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10

Without knowing more about the exact game you're writing, and how you're writing it, it is very difficult to say generic solutions to your problem. However, you may want to consider this decision you're taking of leaving the networking code to the end, depending on how crucial networking is for your game. What I mean is that, if you're writing a network ...


7

One of the most common misunderstandings of TCP vs UDP is that TCP's main feature is reliability. The main feature of TCP is that it abstracts a stream of data to send from one socket to another. Reliability, as provided by TCP is a requirement for the abstraction to work, but is not the central idea behind TCP. You might want to consider basing your ...


2

I'm in a similar situation, but I'm trying to do a networked simulation more than a game; but I think that my approach may help your design process. My approach is along the line of your comment on IPC (inter-process communication). First, as background I am studying the book "Networked Graphics" by Steed and Oliveira. This provides a good background on ...


1

Input prediction generally works as following: Client sends commands to Server AND runs the same code as the Server to predict its actions. Client stores a number of timestamped commands. Now in the same step: Client receives new state from server. Client (knows its latency) rolls back in time for [latency] seconds (undo commands relative to [latency] ...


1

It's hard to tell for sure from the information given but it sounds like what you are trying to do is make the client and server run deterministic code such that if they start with the same starting state and process things on the same loop numbers that they will result in the same values for the same calculations. Is that correct? One thing you are doing ...


1

If you're learning about all this stuff, why not write a simple single-player Version 1, and once that's working, with your deeper knowledge, rethink the whole thing in-depth for Version 2 that will be multi-player?


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Yes photon can handle it. Btw a master server(what you meant with running photon in a dedicaded server) is whole differen thing. Master Server is a dedicated server which you run on your own machine and you are all able to edit the photon way you want. From what i understand you are trying to make a server(actually a photon room) which stays 24/7 online, no ...


1

You should be able to use java without any performance problems, the technology went way past that. Although services that work with massive number of clients still use c++. As for your choice of sockets, it's not a matter of performance, as people usually think, it's about what are you going to use them for. On game servers you don't care if messages are ...


1

In client-server architecture, server is said to be always listening to its port(s) so that any client can connect to it at anytime. Also, clients usually have dynamic IP addresses and the port used for the connection may vary from machine to machine; on the other hand, servers should have static IPs (at least, DNS translation helps us) and the port(s) used ...


1

For 200+ moving objects, you're definitely going to want to make your game lockstep. With lockstep, comes the need for determinism but that shouldn't be too hard for bacteria (which can be simulated with circle-circle collisions). If you don't mind my shameless self-plug and want an example with the networking and simulation logic of a lockstep game, check ...


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Panda Pajamas excellent answer has covered a lot of the topic, but if you want more detailed information I suggest taking a look at Gaffer on Games series of blogs on 'UDP vs TCP'. There Glenn Fiedler goes into more detail about the problem with using TCP for games with real-time requirements, and suggests how you can build reliability into your own ...



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