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8

Since you have the replay system in place, I'd suggest you only store the replay-data during gameplay and then render a video from that replay offline. Eg. after the game has finished and the user chooses to post the replay as video, then you would render the video from the replay-data (by playing the replay and using glReadPixels).


8

Unity 3d - I've played around with the engine on PC and Mac, but not the iPad/iPhone. I have used games on the iPod touch made with this engine though. Works very well from what I've seen. Unity iPhone 1.7 works with the iPad. You can use basic Unity3D for free to develop/prototype a game, then upgrade/buy the iPhone version.


7

There are only two engines I know of that work on iPhone, Android, and in a browser: Unity and ShiVa 3D. Does anyone have an idea of the size of the task to migrate from one 3D engine to another? This isn't an answerable question as-is. How much code you have and what engine you're using are going to matter. I don't know about Shiva, but in Unity ...


5

Unsurprisingly, the Ogre guys have a cut down template project that you can use as a basis to build Ogre XCode projects. If you have downloaded and installed the SDK (i.e. haven't built the source yourself), you can just install the Ogre XCode templates and they will build and run out of the box. If you have built the source from the Mercurial repo, you ...


5

There is no mention of such in the app store review guidelines; however you are strongly encouraged to comply with the iOS HIG which, among other things, suggests never quitting programmatically and always being ready to stop in response to the Home button (iOS Developer account required to view those links, I think). Because of the above, I would not be ...


5

The displays are the same. Meaning that you'll have 1024x768 pixels on both models. So you can use the same assets on both devices. The iPad2 has a better CPU, GPU and more memory, so you can technically build more complex applications and load more resources into memory. You can compare the exact specs on Wikipedia.


4

One thing to know about OpenGL is that it doesn't have native model loaders. That is, there is no glLoadModel() function or similar. Instead, you must either use an existing loader that converts the coords into something OpenGL can read. It doesn't really matter what you use as a format, but .obj is probably the simplest and most popular to go with. The ...


4

That sounds like a solid path you are taking. You will most likely need to scale down your textures (unless they aren't already high res) and change the hard coded positions. When I am creating an iPad game (with the intention of porting to iPhone) I create two copies of each texture and any hard coded position I create as constants to make them more ...


3

Check out here and here for some related questions ans their corresponding answers. The biggest pain I'm told is setting up the virtual environment for leopard / snow leopard to run and facilitate. Honestly, I'd recommend just getting a Mac mini or the full MBP and devving on that. You'll save yourself a lot of pain and headache setting up the VM ...


3

You can use a jailbreaked iOS device for testing, but you won't be able to sell your App on the Appstore. And you won't be able to test the app on other (non-jailbreaked) devices. To do that you'll need the developer license. The reason why this is so, is that every app needs to be signed (with the certificate you get from Apple when joining the developer ...


3

Use the first one. You certainly don't want your timers be called in random order. Although I'd suggest to actually use none of them, but use the standard update method of cocos2d. This will give you the best available performance and consistent behavior.


3

60fps, if nicely vsynced? If you're looking for (un-vsynced) big numbers like '1000fps', stop thinking in framerates and start thinking in milliseconds-per-frame. The numbers are a lot more meaningful that way around (You won't panic when your first draw call halves your framerate...)


3

There is no API for the keyboard. You have to go through a text input UI element. You could write your own on-screen keyboard but don't forget about Bluetooth keyboard users. Also this isn't game dev specific. See here http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1472258/iphone-keyboard-without-textview


3

Like Amplify91 said, it's not recommended to depend on a fixed framerate, even for an offline game. It's best to keep the game logic and rendering logic separated. The game logic updates the objects positions, statistics, and check for collisions and responds to inputs, and that is independent of the framerate because it's called at regular intervals. The ...


3

Since you're not saying which version of GL you're using, I'm going to assume it's reasonably modern. There's not that much difference, no. Some of the deprecated functions are gone entirely, and some of the newer desktop GL functions are not yet in GL ES, but otherwise they're the same. "Presenting triangles" will only be very different if you're still ...


3

The trick is to only use enough tiles to fill your viewport - that's also how classic consoles (like the NES) simulated huge/wide backgrounds and maps. This is also the reason why these consoles (especially the NES) had sometimes colors overlapping from one side of the screen to the other (as it's essentially continuous memory being wrapped). For example, ...


3

My understanding is that Mobile Safari enables JIT compilation of JavaScript which is a pretty significant performance boost. Due to security reasons, the JIT compilation is not available to a UIWebView within native apps, such as PhoneGap wrapped applications. It seems that homescreen apps also run inside of the non-JIT UIWebView, although I read a few ...


2

There is a third option: have a small number of scheduled updates for tasks that can be independent. Scheduling one update method for each layer could be useful, especially if they are logically separate. One useful example of this is using one scheduled method for the main game logic and another to update the score display.


2

It seems like you: You can pick a format you want to support then write a loader for the model. I found a forum page where someone wrote an .obj loader. http://www.iphonedevsdk.com/forum/iphone-sdk-game-development/4696-working-maya-models-iphone.html


2

According to Apple, iOS devices max out at 60FPS.


2

Try glColorMask(FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE);//This ensures that only alpha will be effected glClearColor(0, 0, 0, alphaValue);//alphaValue - Value to which you need to clear glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT); to clear both the color buffer (with transparent black) and the depth buffer, in case you are using depth testing. glClear must be ...


2

A common method is to record a movie, encode it to a file such as Mpeg-4, and use the iPhone's selection of video controls to play that movie back. The movie itself can be produced in a variety of ways: e.g. Live action; Computer generated images using a CGI package such as Autodesk's 3ds Max or Maya; Play out your scene using your own game and record it ...


2

Why all the talk about jailbreaking? The iOS developers I know use ad-hoc distribution for testing. It's like when you sign your own SSL certificate on a home server. You'll have to add your own signature to the list of allowed signers on your device (butchering the terminology here, sorry), and then you can test to your heart's content. Google turned up ...


2

1 and 3: It's all pretty basic functionality of a modern graphics chip, there is a pixel sampling method which ensures that things look smooth even though an image is rendered in non-native resolution. You just have to make sure that the image is of reasonable size for the big spheres not to become blurry. The common method is to use a 3D api for invoking ...


2

You might check out O'Reilly's iPhone Game Development book if you're talking about more 2D sprite oriented animation (think "Angry Birds"). But if you're talking 3D style animation, you'll need to decide whether you're going to write it yourself (a lot of work) or use a commercial game engine like Unity 3D or Unreal.


2

Yes you can do it, why didn't you even bother to search? This post implies you can, and this one links a page @apple which also implies you can.


2

Ok, i have solved it by a small util function: void SwapBuffers() { EAGLContext* context = [EAGLContext currentContext]; [context presentRenderbuffer:GL_RENDERBUFFER]; }


2

It varies game to game, regarding Game Play. If your game's Game Play is good for both iPhone & iPad, then it is bette to create for both devices. For example, ROVIO's Angry Birds If your game becomes a top seller, then obviously you have to think about "viral" (Because there are many users at iPad). Then you have to make a good R&D whether it ...


2

I suggest you to have a look at this page, that shows license features comparison. You can deploy to iOS,Android or Flash buying the related licenses without buying Unity3D pro license. The pro license has more features than the normal one. Buying it it's more a matter of features than target platforms. I created it using free unity3d editor. Now I ...



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