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1

Say for example that you have a team of 5 fighting a boss. The boss's actions/powers etc are hardcoded into the game code, but its decision making is based upon some probabilities, are those calculated server side and then distributed to all the players? For example, when it is going to use a specific "spell" or who it is even targeting. Sure it is. The ...


3

EVE Online, an MMO with a single shard and up to several thousand plaers in big space battles runs its physics on a 1 Hz tick, called the "destiny" tick. http://community.eveonline.com/news/dev-blogs/fixing-lag-drakes-of-destiny-part-1-1/ The so called "Bloodbath of B-R5RB" is the biggest emergent player fight ever to happen in an online game to date ("the ...


0

Most of the time, the size of the world doesn't matter as much as the number of players. For just 10 players, you can get away with a lot of things. Unless the world changes, syncing game states would be trivial. You could just have every player send their properties (i.e. position, rotation, health, etc.) to all the other players. If the world changes, ...


10

Besides the other good answers given, I want to add the fact that some physics commonly is not driven by the server or even know about by the server and is a common trick to make the world seem more rich without adding overhead to the networking or server side processing. For instance there might be debris you can kick around on the ground or blowing around ...


7

Second Life implements physics on the server side using Havok, and locks updates to 45 per second. https://community.secondlife.com/t5/General-Discussions/SIM-FPS-is-maxed-out-at-45/td-p/181120 Earlier versions around 2005-2006 let the physics updates float as high as the server would allow. An uncomplicated region with few scripted objects could run at ...


23

I've worked on a couple of game servers, including a suite of them for an MMO. In general, they don't have physics at all. In the few situations where physics are necessary (jumping, primarily) we let clients calculate their own physics, and we just deny anything that's too outlandish (players moving too fast for too long, going much higher than they ...


0

The typical way to do this is to send the new player the current state of the world / simulation, and then make sure and send any new events to them (even while they load into the map, to be processed when they are done loading) so that they are sure to be up to date. If this doesn't work for your needs for some reason though, let us know, since different ...


3

Two possible options might be: "big number" classes, such as this one, which represent arbitrarily large numbers through mathematics on arrays of integers used to simulate an appropriate storage space. hierarchy; that is, using a tiered coordinate system possibly represented by two integers per component; the first integer represents the position of (say) ...


1

An int64 is pretty huge (really!), but one way to deal with this sort of a problem is to have one coordinate set define what grid cell you are in (gridx, gridy) then another coordinate set to define the offset within that cell (offsetx, offsety). Note though that if you used 32 bit ints for the grid cell x and y, and 32 bit ints for the offset x and y, you ...


17

While ideal, it is practically improbable to validate every single input against the server, both in terms of computational load and latency in input confirmation for the client. Consequently there are usually a handful of things that aren't validated on the server in many MMOs. In some cases this includes certain classes of character movement, which is why ...


5

Many MMO's are designed with client-side hit prediction. So if there is a hit on the client, it sends that result to the server that there was a hit. In this case the server is not truly authoritative, and thus cheating is possible. To be honest, if I were designing an MMO, I would make the server fully authoritative, with the client only sending clamped ...


9

One of the reasons why there are protections is that reading the game state could allow bots to know the state of the game and act accordingly. For instance, grinding in a MMO: if the "bot" knows what mob is around, it can send commands to the game clients to select the mob, hit it until its life is 0, pick up the loot, rinse and repeat. With this, even if ...



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