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1

As others have pointed out, you can't be sure the player has a keyboard with anti-ghosting so this simply wont be possible on most non-gaming keyboards. Regardless, I think the best solution would be to let the players decide when the game starts. Everyone positions their hands where they're comfortable then each player is prompted, one by one, to press ...


2

Just as a heads up, most keyboards have a finite limit of keys that can be pressed. For example, I have an Asus Transformer Book and you can only press around ~5 keys at a time. Some keyboards also won't allow more than a few keys pressed if shift or control is being pressed. (Like my Transformer Book...) And yes, most of the time, this is hardware limited, ...


0

Depends on the player's keyboard hardware. You cannot make a set that will work for sure on everyone's computer. Make sure your game design does not encourage the players to hold more than one key, as you'll run into the limit on the number of keys that can be reported at a time.


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WASD and Arrow Keys are good options for two players. According to Wikipedia, IJKL is a common option, so that could be used for the third player. If the keyboard has a number pad, you can use that for the fourth player. Otherwise, GVBM is the most spaced set of letters in the WASD shape. For the fifth key for each player, you could potentially use a ...


2

I don't think the WebSockets protocol has the speed that you'd be looking for in a real-time game. "The technique is effective, but is not well suited for applications that have sub-500 millisecond latency or high throughput requirements." Websockets are built on top of TCP, which ensures that every packet of information is received by the client. Do you ...


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Your game seems to be too "real-time" to think in terms of time steps. I'd only think in terms of "turns" if the game can be considered "turn-based". Otherwise, just abandon the idea of turns or steps. Everything becomes easier then :) Note that you predict locally for your player, and interpolate only for other entities (as explained in the 3rd article in ...


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Of course you can but there are problems you wouldn't like to run through, different platforms has diferent architectures, different memory structure, different float point, different byte length, etc. So probably your code will not work as expected os simply, output different things in each platform. If you are working in a "high precision math" (anything ...


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Is it possible? Yes, but it will be very difficult, from a programming standpoint, as has already been addressed. From a design standpoint, I cannot imagine a game that would be enjoyed by people on such varying devices. Most console and PC gamers play more action-y games than mobile games, and if your game is a multiplayer action game console and PC gamers ...


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I'm having similar issues with UNET calls running in a different order in the Editor vs in a build. The reason your issue is happening is that networked scene objects are turned off when an online scene first loads, and Awake won't run until the object is enabled. For whatever reason these objects seem to get enabled slightly later in a build than they do ...


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Is it possible? Yes. Is it a good idea? No, for various reasons that involve trying to balance the game for the many different input devices. As for the difficulties in actual development, most modern game engines are purpose built to be able to port the same game to PC, xbox, playstation, mobile devices, and macs without too much trouble aside from ...


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WebGl does not support threading currently. As for your error, I can't say what it is exactly. It's still tough to debug WebGL builds.



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