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36

First, read these questions: Where can I find free sounds for my game? How are sound effects made? Game Sound Effects Availability What are good sites that provide free media resources for hobby game development? Where can I find free music for my game? Second, there are so many musicians and sound designers of all skill levels (and expecting various ...


22

There are many sound banks on the Internet providing sound effects or musics for games. It can be free or not, in all formats and quality you want. An example: Findsounds You can mix those samples, or modify them to create new sounds. A fridge sound can be transformed in a spaceship laser sfx. Some softwares are quiet easy to use to do that, such as ...


20

A lot of people say you barely make money in videogame jobs Pretty much all game programmers I know here in the UK earn more than the national median wage. There are no starving employed game programmers. Is there anyone here who develops indie games and can vouch for ANY money making? That's quite a different proposition. Thousands of people want ...


19

I don't think the answer to this question is any different than any other business related field. Will I survive? How am I supposed to know? Have you actually tried making games before? Do you actually like making games? Are you any good at what you do? Do you know the right people to help you get to where you want to be? Do you know the right people ...


16

As made painfully obvious by recent events, 'Europe' is not a unified place in terms of laws or taxation, so giving a definitive answer here would be tricky to say the least. Even EU law is only a guide as each member state implements it differently. Generally speaking, everything is legal until decided otherwise, so it's not so much "how do I earn money ...


16

Don't steal assets or code. For the technologies you are using, make sure you're complying with their terms. Avoid emulating other games. Use an original name and logo. Follow the terms of service on whatever channels you're selling the game through. Incorporate your game company and keep its financial assets separate from your own. Comply with the ...


15

I don't have hard data to back this up, but I firmly believe that offering a copy of the game as a reward is actually a bad plan from a long-term perspective. It can effectively soft-caps your sales, and since it's often the lowest reward level, similarly restrict your capital. The Kickstarter (or what have you) campaign will act as a marketing push for ...


14

It's not terribly popular, in my experience. There's a few problems. First off, Java isn't the most efficient language around (though better than many think), but that lack of efficiency isn't really compensated for by ease of development. Second, running Java is kind of a pain - it's gotten better recently, but it's still tainted by Java's legendary growing ...


14

First of all you obviously need a game that people would want to play. Without that, no matter what you offer you will likely not get much support. So lets assume you have such a game and now you want to attract people. Looking at the most successful game projects on Kickstarter (like Torment: Tides of Numenera or Planetary Annihilation) you will see a ...


13

Don't worry about your concept getting copied wholesale. It's much more work implementing a concept than coming up with one, and anyone who can put together a finished product will either have ideas of their own, or will change the game enough that it becomes different. If your game is awesome, then it'll be really hard to copy it and make a version that's ...


12

Java is the language used for Android games. (I believe there may be some other methods like using C++ but its usually Java). If you have an Android phone, you can test the top-downloaded games to see good examples. I think it's good for indie development - in fact I am doing an indie game for android. There are many tools that Google provides for you - ...


12

You definitely can make money doing indie games. I myself am a co-owner of an indie game startup, and I'm definitely not in danger of starving. :) There are two things to consider. First, indie games are risky, as is any startup. You need funds to get started, there's a high chance of failure for any of a hundred different reasons, and if you try to ...


12

This is mostly an unanswerable question, but I'll go through some of the things you mention. You don't have any useful skills to bring to the table - sorry to be blunt - so you basically have to bankroll the enterprise if you want anybody to take you seriously. Your main cost is the people you need to employ. Unless you know what sort of game you're going ...


11

What you need to do is actually start writing your game! You don't need more resources. It's time to start producing - learn by getting your hands dirty. Write the lightest-weight engine you can. If you follow this tutorial series until #9 (and since it's written for XNA 2 or 3, translate it in a couple of places to XNA 4.0 using this cheat sheet) you'll ...


