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33

Getting legal advice on GameDev.StackExchange is not a great idea. Having said that, if a work is truly in the public domain, you can do whatever you want with it.


27

I am not a lawyer, and you should seek out an actual lawyer for a proper legal consultation. That said, the terms of the license seem pretty clear. You may cancel your subscription, at which point you are not entitled to future updates of the engine, but you can still use the version you have: After cancellation of your Subscription by either you or ...


21

Yes and no. "Public domain" does mean that, by definition, you can do whatever you like with that creative property. However there's an important caveat here. What's public domain is the underlying story, not every specific creative work based on that story. So, like, you could have a book titled Alice in Wonderland, but its cover can't be Disney's Alice in ...


20

It can be assumed that all non-trivial software contains bugs. Unreal Engine 4 has a bugtracker here. Unity has a bugtracker here. If you browse these sites you can see the many known issues with these engines. The licensing agreements for these engines (and most software generally) will contain clauses similar to this: No Warranty. THE ...


14

From the Unity FAQ: Can we sell games and make money with the free version of Unity? Yes you can create and sell a game with the free version of Unity, without paying royalties or any revenue share. However, the free version of Unity may not be licensed by a commercial entity with annual gross revenues (based on fiscal year) in excess of ...


10

Watch for different copyright terms in different countries. Just because a book's copyright has expired in your country does not mean it has expired in all countries in which you plan to distribute the game. Though the Berne Convention sets a minimum copyright term of 50 years after the death of the author, countries are free to set a longer copyright term. ...


9

Short answer, yes. Of course, only your lawyer can advise you of your legal risk in civil matters like this. However, a reasonable person should not be at risk of brand confusion - which is the question a court would have to answer in that case, as this more aptly falls under trademark which protects symbols identifying things with business value, as ...


9

I'm fairly certain that no, you cannot take legal action against the creators of software because of a bug. I'm not even sure how you get this idea, and what specifically you would sue them for. There are known bugs (as Kelly said), and probably also unknown ones, but you have to think about the likelyhood of you even encountering these bugs, and even then ...


7

I am based in Japan, and I registered on Valve as a sole proprietor, with a secondary personal bank account (to keep the numbers separated), and with the default tax settings. I have not ran into any problems yet, but I'm not qualified to give legal or financial advice either in Japan, and much less in Russia. THIS IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE To be honest with you, ...


7

Public domain content is by definition not copyrighted (anymore), so it is perfectly acceptable to use that. However, there are some things to keep in mind: Copyright terms are not universal. What is public domain in one country might not be public domain in another. You should confirm the copyright durations / public domain status of the material in your ...


6

It depends. You should consult a lawyer for each case to be sure (in particular since there are intellectual property laws beyond copyright that may or may not be involved, such as trademarks and - though it is unlikely - patents); I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. If you have a character who sneaks around, and you have an Easter egg where ...


5

There is no requirement. Copyright is automatic the moment you produce a creative work. An explicit copyright notice is optional and not required to claim a copyright later. It is just a friendly reminder of who the copyright owner is and that they care about the copyright of their work. When you want one, you can place it anywhere you like. When someone ...


4

When in doubt, always talk to a lawyer. People on this website are not qualified to give legal advice. That includes me, so don't come back and sue me for giving you incorrect information. That said, you have to copy something to be breaking any copyright laws. If you're using the music files in-place on the player's computer, you can't be infringing on any ...


4

"Would I run into any legal trouble if I included an out of print book in the public domain, such as Pride and Prejudice or Alice in Wonderland?" Careful there, out of print has nothing to do with public domain. A book can be public domain and still be in print, or it can be out of print without being public domain. Also, a book can be public domain in one ...


4

By default, you have exclusive copyright for every creative work you produce, which means nobody is allowed to distribute it except you unless you give them explicit permission. The purpose of a license is to give the end-user rights they would normally not have. So when you don't add any license terms whatsoever, it means your end-users have no right to ...


