ... you can always convert it into a full-fledged strategy game. Just turn tic-tac-toe pieces into, say, Orcs or something exotic, and start building it up from there ... I know, it's weird, but you already have an established board with game mechanics. Start by adding pieces that modify the existing behavior (eg. enemy ...


10

Being able to decompile/reverse engineer the client code easily is really only a slight hindrance. Enterprising hackers have been bending executables to their will (maliciously and non-) for years before high-level, trivial-to-decompile languages like C# came on to the scene. Security through obscurity alone is no security at all. Any data on the user's ...


10

The coolest solution for this that I have heard about is how Neal Stephenson envisages how it could work in his book Reamde. Every character has a fairly intelligent auto-pilot. If your character is a fighter and you log off/loose connection, your character will spend its time training martial skills, eating, sleeping and so on. If your character is a ...


9

Online multiplayer is becoming an increasingly important factor in my decision to purchase games. While that may just be me, it appears that people overall like to play games with other people. Social media games are a good indicator of this, though, I don't really consider those multiplayer for the most part. They do indicate that people like being able to ...


8

Graphic adventure games of the type you describe were never made multiplayer for one main reason: By the time computer networking was ubiquitous, the graphic adventure game genre was already dead. The few graphic adventures still being made were being made as niche games for a niche audience, they intentionally weren't breaking new design ground. Yes, ...


8

Well, you got answers but your real answer is at "try yourself". The things differ from game to game. I did couple of multiplayer games for some distributed network game design course. The most challenging was doing a realtime action game where many players involved and sending inputs like hell. When it comes to that point, everything becomes problem. As ...


7

There are tons of books that you can find on Amazon to get you started. Just search 'XNA' on Amazon, and grab the first book that interests you. One title I highly recommend is XNA 4.0 Game Development by Example: Beginner's Guide by Kurt Jaegers. He'll walk you through several games step by step, the best way to learn, and most fun, in my opinion. You'll ...


7

Some of the old DIKU muds had a system called 'rent'. Your character only saved if you went to an Inn to log out, and payed enough rent to cover the cost of keeping your gear. It might seem a bit punitive to modern players but it had the effect of making characters appear to go to inns and sleep when they were out of the game, which keeps with the fiction.


6

Plimus, at least, gives you lots of different options; Fixed price in one currency, or set values of each currency Various rounding options on currency conversions As an example, 12.34 turns into.. 12.30 12.35 12.50 12.95 and so on, depending on the options you choose As to what price point to choose for your game, and whether you want to ...


6

I know this is disheartening, but I'd recommend getting a bit of single-player development experience before coding a multiplayer game. Multiplayer development has all of the issues of single-player, plus a hundred more. Doing a single-player game will let you learn some of the programming problems that can appear. When you no longer consider yourself a ...


6

The only examples I can think of stretch your definition a bit. Uru Live (Myst Online) is an undead MMO adventure game in the Myst series. It gives players their own instances of puzzle worlds, but some worlds require or benefit from players working together. Zork: Grand Inquisitor has a co-op mode where one player controls the player character and the ...


5

There's two important considerations for the game economy. 1) When items are not able to be traded between players. If the pack items aren't able to be traded/gifted/etc between players then don't worry about supply and demand. Just let people spend what they would like and be clear about what you can get from the pack. Mafia wars sets a great precedent ...


5

First question, how much do you care about cheating? Making a simple webapp for leaderboards is probably pretty easy, but it will instantly be spammed out of existence. I would look at curl as a decent async HTTP library that you should be able to integrate into just about any client code. For the server side, I assume you have no budget for dedicated ...


5

I first thought I would simply put it in the (MySQL) database Sounds good! but I think it will be too much. Then you don't know the limits yet. Seriously, just throw everything in a database. Don't care about performance too much at this stage, if it becomes an issue you can fix it later. Here's an abstract view of what your database could look ...


5

You could use any existing in-game mechanic that allows for fast travel to avoid breaking immersion. What exactly this would be depends of course heavily on the specific game and genre. As an example, in EVE Online if you disconnect while in space, your ship automatically warps to a random spot in the solar system and dissappears after a while. Warping is ...


5

I though about server asking client about its md5 however it's so easy to cheat. MMOs include a version checking system to help make sure that legitimate (non-cheating) users are using a compatible version, and to help them upgrade to a compatible version if they are not, in short its to make updating easier for the player rather than for any form of ...


5

Here's my two cents: P2P: Pros: No need for a central server: this makes it much cheaper, and more viable for low-budget indie games. Scales very well(up to a certain point when the average client just cant handle the bandwidth). Very good for data distribution: Suits games where user-created content is dynamically synced.(also just look at torrents) ...


5

A combination of both strategies would likely yield the best results. Just keeping track of when user join/leave might not account for situations where the user is unexpectedly disconnected. A periodic poll would likely have to happen too often to get reasonably updated list of players joining and leaving. So, update the list when a player joins or leaves ...


4

Make it 3d. 3d Tic-Tac-Toe is played on three 3x3 grids. You can win on any single board, or across boards (eg. top-left square in every board; or top-left, center-middle, and bottom-right across the three boards. Some win conditions: x.. ... ... .x. ... ... ..x ... ... (Winning on a single board) x.. x.. x.. ... ... ... ... ... ... (Same location ...


4

I would suggest just finding a round figure in your own currency and let the customers deal with the fluctuation. It looks smoother and most people have a rough estimate of how much their own currency is worth in comparison to the big world currencies. (Euro,USD,GBP) Because a customer usually just does a fast conversion in their heads they will still buy ...


4

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4

from my understanding, you send their servers your input, which is then processed by their machines. The whole action is processed, then the output is pushed to your screen, reducing the processing power by your computer a ton. i cant really get more technical than that, but from my understanding its pretty simple. Please correct me if i am wrong, i would ...


4

It's simple arithmetic and requires no loops or periodic DB updates. The player has a rate of resource gain. This is fixed until some external stimulus happens like the player buying an item to change speed. You need only know the current speed and resource counts for this to work. Take the current time. Take the last time the resource counts were ...



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