Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

44

There's a great (long) list of music/sound sources at UnityAnswers: Where can I find music or sound effects for my game?. A sampler of some of the free ones: 8bit-collective ccmixter.org Flash Kit sound effects HartwigMedia Freesound.org Musopen classical music Open Music Archive Incompetech.com Nosoapradio Soundimage.org


32

You need an art lead and proper art style documentation. There are things like palettes to determine, plus various bits of example concepts, a lot of art terminology that clearly defines things to artists in ways that tech terminology clears things up for developers. A good art lead can define all these and make your consistent art style, and properly ...


26

No. In most cases... also, I am not a lawyer, find one they help. Arrangements of, and recordings of, specific performances of classical music are both copyrighted separately. This means that even if a piece in its original form is in the public domain, the piece itself is still someone's active intellectual property. So, when can you use classical music? ...


23

I am not a lawyer and this is not considered legal advice. Yes it would be illegal. You have to contact the owner of the song, and work out licensing details. It is likely to be very expensive.


18

arteriamusic.com audiojungle.net beatsuite.com firstcom.com ibaudio.com instantroyaltyfreemusic.com istockaudio.com revostock.com sounddogs.com soundeffects.com soundsnap.com stockmusic.net tallarico.com AmppiStore Magnatune (from below) Biglion (from below) gamedev.net contractors Christoph Klinger 8 bit peoples (Including minusbaby, who was recently ...


18

There are actually some fairly standard approaches for designing music playback in a game. When designing a music playback system, problems you face involve creating smooth transitions, ensuring there is enough variety, and creating a sense of interactivity with the music. Your question title, "changing background music smoothly" tells me your main concern ...


17

No. You can't distribute anything you don't have permission for. Crediting or not makes no difference. Unless the song was distributed under a license which explicitly permits redistributing it (such as CC-By) you'll need to get permission from the copyright holder, else it will be copyright infringement and the copyright holder can sue you for it.


12

Jonathan Blow licensed all of the music used on Braid from Magnatune.com (here's a post on his blog where he talks about it). So I was thinking that perhaps you could get an estimate of a reasonable price from their website. Here's their licensing information page and here's a sample page they provide that lets you estimate the price for licensing one song ...


11

You have two options: 1) The indirect route: Find sites that distribute music and put it there. See Where is quality paid game music? and Where can I find free music for my game? 2) The direct route: Find a project in development and talk to them directly. See "Finding a project" from here: Open Source game projects


11

This is a list of songs in the public domain: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Sound/list


10

You are using a derivative of the song, which falls under copyright. Also it doesn't matter whether you credit the original artist or not make a profit. It is still copyrighted.


10

I don't see how being an indie developer changes the problem set other than probably having a smaller budget. Your list of options probably fall something like this: Have a sound guy on staff to do all custom stuff Contract out a sound guy from one of the many sound studios Get lucky and "know a guy" (online or in meatspace) who does music who will do it ...


10

Insert I-am-not-a-lawyer disclaimer here The notes of a song are already eligible for copyright. Taking the notes of a song and interpreting them differently creates a derivate work. This work must not be published when the copyright holder of the original song didn't give their permission. When the composition of the song is not under a free license, the ...


9

I'll paraphrase my answer from Audio copyright questions (and I am Not a Lawyer :) Note that this assumes you're in the US (or other Berne signatory countries), and in particular, Canada may be different, as was discussed. It also assumes that when you say, "bought a song", you meant bought a copy from Amazon or somewhere - if you actually bought the ...


9

The question "How can I work with an arbitrary amount of artists, yet maintain artistic consistency across the entire game?" cannot be solved with a one-size-fits-all answer - it is dependant on your specific project. If you edit your question and provide more details on your specific problem, then perhaps we can help with your problem of scale and ...