3

First, to get money legaly in Russia, you should registrate yourself as an Individual Entrepreneur. Under this procedure you will choose a Tax option and create a specific bank account. After this you close all your questions. And for currency - you can choose currency for your bank account, and if you choose roubles, income money will be changed to roubles ...


3

No. Concepts are not copyrighted. If you use art from another game, that probably is copyrighted. Given how many games actually intentionally copy previous games in very deliberate ways for the purpose of trying to sell well like the other games did, any humorous or nostalgic references should be far safer, as long as they aren't copying specific ...


3

When you don't want any problems with anybody, don't copy other peoples intellectual properties. Even when you assume you are technically in the right (fair use, notable differences and all), they might still sue. In most parts of the world, civil lawsuits aren't like criminal lawsuits. You won't get an attorney for free and defending yourself as a ...


2

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ according to this website you can use it commercially but it needs to have same license, see the sharealike. i don't know about game but website will be i think totally legal, if you of course upload edited image with cc license but please ask someone else too. I'm not expert in licenses


2

When you reproduce a song yourself (making a cover song and not using the original recording), you owe a royalty to the composer of that piece. If you want to use your version without breaking the copyright and paying anything, you need a written permission from the composer. Since you are reproducing the song this license is called a mechanical license. It ...


2

Disclaimer: IANAL! (I am not a laywer!) A very strict definition of a commercial application is "an application made with the intent to earn money". Clearly adds are inserted into game to make money, so if the license on the icons disallows commercial use you cannot use them.


2

OpenAL is an open standard (meaning anyone can read and use it) with several implementations, some of which are proprietary (generally patent protected). OpenAL Soft is one such implementation which is under the LGPL. Creative Technology maintains another confusingly called just OpenAL, which is now proprietary. You must obtain a license from the developer ...


2

I am not a lawyer, but as a software developer and occasional artist, I've investigated this a bit so I know what I can do to protect my work and also so I don't accidentally screw myself over. While it would help to know what country you're in, because different countries have different laws that may also affect you, I'll make an attempt at answering your ...


2

A printer service probably don't want to print such cards. I am not a lawyer, but the way it has been explained to me is that from a legal perspective, they print the cards and sell them to you. If you have them print cards of your design you basically license them to print that design on a set of cards. The printer could be in legal trouble if they print ...


2

I wish I could add a comment, but I can't since I have under 50 Rep, so I guess I'll put it here. A question very similar to this was asked and answered on the RPG Stack Exchange and I think you'd benefit a lot from reading it. First and foremost, I AM NOT A LAWYER, so nothing I say, should be taken as solid legal advice. IN GENERAL: That linked answer ...


1

To answer the wording of the question: You will never go to prison or have to pay a fine for including a video character from another universe in your game. In that sense, it's not illegal. You might however be liable to claims of the copyright owner for licenses or damages. What's worse, the copyright owner can file charges against you even if there's no ...


1

From the Google Wallet ToS: By agreeing to the Agreement, You represent the following: You are 13 to 17 years of age and creating a Google Wallet account for the sole and limited purpose of redeeming Google Play Gift Card value for select items that are eligible for purchase by You on Google Play, subject to applicable laws and upon Google's ...


1

In the long term you will not get around taking some financial risks. When your project becomes a failure, separating your personal financial future from that of your company will allow you to sleep much better at night. The exact laws which govern limited companies differ drastically between different countries. That means a definite answer is not possible ...


1

Hmm, you raised an actually interesting point there, but what do you actually mean by the term legal action? That does matter a lot in this case. And another thing, the creators of those engines aren't forcing you to use their engines. So it won't be possible that you can take an action on them. The only thing that you are able to do is to report a bug to ...


1

Anything derived from using a CC-BY-SA licensed work should be distributed under the same license. This includes the edited image and the work it is used in. Since you are mixing it with other things (other images, music, code) to create a new work (a game), the new work should carry the same license. In short, if you use a CC-BY-SA licensed image to make a ...



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