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13

Honestly, it depends on the size and history of the team. Most of the large teams I've worked on have utilized an adapted version of Scrum. Often, a studio will bring in Scrum instructors or require producers to get "Scrum Master" certification. As noted above, Spiral is an option. Generally, some sort of Agile development is used that involves stand-ups, ...


13

It's probably safe to say that BDD, like TDD, or (insert trendy development buzzword-paradigm here) is used by some game developers somewhere, but they probably don't know they are nor would they neccessarily be able to identify what BDD actually means. The question is really how much they use it and how much do they have to use it for it to matter to you? ...


11

I don't think TDD, as such, is appropriate as a foundation for game development. Automated unit testing as part of methodology, sure, but too many of the key concerns of game development are subjective and not machine-testable for testing to be the driver of development. How are you going to write a scripted test for whether a game mechanic is fun? That a ...


11

I'll write a proper answer since i was at your stage about 2 months ago. I begun writing a very simple game engine so that I can learn OpenGL 3.x better but since my inexperience and my sparse knowledge of how a 3D game should be designed, I usually get into problems where I realize that I should have designed my classes differently. Don't worry ...


10

The time spent eliminating false paths is not wasted. It's time well spent, learning about what the right design is for your particular game. If you're willing to throw that out, that puts you WAY ahead of the game compared to most novice designers. Think of it this way. When you first set out to make a new game, you either know EXACTLY what mechanics work ...


10

It's certainly viable, although a lot of game programmers haven't really gotten on board with the idea yet, or have a good understanding of how to test complicated systems. I admit myself that I rarely use it, except for non-gameplay-related systems that are easy to test. Expect to use a lot of mock objects. Because of how tied together a lot of systems ...


8

I think asking for "simplest most effective" is an unrealistic requirement, but there are certainly a few good approaches. Rather than go into detail, I'll link to an article: http://www.lifewithalacrity.com/2006/01/ranking_systems.html This covers: ELO an ELO variant by Days of Wonder TrueSkill (and glicko, which it appears to be based on or at least ...


6

It's a bit difficult to work out exactly what you're asking since the title is purely about TDD but you seem to be making Scrum an integral part of the question too - and as I understand it, one does not require the other. If I believe this GD question, TDD is not much of a use in game development. That is correct. I don't think I've ever heard of it ...


6

Build a game and not an engine. You're getting caught up in what you inevitably get caught up in when you're making an engine: you have no specific requirements and you have no idea what will be most useful or pleasant, or how it will impact using your engine or your game's performance. You also have no way to know. Build a game, and the game will tell you ...


5

Try using Flash Develop or if you are willing to spend some money Flash Builder. I have used both and would say they are comparable. Flash Builder is an Eclipse plug-in meaning it can integrate with the rest of your workflow a little better, but it is quite expensive. Another alternative is to download the Flex SDK (will likely need to do that for Flash ...


5

Imagine writing a book. If you can put together a very short story about your character (1-2 pages), hand it off to somebody and they start to feel for this character, you win... Your goal is developing a full-blown character that you could see in the real world. That means you are going to want to break down every component of a real world person into bits ...


5

I like to analyze any ideas of mine that don't seem fun and break them down into a few components. The reason behind this is that there's probably SOMETHING you can salvage from any given failed game project for a future one. Maybe the arena combat gameplay doesn't match with your theme of atmospheric horror. Maybe most of the game is generic crap but ...


4

I wholeheartedly recommend Better game characters by design: a psychological approach by Katherine Isbister http://books.google.com/books?id=TGBTzVj47ZcC It covers the whole design process, from cultural preferences to physical features, in exhaustive details. It also differentiates PC design from NPC design, details the psycho-sociological aspects of each ...


4

There are a number of growing companies that work with minimal studio time and people from across the globe. A lot of flash programmers from what I've seen have adopted this method as the artist usually lives in a different time zone than the programmer etc. I believe the project Natural Selection 2 which is coming out this Halloween was made almost ...


4

Not everyone is the same. Some people flourish under light management while others just waste their time (and that of those around them). If you have a team in place, get to know what motivates each of them and go from there.


4

Well they don't use something like a UIScrollView, that's for sure. You would just move the camera over a stationary world or move the world under a stationary camera. I'm a little rusty on my GL, but I would guess you just push a new translation matrix before all your drawing. For the actual dragging part, you would also implement that yourself. It ...


4

A scroller is quite simple a "virtual viewport" that pushes new tiles/objects in from direction you are scrolling. Simple example to see this, is to build a simple 1 line marquee(textscroller). Lets for example purpose say we have a line with 20 characters/letters/chars. We place them in an string/array like: String viewport = "...................."; ...


4

Here's a case study from someone who thinks TDD and gamedev mix pretty well: http://powertwenty.com/kpd/downloads/TestDrivenDevelopmentInPython.pdf Admittedly, this is a small project in Pygame, but it gives the idea of which parts can be tested with a graphical game and which can't. I was surprised at how much could be done with TDD in this scenario.


4

There's no easy answer, without your knowing what sort of strengths and weaknesses you actually want... And I'm guessing this is part of the problem. You really don't need any fancy formulas (yet?). Start with simple arithmetic and take it from there. It's actually those very numbers that give your game a unique feel in terms of how it plays. Before you go ...


3

Depends on the game. There are a few problems you can get into: For games that have a luck component and a skill component (Bridge, Poker, Magic:the Gathering, etc.), most algorithms don't account for the fact that a weaker player can sometimes get lucky. If your game falls into this category, you'll need to do some work. Generally this means figuring out ...


3

For developing a web game, i'd actually recommend learning HaXe. It has much friendlier syntax than ActionScript, as well as many more features you'll likely want (generics, automatic performance optimization, extra useful libraries, etc.). As Alex pointed out, FlashDevelop is a great tool to use and seems to be quite capable.


3

The Spiral model is very popular for game development. Due to the fast changing development cycle and the size of most game projects. Since game development is a living project and most game projects are not defined well before the project starts. The spiral model allows for fast changes and flexible development.


3

You said that the game you're imagining "looks like it would be really fun." When you close your eyes and imagine yourself playing the game, imagine every detail of how you're playing it. Is it still fun? Where's the fun? Then how is that not matching up with what you're prototyping? If it's not really fun, move on. If it is, just make your real-life ...


3

This varies widely between projects from my experience. My biggest rule is to keep your code consistent. If you choose a particular style, make sure all the code follows that style. As for a "CRUD" equivalent, I haven't seen one, although I like the idea of trying to come up with a unified model for this.


3

sorry for my poor english and sorry for my biased point of view: i am not a game designer but a coder. I think there are some misunderstanding in this discussion. i'll talk about TDD in more general form, the so called BDD. Behavior driven development is not a way to test project (the tests are something like side effects). BDD is a way to design, a way to ...


3

The only real way we have to test such things is with, well, testing. Professional game developers will tell you all the time that the single most effective way to know if certain gameplay is working and fun is to give it to players and observe. Indeed, one of the reasons that achievements are everywhere these days in games is because they give invaluable ...


3

Balance is mostly attained by intuition and play testing. Games where balance is important usually have extended beta cycles and frequent updates because of this. In your specific example "Magic" attains balance through years of experience in play balancing - if they find that they have released an unbalanced deck they might come up with a ruleset to address ...


3

IF using C++ I would start with an existing solution that is feature full and fast. Such as openscenegraph In general though I think most people would agree that a tree structured hierarchy is a good way to implement the things you refer to. Except for instancing. For this (Geometry, materials, etc) you would change the Tree into a DAG or Graph of nodes. ...



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