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4

It results in packet loss for UDP due to contention between the two protocols - remember that UDP is not guaranteed delivery, while TCP is. More TCP packets will get through while UDP suffers - TCP induces UDP packet loss. There has also been the (historical) idea that router infrastructure favours TCP over UDP, though I doubt that is still true by this late ...


3

I wouldn't store them on clients, or even ship that information with game. If security is your main concern, fetch all informations required at the beginning of the game (from a database), store them temporarily, and delete them after the game session ends. You can also cross-check local data with database during gameplay if you want an extra layer of ...


2

You probably do want to communicate to this information to the client so that they are able to view it. You can treat the client as a dummy terminal though with sparkly representation and have a "neutral" server as the authority. Lets consider League of Legends in this context. At the beginning of the game, each client connects to Riots servers. Every ...


2

Is this a reasonable idea? Yes What are the possible drawbacks? Packet Loss, more code complexity, another connection to manage == more chance for disconnects, time outs, exceptions, whatever ... Are there better ways to handle this? Use an existing Reliable UDP Library. Two of the most popular are: Lidgren Network (C#), RakNet (C++). From ...


1

In a multiplayer racing game, the client should be communicating position updates to the server. The server will then sanity check the message and update all the other clients. Never, ever trust the client to do these kinds of calculations for you. If you have the server do all the calculations, then you don't need to worry about the client telling the ...


1

It depends on how your software architecture looks. When you have a clear separation between user input, ai input, game mechanics and graphic engine, then you should be able to simply switch out the ai input with a second user input. But when you have tight coupling between the AI code and the other components of your game, then it might be quite a lot of ...



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