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24

It's not easy to ignore whether or not this is a good idea, but I will do my best to suppress my need to facepalm and concentrate on the pure technical viability. PDF has Javascript support to add interactive elements to a document. This could be used to implement simple games. But you can't just take a game you implemented in some other technology and ...


9

Yes, some parts need to be really fast. Now are these part written in Java slow? Did you measure and considered that it would really be an improvement to figure out how to plug everything that needs to go fast in native language? This seems to me like it's premature optimization. Unless you realize that these parts are really a bottleneck and that the only ...


6

I would create a directory containing language text files. The directory could look like this: en.txt 0 "Start game" 1 "Load game" 2 "Enable cannons" 3 "Join server" 4 "Kill the enemy" fr.txt 0 "Démarrer le jeu" 1 "Load game" 2 "Activer canons" 3 "Rejoignez serveur" 4 "Tuer l'ennemi" de.txt 0 "Spiel starten" 1 "Spiel laden" 2 "Enable Kanonen" ...


6

You should be able to insert a flash .swf file from your computer or the internet into a PDF using adobe acrobat. The content can run on the PDF page or in a "floating window". Although there are different security settings from normal web based flash that may prevent your game from running. Here is an article on embedding flash content: ...


2

Writing engines in multiple languages that work together can offer many benefits, but almost always results in higher complexity and higher cost for maintenance. For your first engine, you want to deliver a finished and working product, so the most important thing is to keep complexity down. Java is fast enough. Another way to look at it is this: No ...


2

Here are 2 common ways games save space when communicating strings over the network or serializing to disk. Zlib the text or use some other compression algorithm (even just Huffman compression). You can compress the text with a pre-shared compression header so that the header doesn't add to the size. If there are common strings you have to send or ...


1

There are a lot of engines that work this way. The important thing is to make sure you don't transition from one language to the other too often as there is usually a cost there.



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