8

Games need to provide feedback to the player to let them know what's happening. Chiefly feedback is provided in one of 3 ways: visual feedback (graphics, flashes) aural feedback (sounds) tactile feedback (vibration/rumble) (... maybe one day there'll be taste + smell feedback too) Feedback can be given for aesthetic reasons as well as for practical ...


8

http://www.jamendo.com/ is a decent place, no idea on prices though. EDIT: Looks like an online game is $36.


8

If you're interested in creating a large amount of music (for one game or many in the future), I'd recommend grabbing some easy to use music creation software (like GarageBand on OSX, or ACID on Windows). It's pretty easy to create some basic tracks with the included samples, and you can pretty affordably find more samples. Don't think you can write music? ...


8

http://www.footagefirm.com/stock-music/all-music.html I've bought music from this group before. They often have sales for large collections (~20 tracks, with 4 variants of each track including loopable 1 minute sections) going for $8.41, or short samples (~40seconds) going for ~$5. Their collections are generally grouped by theme/atmosphere, with Scifi ...


8

Neither being an indie developer, nor releasing game for free, doesn't grant you some additional rights implicitly. You can either need to have agreement with rights owner, or use music that is in public domain or other license (like CC license) that allows some sort of free usage. Also as Markus correctly mentioned in comment, Public Domain is a tricky ...


8

If the artist has entered into an agreement with a royalties collection agency - whether for the recording, or the songwriting - then you can't use their music without a licence from the relevant agency or agencies in order to use the music. This is because the artist has assigned their rights to the collection agency, and is no longer legally allowed to ...


8

Sure you can, it's just not trivial to get it sounding "nice". I don't know how to do it in Linux, but if you can play a PCM buffer, all you have to do is fill it with whatever you want. So supposing your buffer is set to play in monaural, signed 16-bit samples, at 44100 samples per second, creating a pure (sinusoidal) A4 sound (440 Hz) is as simple as ...


8

Let's rephrase this: would it be OK for the musician to take your game and sell it along with his song as long as he mentioned you somewhere in the "About" page? Without even asking you? I did not think so. Since you are creating copyrighted works yourself now, I suggest you spend an hour browsing wiki on the subject of Copyright and then Trademarks to ...


8

This should be legal, but be careful where your music is coming from. If you're using sound samples provided by software you need to ensure it's OK to use those sound samples. There's something in music composition called Sampling. This is taking small bits of other music and re-using it in your own. The legal issues surrounding sampling are a grey area, ...


7

Well, solitaire (that comes on Windows machines) doesn't have background music. Despite that, I think if you can find a decent background music loop that fits the feel of the game and is not obnoxious (i.e. can the user tell when the song is starting over again? and again? and again?), then you should add it. Just be sure to add an option to turn it off.


7

When it comes to music that is mostly original, I am very fond of the Newgrounds Audio Portal. Of course you have to ask for permission first, and abide by the Creative Commons restrictions that the creator has placed, but in general its very nice. There is alot of talent there though.


7

The MediaPlayer in XNA has always had a short delay when looping songs and I haven't seen any way to resolve the issue. What is your target platform? You could consider using XACT if you are targeting the Xbox or Windows as it doesn't have the same issues as the MediaPlayer API. I'd recommend against using SoundEffect (as recommended by Sprunth) to play ...


7

As far as I know: as long as you pay for the software (not pirate it by, for example, downloading it via bit torrents) you can use it. However, for example, if in GarageBand you use existing audio loops/samples, you may have to check for clearance with the creator or owner of the rights to the samples.


7

Distributing copyrighted music without a license from the copyright owner is a violation of copyright, and is illegal in most parts of the world. Yes, it's still a violation of copyright even if you distribute it for free. Yes, it's still a violation of copyright even if you credit the artist. Yes, it's still a violation of copyright even if you hold your ...


7

This is all going to depend on how capable you are as an audio machine and what your budget is. If you do it yourself, you can either find some tools that let you generate sound effects or you can record your own from coconuts or something. If you try recording your own I would highly recommend you try renting or borrowing some nice audio equipment, since ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible