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High Level Languages Turn Into Assembly Languages I think you're overestimating the difficulty of building a high level language to provide to your players, you can quite easily build an interpreter to your simple bot scripting language that compiles down to a bytecode that runs on a virtual machine you can advance in fixed intervals in parallel with other ...


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What you are trying to do is far outside the usual use-case of off-the-shelf script engines. Scripting engines use lots of optimization tricks to run code as fast as they can. But that means the programmer can not know for sure how fast code will actually run. The runtime behavior could also change when you install some minor update to the scripting engine. ...


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Have you considered supporting gamepad controllers? For inspiration the game Duel (https://github.com/odanek/duel6r) supports 4 positions on keyboard + others on gamepads. And for completeness - numpad keys can be used too to give you more room around the keyboard.


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In the lobby manager, add a new panel (or change an existing panel, whichever is easier to you) which contains all the general game settings that you need. When a player hosts a new game, then display this new panel and get all the information, and then start a new game accordingly. Hope this helps


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You can try instantiating it on the network using: Network.Instantiate() Here is the documentation


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What you can do is not to send to the server the game statuses(like positions), just the clients inputs. So on client input (lets say that clientA press 'fire' button), you can send this event to the server ('fire from clientA'), then the server broadcasts the event to all clients and are the clients whom finally make the changes, with the Phaser engine (...


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Here's a quote by Sam Jansen from a comment on gafferongames.com: Speaking as a network researcher and not a game developer, the conclusion to never use TCP and UDP together seems a bit strong. TCP will only have packet loss if it is sending too much data; in some ways just like the UDP data you are sending. The difference is you have no direct control ...


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As others have pointed out, you can't be sure the player has a keyboard with anti-ghosting so this simply wont be possible on most non-gaming keyboards. Regardless, I think the best solution would be to let the players decide when the game starts. Everyone positions their hands where they're comfortable then each player is prompted, one by one, to press ...


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Just as a heads up, most keyboards have a finite limit of keys that can be pressed. For example, I have an Asus Transformer Book and you can only press around ~5 keys at a time. Some keyboards also won't allow more than a few keys pressed if shift or control is being pressed. (Like my Transformer Book...) And yes, most of the time, this is hardware limited, ...


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Depends on the player's keyboard hardware. You cannot make a set that will work for sure on everyone's computer. Make sure your game design does not encourage the players to hold more than one key, as you'll run into the limit on the number of keys that can be reported at a time.


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WASD and Arrow Keys are good options for two players. According to Wikipedia, IJKL is a common option, so that could be used for the third player. If the keyboard has a number pad, you can use that for the fourth player. Otherwise, GVBM is the most spaced set of letters in the WASD shape. For the fifth key for each player, you could potentially use a ...



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