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60

Given the memory limitations of the SNES, the solution must be very simple. My guess is that they have another 16*16 grid that tells you how to handle collision in the tile. A tile can be: Empty Full (i.e. a square block collision) Half-full-1 (a diagonal top-left to bottom-right line collision) Half-full-2 (a diagonal top-right to bottom-left line ...


35

I actually know this. It's common in all SNES games. The hardware framebuffer redraws all of the sprites on every frame. If, while redrawing, a sprite draws over another sprite's pixel, if results in an event. The sprite quadtree is then scanned to figure out which one was actually impacted.


34

This is how it is actually done: [NOTE: I have reverse engineered this game] For collision detection, on a given screen in the Overworld, Link's hotspot offsets are used to calculate which 32x32 block(s) he occupies. Each block is defined by four 16x16 blocks. Likewise, each hotspot offset is further divided to determine which of these 16x16 blocks each ...


20

I found this article some time ago about the movement mechanics in Zelda. I think it answers your question: http://old.troygilbert.com/2006/10/the-movement-and-attack-mechanics-of-the-legend-of-zelda/


13

Costs I can't speak on personally, and I don't know if anyone who is a licensed developer can either. But there are some requirements that I do know of. I don't imagine it is that expensive because from what I saw around the internet the development kit for the Wii is under 5k. What will cost you however, is having a brick-and-motar location dedicated to ...


9

Nintendo supports developers with their DSiWare and WiiWare for people wanting to make a game downloadable through the console or handheld. The first step is to contact Nintendo to become a licensed developer (http://warioworld.com/). After you've made this important first step then Nintendo will be able to answer all of your questions. Be prepared that ...


8

Copyright expiry depends where you live. The simple answer is that they are copyright, and you can get sued. (More likely you'll get a cease-and-desist shutting down development of your game and threatening legal action.) If you really want a pokemon-style game, create your own unique game world and characters and use those.


6

It's not exactly Pokemon, but I think I've got just the thing for you. There are a couple of Final Fantasy VII FAQs down at GameFAQs that might be useful for understanding how this sort of behavior might work. In particular: THE FF7 ENEMY MECHANICS by Terence Fergusson THE FF7 BATTLE MECHANICS by Terence Fergusson The first one is probably the most ...


5

You can write your own games from scratch for many of the Nintendo platforms. devkitPro provides devkitARM, which can compile for the Gameboy Advance and the Nintendo DS, as well as devkitPPC, which can compile for the GameCube and the Wii. There are also utility libraries to help you access the hardware. Running your games is very simple on the GBA and ...


4

It comes with compilers (Metroworks Codewarrior, and GCC via cygwin), lots of documentation, lots of sample code for different techniques, a Nintendo designed emulator, and optionally development hardware. From a code perspective, it's all really low level, basically directly talking to hardware registers with macros. Lower level than even something like ...


4

The details of the content of the SDK are probably covered by NDA. That said, since SDKs generally contain compilers and other related tools and libraries. Access to the development hardware is often a separate issue, although to most developers they will appear to be part of the same package. You can use any text editor to write code, and just about any ...


4

Possible, yes, but at what cost? You'll require special hardware. There's a fairly comprehensive list found here. And there are compilers that will work for "popular languages" (most likely C++) (source). There's also a How To guide that can be found here. The most interesting steps being: 4) Find a GameCube software development kit. This kit will ...


4

Basically, if something has been created and was commonly used, it doesn't fade into oblivion. So searching google wont hurt. You code using C++, C, GCC objective C with no Java. For the SDK you could go with the DevkitPPC. http://wiibrew.org/wiki/DevkitPPC


3

Let's take a look at the signatures of the functions: PrintConsole* consoleInit ( PrintConsole * console, int layer, BgType type, BgSize size, int mapBase, int tileBase, bool mainDisplay, bool loadGraphics ) bgInit ( int layer, BgType type, BgSize size, int mapBase, int tileBase ) In both ...


3

Don't let the lack of memory management scare you off. A rudimentary smart pointer class is surprisingly easy to create on your own, and there are lots of other easy ways to simplify managing your memory: Use static objects for things that you need one or a fixed number of. Use object pools for objects you need to create and destroy dynamically and whose ...


3

GBA and DS dev is not open to individuals, neither the software or the hardware used in development can be acquired unless you are an employee of an established game development company. That being said, there was a fairly good homebrew GBA dev community back in the day, and I think it has carried on into the DS somewhat. Check out http://gbadev.org, they ...


2

$2,000 to $10,000 is the range given by Nintendo. From Nintendo of America: Development Kits: Approximate development costs range from $2,000 to $10,000, depending on the size of your team. Financial stability is expected by Authorized Developers in order to purchase the necessary development equipment for your project.


2

Yes you could but you would need to actively sniff the data and address bus on the cartridge with some dedicated hardware and have it spit it somewhere.. I know the arduino mega has a fair amount of digital I/O but i don't think the software serial would be fast enough especially if you wanted it to chuck data both ways. Another way would be to piggyback ...


1

To do something basic like a Hello World program on a console like the Nintendo 64 you wouldn't need to use the GPU to do the rendering, you can just write your message directly to the framebuffer. The framebuffer is were the rendered image is stored before it's scanned out to the TV. The RCP Documentation linked to at the bottom of this page does a very ...


1

Things like this aren't just about providing a checksum or serial number as part of the program or image. That would be too easy to trick. In such situations one basic paradigm would always be true and important: "don't trust the image" (at all). It's more likely the checksum is created on startup (doesn't have to include the whole image data to speed up ...


1

Copyright protecion lasts for the life of author and 70 years based on the the longest living author if jointly created or if work of corporate authorship, works for hire, or anonymous and pseudonymous works, the shorter of 95 years from publication, or 120 years from creation.


1

I'd say in most cases it's handled by the publisher. Don't have a publisher/want to self publish? Nintendo probably doesn't want to talk to you, then. If you had some industry connections it might be a different story, of course. It's a case of "if you have to ask, you'll never know".


1

Your legal options? None short of getting a Nintendo dev license. And I doubt that's going to happen. Unit testing, managed code? I seriously doubt that. AFAICS, you need to code it in assembly, or native C/C++. I feel some C++ unit testing framework will probably work though..maybe not for the DS specific bits. For actual development, the one that came up ...


1

There is also Wiiware & You -could- run a homebrew game, but I really don't know much about it. To develop for Wiiware you have to be approved as a licensed developer for Nintendo. Information on the process can be found here: http://www.warioworld.com/


1

Just because your question doesn't really belong here, doesn't mean I won't try to give you an answer! :) If you are set on hacking this thing and adding a battery, that's fine. But might I suggest obtaining an alternative instead? The everything2 post on SNES Backup Units lists several others, some of which do retain their memory through a poweroff: ...


1

Unity provides Wii and Wiiware licenses but, I'd imagine they come at a hefty price. Still if you have the cash, it is a great environment to work in.



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