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That's not how your online game will work. When playing on separate computers, you'll still only have one camera active at a time. There will be two instances of the game being run, clients A and B. A will have camera 1 active, B will have camera 2 active. The rest of the game world is synced between the clients. It will be a lot of work to retrofit your ...


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I solved the problem on my own. My previous implementation of the networking engine made reconciliation impossible. The code I am using is private, though I plan on open sourcing the Box2D server/client-side prediction eventually. My solution is as follows: My game code is put into a separate custom Entity-Component-System, called NetEngine. The NetEngine ...


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No. It makes it so difficult to alter the relevant data for malicious (cheating/hacking) purposes that it is effectively impossible for most casual players who would want to cheat to do so or to obtain cheat software to help them do so. However, it's not technically impossible. Just like hackers can breach the security of social networking websites, bank ...


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If you're careful enough, your typical users will not be able to change this data on your own servers (see Josh's answer). However. It does not mean that they won't be able to cheat related to that data. If your game transfers this data to your users every time they need it, they still could discard it, replace it by their own, perform game simulation ...


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A UDP datagram sent to the broadcast address is delivered to all nodes on the LAN. I don't normally do networking in C# but it should go something like this: First, listen for packets with any destination address. new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, ...) Now, send packets to the broadcast address: new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Broadcast, ...) These packets will ...


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Here's a quote by Sam Jansen from a comment on gafferongames.com: Speaking as a network researcher and not a game developer, the conclusion to never use TCP and UDP together seems a bit strong. TCP will only have packet loss if it is sending too much data; in some ways just like the UDP data you are sending. The difference is you have no direct control ...


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I'm not sure how your code is failing (you only say it doesn't do the right behavior, not what the actual observed behavior is), but I can see what looks like two issues. A better explanation of what is actually happening would help a lot. One, you don't have any code to react to the collision. If the food is not being consumed when the player hovers over ...



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