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4

It depends what kind of cutscene you want. Some games have a comic book style cutscene where images would be the best option. Unless you're trying to actually make a 30 fps video out of images. Then a video would be the way to go. A third option is to actually do it in game by using the character models and animating those. This gives a smooth transition ...


2

Try this: CCSize winSize = CCDirector::sharedDirector()->getWinSize(); CCSprite* test = CCSprite::create("Ball.png", CCRectMake(0, 0, 80, 80) ); test->setPosition( ccp(winSize.width * 0.5, winSize.height * 0.5) ); this->addChild(test); It works for me. also try using this sizes: CCSize visibleSize = ...


2

C:\Marmalade\6.0.6\tools\UIBuilder\Readme.txt The Marmalade Studio UI Builder has been removed from the Marmalade SDK. This means it is no longer a supported part of the product. We have removed the UI Builder because we believe that, going forwards, it is better for the Marmalade UI runtimes to support a standard UI markup rather than our ...


1

1) iOS and most mobile device needs main thread to call OpenGL ES commands. So there is no way you can move them out, So in our case, the main thread will always concentrate only on drawing. 2) While, the main thread is busy drawing, we use another thread for Game Physics and collision logics. If the game uses very complex physics, then we use more ...


1

Setting "extrude: 1" in TP, then CIwMaterial::ALPHA_NONE/DEFAULT for the alpha mode of the material that the sprites are rendered off solves the problem.


1

Jumping is an operation that you need to have take effect over time, not an instantaneous modification to the player location. To make a realistic jump, you're going to want to take into account: Velocity Gravity (an acceleration downward) Time Player height (i.e., y coordinate) The relationship between these will be something like this: pos_y = ...


1

There's a XML UI builder available for Marmalade too. You can check it out here.


1

This function can create 4 different OpenGL textures (red, green, blue, or chessboard) programmatically, of size VIEW_TEX_SIZE x VIEW_TEX_SIZE. It returns the texture ID. GLuint colourTexture(int colour) { GLubyte image[VIEW_TEX_SIZE][VIEW_TEX_SIZE][3]; // RGB storage for (int i = 0; i < VIEW_TEX_SIZE; i++) { for (int j = 0; j < ...


1

In addition to DevilWithin's answer using FBOs, you can also use glCopyTex(Sub)Image2D if FBOs are not supported (which may be the case on an ES 1.0 device, don't know). This invloves a copy, but only a single GPU-GPU copy, since it copies the current framebuffer directly into the texture. But by any means don't do a glReadPixels followed by a glTexImage2D.


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You're looking for a frame buffer object (FBO). If you're buffer generating doesn't need anything too complex, you can just do as you said..


1

The question is quite old, but I think it's better to answer an unanswered question than just leave it. Android doesn't need a loop to continuously render the views, it automatically invalidates the views at each frame. Marmalade doesn't follow this approach. You need a game loop in Marmalade which runs once every frame. The approach I follow and which ...


1

this is a post quite old but I got an answer for you. To easily work with Marmalade in the game field I would suggest you to use the brand new engine called IwGame (http://www.drmop.com/index.php/iwgame-engine/). I'm working for the porting of an Android game of mine and I started 2 months ago. It's really simple to learn and it's powerful. It's build on ...



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