Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Let the user configure the bindings from an options menu in the application. Players might be using QWERTZ (German) or AZERTY (French) layout keyboards, Dvorak layout keyboards, joysticks, etc., and they don't want to have to learn Yet Another Config File Language. But still, a lot of players will want to jump in and play without changing any settings. So ...


1

You could have the users configure their settings when they choose to start for the first time. Some games have you manually set your gamma and screen size, as I am sure you have experienced before. You could prompt each player to select what key they would want to use for the functions you have in your game. A Config file seems less intuitive. A options ...


5

The best way to solve your concerns for flexibility and comfort of the user is to certainly allow them to define their bindings as you have described. Whether you opt to do this through a configuration file they manually edit or an in-game screen that allows them to select the action and then press the key configurations for said binding is entirely up to ...


2

It depends on the keyboard in question. There are certain combinations of keys that don't result in all the keys registering as pressed. For example, pressing A and Q at the same time might only register Q. Since this depends on hardware details, there's no one solution for you. One good solution I saw was the KeyJam for Star Control 2's Super Melee mode. ...


0

When communicating between client and server you're using RPC calls. These RPCs are possible with the NetworkView script attached to an object. For simplicity, it's easiest to attach your communication scripts (the ones making invoking the RPCs) to the same object that the NetworkView script is attached to. This needs to be done on both Client and Server. ...


1

You're worried that if you optimize something now, it might turn out to be wasted effort in the future. But more importantly, if your system is working now, as-is, then it's wasted effort here in the present! That said, minimizing server-client traffic is generally a good idea, especially if the clients are out in the real world, on unknown networks, and ...


1

There are two possible approaches to what you are describing, one wrong and the other useful. The wrong approach is to simply delay the user input from activating the command. Assuming you know the other clients can be informed 99.9% of the time in half a second, delay the command for half a second and send it to the other clients as the pair <command, ...


2

Since Unity can publish games to iOS, this would be just like making any other client server application. The easiest would be to have the iPads all connected to the same network as the host PC, but you could easily utilize the Master Server tools provided with Unity to get everyone connected. You'd likely use RPCs for most of your communications. As long ...


0

The exact answer to this is going to be pretty specific to the way you've designed things. Essentially the strategy is to make the AI use the same methods that the player does. It shouldn't just run everything in a single tight loop. Break the AI's decisions and actions into discrete parts. Then, using something like a decision tree or behaviour tree ...


0

A thought. Have the player have their own world that's synched with the server world, then check for out of sync by using a special sync object with positional values (compare them every so often).



Top 50 recent answers are included