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3

You can safely throw out Ping from the board. Lag compensating can work relying on just number of ticks for which commands were received (including NoCommand commands) and confirmed. Since the game is p2p (via server or not it does not matter), each client has number of packets from other clients queued for execution and confirmations of packets he sent. ...


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I'm not used to UDK, by the way I'll try to answer your question at just a theoretical level. I'm trying to implement network games in a project of mine, and found out how to let client ping check servers without actually joining games. Also, this is an intuition from Halo:CE network code. Let's suppose the central server browser has a list of servers, ...


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Their service would call your server executable (if it was called server.exe) like below server.exe -game_id= -game_build_version= -game_mode= -server_host_domain= -server_host_port= -server_host_region= -playfab_api_endpoint= -title_secret_key= -custom_data= -log_file_path= -output_files_directory_path= -batchmode When they say, In designing your ...


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After searching around, it seems that synchronizing the clocks of 2 or more computers is not a trivial task. A protocol like NTP does a good job but is supposedly slow and too complex to be practical in games. Also, it uses UDP which won't work for me because I'm working with web-sockets, which don't support UDP. I found a method here however, which seems ...


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Nat punch-through is not guaranteed to work in all circumstances. ISPs can filter out these types of requests, and phone networks are notorious for doing so. This is what unity says about networking on mobile devices, and This is where they talk about nat punchthrough (which you are right, they make it sound like 'maybe' it will work). I hate giving bad ...


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This is rather broad and vague question. Lockstep requires at least one command sent per tick to indicate there is no actions happened. Also you need to send a packet to verify to other clients that the client has received their packets. Each step every player needs to send his commands (wrapped into one packet for simplicity) and confirmations of ...


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Int32, Int16, Int16, Int32, Int32, Int32 If your app wrote these numbers in this order, then you just read them in the same order. It is your game and you just know the format you are sending and read it the same way you wrote it. If you want to be able to change the format (e.g. send Int8 for a small map and Int16 for a big one) you define a key that ...


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My solution has been to combine both 1 and 2 into a "watching me list" on each object. When adding a client to an object's list, it sends a full state packet. Then on each update, it can send a delta compressed packet. When the object is no longer relevant to a client, simply remove it from the list and possibly send a "forget me packet" so the client ...



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