11

Post it everywhere you can; Steam, Desura... Head over to the Business section of http://tigsource.com forum. Send to this page too to also publish it on cover. Send also to http://indiegames.com/index.html It is a good way to advertise.


11

The completeness of the work depends on the publisher, the game, you and the relationship you have with that publisher. Each publisher will have their own standards for what's complete enough. Further, those standards could be tighter or less restrictive depending on the relationship you have with them. If you've never spoken to them, and they don't know ...


10

Financial planning is outside the scope of this site, and there isn't really enough information to help you with that side of things. That question is something you're going to have to answer yourself. And on top of that, I would say that in order to really answer that question you would have to provide links to your games so we can look at them and see ...


10

I recently quit a triple-A development house out of frustration; but, instead of going indie, I found a smaller developer that does a broader array of projects. So, instead of working on one FPS for three years, they do several facebook/social/casual games a year. While that sounds like "more of the same problem", it's actually turned out in my favor. I ...


10

By no means I am experienced with big game development, but I like the game team roles description as given by Jason Gregory in the Game Engine Architecture, because it is broad enough to hold true most of the time: Engineers (from runtime to tools) Artists (from concept, throught 3D and writing all the way to sound) Designers (gameplay, ...


9

iPhone development is a bit of a minefield for indie development. Unless you can catch a ride on the hype train, your game is unlikely to get anywhere; there is just too much competition. My advice would be; focus on making a few great games rather than a bunch of decent ones, and talk about your games as much as possible. Send emails to TechCrunch, ...


9

I think this post needs to appear. If you have all your game docs organised, what is stopping you making the game? Why bother with a game engine if you already know exactly what you need to do? Build the game, and then when you start writing another you'll be able to pull out the reusable bits. Give it a bit of polish, and you have several decent indie ...


9

Online multiplayer is becoming an increasingly important factor in my decision to purchase games. While that may just be me, it appears that people overall like to play games with other people. Social media games are a good indicator of this, though, I don't really consider those multiplayer for the most part. They do indicate that people like being able to ...


8

Especially if it's your first serious project, getting something (anything) actually completed is going to be your biggest challenge. The more barriers you can remove from that goal, the better. If you're really serious, to give some thought to making your game port-able. If it's a stand-alone Windows application and you're doing your own rendering, don't ...


8

I've sometimes worked with composers and sometimes used free music or created my own ambiences. I usually do my own art, but I'm starting to work with an artist for one of my upcoming projects. I've had very good experiences with the composers; I offer a percentage of the sponsorship amount (I make Flash games), payable on publication. For the most part, ...


8

I think it depends on how much money you have available. A simple 'indie' scenario: Let's say you have a 10k budget for your game, and you plan to work on it for two months. Take out 4k to live on (you'll need to eat, really). That leaves your 6k. You'll want some 'slack' in your budget for unforseen stuff, reserve 1k: 5k remaining. What other things do ...


8

I don't know about UK or Israel, but in Russia being an employed game programmer pays the bills all right. I'd imagine it's not that different in other countries. but if we're talking about indies: there are indie developers making profits. There are some indie developers making HUGE profits. But there never was an indie developer who'd made profits with ...


7

Write your game, and you will have your engine. I'm in the same position as you and your team, I just bought these with the certain thought that they would help us out in our endeavour: 3D Game Engine Design (9780122290633) - This book has everything! Game Coding Complete (9781584506805) Game Engine Architecture (9781568814131) Real-Time Rendering ...


7

As far as I know: as long as you pay for the software (not pirate it by, for example, downloading it via bit torrents) you can use it. However, for example, if in GarageBand you use existing audio loops/samples, you may have to check for clearance with the creator or owner of the rights to the samples.


7

Flash is dying. Whatever some Flashers may tell you, HTML5 is slowly taking its place. Slowly, because HTML5 still isn't really production ready in many senses, for full-fledged and straightforward game dev. You can see solid stats for the shift over the last year if you look (for example) at those jobseeking sites that record these things, Flash demand is ...



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