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9

Did you search in the interactive fiction community? They still write parsers and some try to push the envelope by implementing new techniques such as natural language processing. See for example this link for articles describing approaches used: http://ifwiki.org/index.php/Past_raif_topics:_Development:_part_2#Parsing


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Inform (read this for how-to) TADS (read this blog entry) Quest Choicescript Undum Inform and TADS are the weapons of choice for most experienced IF authors. Quest seems to be catching up in terms of functionality. ChoiceScript is perfect for simple choice-based games, but hard to extend beyond that. Undum (and its popular extension Vorple) is based on ...


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This is a tricky question. It's possible to extract the text parsing functionality from one of a number of IF engines written in general-purpose programming languages (i.e. not something like Inform). Some possibilities might be Pyf, and the Aunt and Butler's engine. If you expand your search to muds you'll have an order of magnitude more choices (here are ...


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In my first-year at university we made an adventure game in Prolog, and for the user input we had to use definite clause grammar or DCG. See http://www.amzi.com/manuals/amzi/pro/ref_dcg.htm#DCGCommandLanguage for an example of using it as a command language. It seemed like a principled (it was uni after all) and flexible approach at the time.


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The term you want is 'natural language processing', or NLP. However, bear in mind that formal methods are designed to try and understand real world texts, whereas you only usually need something that works for a limited subset of your natural language. Typically you can start out with a simple grammar and vocabulary, then write a parser for it. A grammar ...


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You can find a good list of commands in many places in the IF community. You could try downloading Inform 7, TADS 3, ADRIFT, QUEST, and so on and looking at their default commands. There's a less comprehensive list in this guide, http://inform7.com/if/anth/IntroductionToIF.pdf . Your second question is much less clear-cut. Some IF games successfully ...


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You have what I feel are two distinct problems. One is a design problem: how to deal with multiple distinct objects that have no distinct visualizable characteristics. The second problem is a technical problem, which is how to make it easy to identify individual objects out of a group via commands. Technical Solution Back in my MUD programming days, I ...


3

Instead of distinguishing them by different names or colors you could give the player a variety of commands with the power to distinguish. For example, if "five goblins attack you", you could invent either numbered or named commands like - "attack first goblin" or - "attach goblin 1" This approach is almost like you already suggested, but instead of naming ...


1

It looks like most of the territory has been covered for major methodologies, but I thought it might be a good thought exercise to step through how you might want to conceptualize this decision anyways, and stretch myself to cover some methods I haven't seen. Perspective and Quantification methods Several of the solutions involve working around this ...


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The way classic text adventure games of the Infocom style solved this problem was, indeed, by making sure that every distinct object did indeed have a name that allowed it to be uniquely identified. A detail to note is that, in Infocom-style parsers, one could refer to an object by any combination of words in its name. So, if the player came across a red ...


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Would this be useful to your project? I believe what you are asking for is NLP and IF is just a specific use case. http://opennlp.apache.org/ Well, if you wish to check that the correct combination of a noun and a verb was found in the sentence and not so much about structure, grammar and other aspects: I suggest downloading this ...


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One system that I've used, and it comes to my mind recently as someone wrote a game using it for the last Ludum Dare, is Twine. Quite easy to use, and gives a fun view of how your web pages connect! Easy deployment as well, it will make html files and you just put them up on your website!


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I would recommend XML, XML with XSLT support or YAML. 1) XML is good because of two main reasons: it's human readable format, which anyone can understand and use with minimal training and knowledge, and it's very easy to parse, support and extend, you probably already know that. 2) YAML just like XML is again human readable format, but also offers concise ...


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The two best current sources for learning to create a text adventure parser are (as was mentioned) the IF community and the mud community. If you search the major forums for those (Intfiction.org/forum, the newsgroup rec.arts.int-fiction, Mud Connector, Mudbytes, Mudlab, Top Mud Sites) you'll find some answers, but if you're just looking for articles I would ...


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You need to define a domain specific language that is all the sentences which are correct in your game. To this end you have to define a grammar for your language (vocabulary and syntax). The type of grammar you need is a Context Free Grammar and there are tools which automatically generate a parser starting from a synthetic description of the grammar such ...



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