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2

I wish I could add a comment, but I can't since I have under 50 Rep, so I guess I'll put it here. A question very similar to this was asked and answered on the RPG Stack Exchange and I think you'd benefit a lot from reading it. First and foremost, I AM NOT A LAWYER, so nothing I say, should be taken as solid legal advice. IN GENERAL: That linked answer ...


1

Use a program like "Musescore" and copy the sheet music from classical music into the program. As long as the creator dead for 80 years. Should be ok if you've made your own version.


0

I would say that you could, as public domain means that it's free to be used, however I'm not too sure as far as Moral Rights/Authors Rights are concerned. Wikipedia says that moral rights (sometimes called "authors rights") are rights retained by the author of a work, even if they no longer hold the copyright. They include the right of attribution (or of ...


0

I (not a lawyer) think the correct answer is a little more nuanced. Taking the "Alice in Wonderland" example, the original publication (old edition, paper book) is indeed yours to do whatever you want with. But if you take the xyz publisher's 99'th edition E-Book (or Audio Book, or Book Book), that derivative work can be protected by its own copyright. ...


1

For anybody that is alive you need explicit permission from the person even if you are going to mock them, there's no way around it, I know shows like south park do a lot of these things and is able to get away with it, but it's just because most "victims" ignore it to avoid the Streisand effect (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streisand_effect). People might ...


1

I'm not a game developer, but I just happened to stumble across your question. I am a writer and journalist, and I've written about copyright many times in the past. If you're specifically thinking of Alice in Wonderland, the answer to your question is an unqualified YES. The book is old enough that the copyright has expired everywhere in the world, so you ...


0

Mozilla Public License Version 2.0(MPLv2) is a FSF-approved open source license. It prohibits changes to the MPLv2 licensed code without redistribution of the MPLv2 code but is non-viral. It can be likened to a more reasonable LGPL.


7

Public domain content is by definition not copyrighted (anymore), so it is perfectly acceptable to use that. However, there are some things to keep in mind: Copyright terms are not universal. What is public domain in one country might not be public domain in another. You should confirm the copyright durations / public domain status of the material in your ...


-3

I couldn't say anything about the issue in legal terms, but there's another way to look at it. You could count the amount of effort it has taken to create the work. While you examine the works you see available on the net, good measurement unit is the amount of effort spent to create the work. If you create a game, and half the content is copied from ...


1

To answer the wording of the question: You will never go to prison or have to pay a fine for including a video character from another universe in your game. In that sense, it's not illegal. You might however be liable to claims of the copyright owner for licenses or damages. What's worse, the copyright owner can file charges against you even if there's no ...


4

"Would I run into any legal trouble if I included an out of print book in the public domain, such as Pride and Prejudice or Alice in Wonderland?" Careful there, out of print has nothing to do with public domain. A book can be public domain and still be in print, or it can be out of print without being public domain. Also, a book can be public domain in one ...


10

Watch for different copyright terms in different countries. Just because a book's copyright has expired in your country does not mean it has expired in all countries in which you plan to distribute the game. Though the Berne Convention sets a minimum copyright term of 50 years after the death of the author, countries are free to set a longer copyright term. ...


21

Yes and no. "Public domain" does mean that, by definition, you can do whatever you like with that creative property. However there's an important caveat here. What's public domain is the underlying story, not every specific creative work based on that story. So, like, you could have a book titled Alice in Wonderland, but its cover can't be Disney's Alice in ...


33

Getting legal advice on GameDev.StackExchange is not a great idea. Having said that, if a work is truly in the public domain, you can do whatever you want with it.


2

A printer service probably don't want to print such cards. I am not a lawyer, but the way it has been explained to me is that from a legal perspective, they print the cards and sell them to you. If you have them print cards of your design you basically license them to print that design on a set of cards. The printer could be in legal trouble if they print ...



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