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2

There are a multitude of 3D projections out there with different properties and any 3D modelling tool worth its salt ought to be able to configure the cameras to achieve those looks. A perspective projection like the one you have used have diminishing widths and heights as you go further away, which will result in the trapezoid shape that you illustrate. ...


2

Two approaches I think help were used in 1996's Duke Nukem 3D. Provide multiple routes to get to a key location. In the first level of the shareware episode, you need to get into the projection room of the cinema to get the red keycard. You can get there either by going up the stairs from a door in the lobby, or by going through the air vent in the ...


1

You don't necessarily have to change the rooms themselves if you can change what objects are in the room when the player backtracks. As a quick example, one of the lairs in Neverwinter Online has a room that's basically empty (although it has two locked doors). As you advance through the lair, you encounter a boss that drops a key, and the door behind the ...


2

There are several techniques that can help improve player experience. Rule 1 - Inaccessible areas: Make it impossible for the player to explore all of the area first time round. If backtracking is an intentional part of the game, making sub-areas of a location inaccessible first time round is an excellent way to stretch out the interest in the area. When ...


3

There has been a lot of suggestions in terms of powerups, time decay and ETC. My opinion is a mixture of all of these elements to form a living breathing world that can be both cheap and expensive for development depending on the level of complexity and scale. However, there has been too much emphasis on going backwards. It's not just about going back, but ...


1

For solvable puzzles, it's often easy to just play the game in reverse, starting from a solved state and un-making moves either planned or at random (or in an editor.) Sokoban fits this approach very well, and will be much easier to implement than an exclude-and-solve strategy.


5

In Portal, the developers intentionally introduced back tracking into the game. They did this for a couple of reasons: Player Immersion: It happens after you have broken out of the initial portion of the game and have been running around 'behind the scenes'. Bringing you back reminds you that you are still stuck in the facility, still 'in' the game. It ...


1

If you have design space for platformer elements, you could create topology that makes moving backwards a different problem than forwards. For example, lots of jumps and tricks to get to the top of a cliff such that getting back down without falling to death is distinctly different. You might try doing this passively via gravity (ex. jumping to platform ...


3

Time! Let the environment develop over time. Time is a resource that's missed by pretty much all games throughout time and genres. Small, random, changes to the environment, over time, can lead to massive changes. Letting time and some randomness guide the development of the games environment also increases replay value and it can do so quite a lot, ...


2

The best approach to backtracking to make the player feel like the area they are backtracking through has progressed slightly timewise. Were there two NPCs arguing in the village? Have them in a fistfight when the player backtracks. Did the player destroy a wall? Crumble some of the infrastructure around to show the damage they did. Did they summon a ...


9

One thing I hated about backtracking in Metroid Prime was how when I first came across something new and interesting, I couldn't tell if I had the tools to interact with it or not. I'd leave, hoping I'd get the tools later. But then I'd hit a dead end. Then I'd wonder if I had the tools to navigate the dead end, if I was missing something, or if I had to go ...


4

What you are talking about is not easy to do. If you are going to send the player back through an area then you can still make a lot more game experience there by making new things happen on their journey back. Consider the original Halo where the second half of the game was effectively a fight back through the locations of the first half, but confronted by ...


11

You said that modifying the level beyond recognition is out of the question, but what about only small, randomized modifications to levels? This can be in form of events which only have a certain chance of happening whenever the player traverses the area. When there are multiple such events which also interact with each other, it will result in a slightly ...


22

One thing I liked about the backtracking in Super Metroid is how your new powers allowed you to get through the areas faster, but in a more challenging way. Another way is to place items such as health upgrades (or obvious switches/breakable blocks) in plain sight but out of reach until you come back in possession of another item. The best example of this ...



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