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32

"Delta", "d" or "Δ", means "difference" in a mathematical context. Whenever there's a difference difference between two numbers with similar meanings, that difference may be called a "delta", or a "d". Deltas are very common in game development. For example, the difference between a character's X-coordinate one second ago and its X-coordinate now can be ...


26

This is the "time delta." It's how much time has elapsed since the previous update. It's necessary to ensure that animations, physics, and so on are running at the right speed. The code is running once per frame update. However, there's no guarantee that frames are drawn at a constant speed. One frame might take 1/60th of a second and the next might ...


17

"The non-commercial Kinect SDK for Windows will be released this spring, Microsoft said, and a commercial version is planned for a later date. The company said the SDKs will include support for audio, the Kinect API and direct control of the sensor." That being said, if you don't want to wait, there's a lot of work being done on several fronts with ...


14

What's being shown as "FPS based" there is . . . well, basically, it's awful. It's pinning the game's speed to the performance of one particular computer. If you upgrade to a nice fast computer, your game will suddenly run in turbo speed, if you downgrade to a slower computer you'll be grinding around in slo-mo. The real choice is fixed time step vs. ...


9

http://www.computerandvideogames.com/article.php?id=258873?cid=OTC-RSS&attr=CVG-News-RSS Looks like for the moment it's only for select Microsoft partners.


7

This lag-vs-responsiveness issue is the situation with virtually all motion controllers, whether something like the Hydra, the Wii Remote, the Kinect, or the PlayStation Move. The problem is this: When an input stream is coming in, you're making a decision on a frame-by-frame basis about whether or not to trust the input data; whether the trends you're ...


5

Your description sounds more like the Kinect, though it doesn't have 4 cameras either. Maybe you're referring to a camera in each of the 4 Wii controllers. Wikipedia has a nice explanation of how the Wii controller works. A summary of the article: An optical sensor in the controller captures the infrared LEDs in the sensor bar. It then calculates its ...


5

OpenCV is developed by Intel and is open source, so that's always cool.


5

Edit Affine invariance requires this version of curvature apparently. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affine_curvature#Affine_curvature Assume that is what I am referring to. (Although normal curvature I think is invariant to rotations which could be good enough). Edit for a scale invariant version of curvature look here ...


4

In very broad terms, you probably want to define a gesture as a direction, followed by a [possibly very-short] delay, followed by another direction (and the relative angles between the directions, etc., until the end. For example, making a "t" with your wand (and don't forget that some people are lefties, so your definitions should not be hand-dependant!) ...


4

Wii uses 3 mechanisms to track its controller: infrared LEDs placed in a sensor bar accelerometer gyroscope (introduced in MotionPlus remotes) Basic implementation was a simple optical calculation of remote's orientation using infrared-sensitive "camera" on top of a controller. With MotionPlus gyroscope and accelerometer work together (similarly to a ...


3

dt (delta time) is the time between each cycle/render frame (or any time stamp you desire) of your loop. With this delta time we can stretch certain values over time. Just like in the real world we measure certain physics properties over time. Let's say we run our game 60 frames a second. If we want our our player to move 5 pixels per second we do 5 * ...


3

dt stands for delta time. It is used in the calculation of frame rate to insure the game runs at the same speed no matter what the frame rate is. More information on framerate independence can be found here.


3

You can calibrate the Kinect before using it. Like letting the patient stretch his arms, stand straight, just let him do some predefined poses. From this data you can calculate his skeleton and then use relative data to compare it. Another possible way would be to focus on angles at the joints. This may be a bit more unrelated to body size, but I don´t know ...


3

There's a button and virtual joystick implementation for cocos2d called "SneakyInput". Here's a tutorial that might help you use it.


3

In order to understand what motion controls might be good for, one should look at the way one uses the motion controller: Endurance - motion controls require more movement than using traditional controllers. This limits the length of the interaction with the game to the amount of time in which one gets physically tired from moving. This requires a motion ...


2

As Justing said, OpenCV. But if you want to get your feet wet quickly, I suggest you try dabbling with openFrameworks It has an addon that wraps OpenCV and you will learn a lot from it.


2

Kinect for Windows SDK Version 1 is now out (since February 2012) and includes commercial support, raw sensor streams, skeletal tracking, and a number of other improvements: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/kinectforwindows/


1

It feels weird to answer my own question, but I think I've found my solution. //Pseudo-Java update() { //deltaYaw is the change in yaw of the controller since last update //yawBuffer is initialized to zero, and only modified here //coneAngle is the stabilizing cone deltaYaw = getData().yaw; yawBuffer += deltaYaw; if ...


1

I think the most obvious point is that motion controls are analogs. Using an analog controllers as a digital controller is possible. But it's also less efficient : digital controllers are more responsive and less prone to failures. Unresponsive controllers are bad. Try playing a game like street fighter with an analog gamepad : it's terrible. I would say ...


1

This question is tagged Xbox360. While the current version of the SDK (v1-M6) is compatible with XNA, it is windows only, sadly you will have to wait for XBox support.


1

Latest news is that Microsoft will be coming out with a no0n-commercial version of an SDK for Kinect in Spring.Below is the link from Microsoft. http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/news/features/kinectforwindowssdk-022111.aspx


1

I asked the Team XNA about this a few weeks ago and they told me that currently that will not be available via the XNA Framework. I´m sure they´ll open the Kinect development some day, I just don´t think that will be soon.



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