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11

http://mudbytes.net/ was established for exactly the purpose you're looking for.


10

When you want perma-death to matter as much for the victim as it matters in real-life, you also need equivalent consequences for the killer. In just about any real-life society (present or historical), murder is the crime which receives the highest punishment that society is willing to administer. In any judical system of today, a murderer is either ...


8

The %attacker% approach can be extended to include some information other than just the names of the objects: The verb may be singular or plural. This depends on the subject. "You attack X" (singular 2nd person subject) vs. "Extrakun attacks X" (singular 3rd person subject) vs. "The goblins attack X" (plural 3rd person subject). Most verbs just need an -s ...


6

MUDs typically have a text interface accessible via a simple TCP stream. Developers who wish to write game logic in arbitrary languages could simply have their programs interface with the MUD back-end via that text interface. Let them log into pseudo-characters and send text commands to the back-end, and receive results across that existing interface. ...


5

I can't believe no one has mentioned successful MMOs centered around PVP permadeath: DayZ and Eve Online (or almost-permadeath in Eve's case). These are games that reward player killing, and have the entire gameplay experience built around that ability. If you are familiar with these games, you can stop reading and use them as case studies on how a ...


4

Please include a good crafting system! I find fighting to be boring and crafting to be somehow entertaining. I know many people feel the opposite, thus the popularity of MMOs like WoW and Guild Wars which focus almost entirely on combat. But please don't neglect to have a nice crafting system in your MUD for people like me. I know I'm not alone! It's just ...


4

Instead of having a single string, and trying to substitute into it properly, you could have a whole set of them. Start with the objects. You know, when creating the mob, what to refer to it as. You can give it a specific property, separate from it's name, for substituting into attack strings. Weapons can have multiple strings for variety, and can substitute ...


4

There is a set of modules for Perl starting with Lingua::EN::Inflect that deals with these issues. Even if you're using a different language, the API choices made might help you frame your own design.


3

If your room layout is consistent enough (all connections are the same length and can be traversed in both directions, and no rooms overlap), this is a simple exercise in recursion. Here's a quick piece of code that should do it: var offsets = { "N": [0, -1], "E": [+1, 0], "S": [0, +1], "W": [-1, 0] }; // recursively plot the locations of ...


3

http://www.andreasen.org/newmud/ Looks like a good resource, with a list of over 30 different open source MUDs. Just for reference I found this by searching Open Source MUD on google.


2

You could allow combat commands as they come in and then add a time delay after commands based on how long they would take to execute. Dragonrealms uses this method for combat as well as many other actions, it is called Roundtime there. Heavier weapons get a greater time and you can reduce it, but not eliminate it with strength and agility.


2

The way I handle this is through a large set of systemry that, among other things, involves modeling the message as a data structure rather than a string. The values for the attacker and the defender are their actual objects; the verb ("inflict" in your message) is marked as such, and knows the object for the person performing it, so that the message ...


2

You could provide players with some easy to obtain equipment to see in the dark (a torch, for example), but discourage its use for advanced players by making other equipment options available which result in superior character performance, but do not have the light perk. An easy to acquire torch, for example, could be useful as a weapon itself in the ...


2

You could have alternative, very short, vague descriptions of locations for use at night. Also available interactions with elements of the room could be different. This way the player could be able to for example notice that there is some road sign pointing to some important location (which might be the city) and during day the player could be able to read ...


2

There is - and can't be - a system which accepts any language. After all, to achieve that goal, somebody would have to add compilers or interpreters for languages like Piet or Befunge. While this is certainly possible for any given language, it's not possible for all of them - while you're implementing them, somebody will just invent a bunch of new ones. ...


1

Recovering a character's body from a state of death might leave permanent damage to its physiology / neurology: XP/memory Loss (Diablo) Loss of physical integrity (D&D; constitution loss on Raise Dead) Loss of skills, intellect etc. ...I find the increased chances of raising a drooling idiot from the dead to be quite attractive as a gameplay dynamic, if ...


1

The key to a good permadeath system is to make the player feel in control, and not feel complete sense of loss when permadeath occurs. Consider the analogy of a well-designed platformer. A well-designed platformer should not be trivial to complete: there should be some tricky jumps that require some skill in there, to get the player's adrenaline going. But ...


1

The question is what kind of game you want to make. MMORPGs typically depend heavily on grinding a single character for weeks, making progressing the only gameplay element of it. In this case killing a character is nothing but a punch into the guts, there is no value in it, it just needlessly punishes players. Well, first of all you could remove most of the ...


1

The inherent problem here is that your character's life is no longer in your hands. Gamers can be very competitive, and it only takes one person that decides to be a royal d*** to ruin the experience for everyone. Because of this, part of the question should be, "How do I ensure that players don't run wild perma - killing everyone they can?" Because of this, ...


1

Short answer: No there is no mud-engine that accepts any language. There is probably nothing at all that accepts 'ALL' languages (except for the keyboard and still I'm not sure). That said, I'd suggest that you make the core (the engine) in whatever language you want and then offer bindings to the most common languages used, for example: Lua Python Java ...


1

A bit of an old question, but in case you're looking, there's also this (started out as a simple text adventure engine and is now taking a MUD direction): https://github.com/crankycyclops/trogdor


1

Many of the MUDs I've worked on or played have had a basic aggressive/not-aggressive system. Adding faction-based aggression might add an interesting dimension (i.e. maybe Orcs are indifferent to you unless you've killed >100 of them, making you a famous villain to them). Allowing characters to build castles or strongholds and defend them, or to ...


1

I'm not sure what use you'd find with screenshots! Ultimately it's just plain text, and you are going to be given a menu which is a list of whatever is changeable for that entity. You pick your option, enter a new value, repeat. There are 3 or 4 different brands of OLC for MUDs and although the presentation is slightly different for each, they're all pretty ...



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