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I was able to eliminate all of the GpuProgram warnings and also fix all of my animations by trial and error elimination of several shaders and additionally re-importing the models from Blender. Steps as follows. I set all of the models to use the standard shader in Unity. I then deleted and reloaded the offending shaders and did not have any errors, this ...


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I will tell you otherwise: Never leave anything underneath that shall never be visible. 3 reasons: If the rendering for some reason happens from back to front, the hidden surface may get rendered -> consumes fillrate & time. If the hidden suface is closeby underneath, it may cause z-fighting when seen from a slightly longer distance. This is superiorly ...


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Most models that one can buy at for example TurboSquid are mostly out of order, imho. The buyer must practically always fix it in multiple ways. Worst common annoyances: No model info/background given (what, where, real-world dimensions, mass, etc). May be needed for example for getting along with the physics, or to just find pictures of it/similar on the ...


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A game model's "cost" is determined by polygon count and vertex count. The term polygon is sometimes used as triangle in such measurements because GPUs only see vertices and triangles. There is never a 4+ sided polygon. A game model may stretch anywhere from 2 triangles for a billboard, to 40,000+ triangles for a player. When a model is exported to a game ...


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Games are very different, some accept polygons, some support multi-UV texturing, etc. In the end, it all depends on your target game and its requirements.


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To directly answer your main question, yes, you can draw lines connecting arbitrary coordinates in arbitrary ways in Unity. One of my favorite Unity assets for this is Vectrosity, and you can play with some of their wireframe-style demos here. I haven't used Vectrosity in a VR project yet myself, but I see no reason it wouldn't work, beyond the usual ...


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Solved my problem! I read an approach in XNA 3.0 Game Programming Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach, and adapted it to my needs. Here's the code if anybody is curious: Matrix4 upTransform = Matrix4.createRotateY(yrot); // find the height at the front, back, left, and right Vector3 frontLeft = upTransform.transform(new Vector3(-SCALE / 2, 0, ...



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