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There are a multitude of 3D projections out there with different properties and any 3D modelling tool worth its salt ought to be able to configure the cameras to achieve those looks. A perspective projection like the one you have used have diminishing widths and heights as you go further away, which will result in the trapezoid shape that you illustrate. ...


2

Two approaches I think help were used in 1996's Duke Nukem 3D. Provide multiple routes to get to a key location. In the first level of the shareware episode, you need to get into the projection room of the cinema to get the red keycard. You can get there either by going up the stairs from a door in the lobby, or by going through the air vent in the ...


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You don't necessarily have to change the rooms themselves if you can change what objects are in the room when the player backtracks. As a quick example, one of the lairs in Neverwinter Online has a room that's basically empty (although it has two locked doors). As you advance through the lair, you encounter a boss that drops a key, and the door behind the ...


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There are several techniques that can help improve player experience. Rule 1 - Inaccessible areas: Make it impossible for the player to explore all of the area first time round. If backtracking is an intentional part of the game, making sub-areas of a location inaccessible first time round is an excellent way to stretch out the interest in the area. When ...


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There has been a lot of suggestions in terms of powerups, time decay and ETC. My opinion is a mixture of all of these elements to form a living breathing world that can be both cheap and expensive for development depending on the level of complexity and scale. However, there has been too much emphasis on going backwards. It's not just about going back, but ...


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For solvable puzzles, it's often easy to just play the game in reverse, starting from a solved state and un-making moves either planned or at random (or in an editor.) Sokoban fits this approach very well, and will be much easier to implement than an exclude-and-solve strategy.



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