Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Particle effects which are procedurally calculated by the game engine have the advantage that they can interact with the world: Particles which collide with objects can either bounce off or disappear. A precalculated animation would just pass through any obstacles Particles emitted by a moving object can stay where they are while the object moves on. This ...


0

Perhaps, some custom animation will require a bit of coding. Usually, particles in engines are physically simulated instances. Wıth this option you have more control over your particles as particles are now dynamic entities that you have direct control over.


3

Most professional modelers have little expectation that the model in-game is going to look exactly like it does in Maya. The engineers have a very strong responsibility to provide tools for very quickly visualizing models using the game's rendering engine. This may be by allowing models to be re-loaded in game so there's no long shutdown/startup process to ...


1

3D modeling software packages like Maya usually include a great variety of options for rendering. For instance, Maya itself includes several software and hardware-accelerated renderers, and 3rd party renderer plugins can be used. Different renderers have different features and support different effects, but for the most part, they're designed for ...


1

so surely the game engines needs the same render as Mayas to reproduce the effects created in Maya? They don't need to be the same, only the results need to be the same. Since you seem to think Maya's the reference, you can call what you see in Maya the expected result of a renderer rendering what is contained in the model. Break the renderer's stuff ...



Top 50 recent answers are included