Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

There are several sections of the Unity End-User License Agreement (which is for version 4.x as I write this, although earlier versions are similar) that pertaining to this issue. The most directly relevant is section 3, which reads (in part): You will not delete or in any manner alter any Unity or third-party copyright, trademark or other ...


15

The likelihood of this approach producing the results you want is effectively zero. First, if you have built your prototype using the actual IP, then you have almost certainly committed (in most jurisdictions) copyright infringement or some similar IP law violation -- it doesn't matter that you have kept the project private. It's unlikely that the IP holder ...


13

People I have worked with have done this before. First time: programmer who worked for me made a PC version of a board game (I made some art for it just because it was a fun little project). This was 25 years ago. He approached the rights holders, a large toy company. They had no idea what to do with the game, and after a few months of considering it they ...


11

Public things like: country names, state names, county names, city names, street names, etc., are not trademarked or copyright protected. There are no licensing agreements required to use them. See Public Domain


10

Even though hacking the APK seems easy but it will definitely not run, the other option I believe is to upgrade to the Unity Pro version and I found on some research onto it. See links: Answer from the Unity 3D page Forums Documents about splash screen


8

While the letter X is not copy protected, the specific cross used on the controller, along with the other shapes: , are trademarked. Using your own art to represent the buttons (as in your example image), should be OK under fair use, specifically nominative fair use. Where the qualifications for nominative fair use are one of the following situations: ...


8

This should be legal, but be careful where your music is coming from. If you're using sound samples provided by software you need to ensure it's OK to use those sound samples. There's something in music composition called Sampling. This is taking small bits of other music and re-using it in your own. The legal issues surrounding sampling are a grey area, ...


4

Regarding using names When one releases a game commercially, they usually register a trademark for that name and product category. When one registers a trademark, nobody else may use that name for their product, when that product falls into the same product category. You can use the patent trademark database of the US patent and trademark office to check if ...


4

Yes, you can as long as you license the engine, with terms permitting it. The version of Source that comes with the games that you purchase is for modding those existing games, and you won't be able to produce executables with it (and if you do manage to, you're going to run into some other more costly problems). Interested in licensing Source, refer to ...


4

The final shipped game generally looks better than the earliest footage, but our audiences aren't always sensitive to that when evaluating early peeks at a game. These lines aren't legal protection so much as a gesture to temper the "this game looks like shit" reaction. By overlaying it on the frame, they ensure that if any secondary source - like a video ...


4

Are there any legal ways to acquire the rights to make a derivative video game? Yes, it's frequently done. The game is owned by a live company, so how would I contact them correctly and negotiate for the rights to the content? Find their contact information on the web. Typically with a "Contact Us" page. You're likely not going to find a "Use ...


4

Copyright is about copying, not only distribution. Courts have ruled that even loading a program into memory is copying and subject to limitations on copyright. IANAL but I think you would probably be OK, although it is a murky situation. By requiring the other game to be present you are in essence creating a derivative work containing your code and the ...


3

To add to Josh Petrie's answer when you want to use someone's copyright you have to negotiate with them, if you already have your game you can't really go back and will have to take whatever deal they offer you and they know this. This makes first making a game and then getting copyright a great way to lose any potential income/be forced to ask money for it ...


3

IANAL, this is not legal advice, gamedev.SE is not a good site for legal Q&A. You may have noticed that most promotional material either avoids mentioning competitors, or avoids mentioning them by name. Example (Colgate): "Tastes better than the leading competitor" I believe this issue is covered on the Wikipedia article Comparative Advertising. ...


3

The names of sports teams names are usually trademarks of their owning corporation or entity, as are the logos. You cannot use them as teams in your games without permission. This is a legal matter; you should contact your lawyer for definitive advice.


2

So far I've encountered the term "Donation" for "Cash shop payment" only among amateurs who host smaller games in their free-time (often half-legal private servers which emulate the server software of commercial MMORPGs). Anyone who is an actual professional uses the term "payment" and is proud of it. Many amateur MMORPGs want to keep up the image of a ...


2

Concepts are not copyright, assets are. Names are also not copyright, but they can be trademarked. Logos are copyright. In the U.S., you don't have to apply for copyright, it is implicit when you create content. You can make whatever you want as long as you are not copying assets or infringing upon trademarks. You can rip as many ideas as you like. Ideas ...


2

You can't copyright ideas or game mechanics. That much should be obvious from the number of "clone" games around. So you can make a game that exactly followed Quidditch rules without much worry. Use of copyrighted material (whole chunks of Harry Potter's text explaining the rules of Quidditch, for example) is generally not possible without the copyright ...


2

I have spoke to the "right people" at a couple of studios that own IP for large/successful IP typically in the TV/film space, and asked them if they want to use their IP in one of our super, cool, amazing, etc. projects - a great opportunity for them I thought. Their response has been go off and make the game with our own IP, when it has been a proven ...


1

No, not generally. Not without permission. Gambling and stats sites are a different case. There's a difference between using someone's name in a factual article about that person and using their name and likeness in a FIFA-like game. Minor spelling variations are not enough, otherwise we'd all be playing Lorrd of teh Ringz games.


1

There is no legal obligation to do so. There is no Apple TOS obligation to do so. And I will disagree with the other answer and say: There is no moral obligation to do so. The only way to know why they decided to put this message up would be to ask them. But I suspect it is to let people know that they can buy IAPs to speed things up. It's advertising. On ...


1

Copyright is only about distribution, not about use. When you obtained copyrighted content, you are free to do whatever you want with it, as long as you don't give it away to others. Also, when you obtain copyrighted content from somewhere, you aren't violating the copyright. The violation is committed by the person who distributes the content without ...


1

Great question, what better way to ask about copyright than through games, which encompass all forms of media and IP. First off, be aware that an idea cannot be patented. Second be aware that the copyright depends on the national law you are recommended to adhering as a natural citizen. There are for instance some difference in interpretation of Fair Use in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible