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Just in addition to @Loblums answer: AFAIK socket.io uses WebSocket as its default transport. With WebSocket being relatively new, not all intermediaries on the internet may be aware of it and handle it correctly. With an encrypted connection, chances of a WebSocket connection succeeding increase a lot, since then from the outside it's indistinguishable ...


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Yes. You definitely should. Use Lets Encrypt to get a free SSL certificate (or as many as you want/need). SSL is always good to have - without it, man-in-the-middle attacks will be launched and by the NSA if not anyone else. Most multiplayer games (e.g. Minecraft) just use raw packets. There's little reason to encrypt packets after one is authenticated as ...


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Unity uses Box2D Box2D JS is availible


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When you use two different physics engines, it will be almost impossible that they will always come to the exact same results. Large physics systems can behave quite chaotically (small changes in variables create drastically different outcomes). So considerable desynchronization will become inevitable. The most obvious solution would be to keep the physics ...


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Interesting Question! Let me try to answer some of your points: 1 - How do I simulate physics on the server, do I need to rewrite parts of client side on the server side using a JavaScript physics engine? Yes, essentially, thats what you would do, if you want physics on the server. You have to ask you the question: Do I need the server to validate ...


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In desktop games this is usually resolved by having the client assume it's allowed to do something (and running it's own physics engine etc). You could do the same thing here. The client uses the server to sync for online save or multiplayer and the server can reject events sent from the client; if this is the case the clients environment is set to what the ...



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