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18

Language: C was predominant, but C++ was around and used. Dev tools: Development environments included those from Borland and Watcom (almost unheard of today) among others. Both Borland and Watcom had their own compilers and their own IDEs. Borland was by far the most popular in general, though Watcom had a reputation for producing faster compiled ...


10

Java is the default language to develop on Android, although you can use NDK (native C) for performance issues on specific parts. But basically, Java + OpenGL is fast enough for most 2D games. One of the best (in my opinion) development environments for Java/Android is Eclipse : you can download plugins for Android from the official website. You have ...


7

You may have a problem with your eclipse setup and perhaps being more specific on the error would help. For instance, there is a known bug with Eclipse Helios autocomplete being very slow with the Android SDK. Do you have the latest dev tools and eclipse plugin? To answer the question, Netbrains' IntelliJ IDEA has android support and there is a plugin for ...


6

The Android developer site doesn't make it clear anymore that the SDK uses the Java language, but that's the official language. Compiled languages can be used through the Native Development Kit, allowing for languages like C or C++ to be used; however, this is for augmenting Java code rather than replacing it. The supported IDE is Eclipse, and Google ...


5

You are mistaken. Software development tools licensed under the GNU GPL can be used to create software under other licenses, even proprietary ones. The official FAQ about the GNU GPL reads: Question: Can I use GPL-covered editors to develop non-free programs? Can I use GPL-covered tools to compile them? Answer: Yes, because the copyright on the ...


5

Strictly speaking, there's at least one IDE than allows changing code while debugging: it's Visual Studio (the Edit and Continue feature Tetrad mentions in comment). Looks like GDB (GCC's debugger) has a similar feature as well. However I've never seen this feature used in a real game project. The reason for this is probably that the changes allowed by Edit ...


5

Depends what you mean by "require Visual Studio". Your choice of IDE isn't really related to the language used or size of the project, in my opinion, just so long as you're using an editor you feel comfortable with. If you are looking for editors other than the default Scite that comes with Unity... If you feel like changing from Javascript to C# or Boo, I ...


4

A lot of big development companies will have their own engines, others will pay for licenses to use some of the big-name engines like: Unreal: http://www.unrealengine.com/ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Unreal_Engine_games) Source: http://source.valvesoftware.com/index.php CryEngine: http://www.crytek.com/cryengine ...


4

I did a lot of programming on the Apple (not professionally, but it's what I learned on) and Applesoft BASIC and assembler where about where it was at for hobbyists. Other languages were available -- Logo was common, Pascal was written about everywhere but I know no one who used it, I wasn't really aware of C being used on any Apple platform until Orca C ...


4

As a completion to Sean's post, since you mentioned Doom: there is a nice blog by Fabien Sanglard, who made a review on the part of code used for making Doom (the one from 1993). The review is here: http://fabiensanglard.net/doomIphone/doomClassicRenderer.php PS: The blog has a lot of Doom/Quake-related code reviews, and it's a nice read for a game ...


3

Easiest solution without recompiling ALL of the code, aside from VS's awesome edit/continue, is to keep the part your working on in a separate library,(DLL, etc depending on your platform), and just rebuild that part. Include a command in your primary/host app to unload and reload the library in question. You'll still have to recompile the lib, but not the ...


3

Visual Studio has no support for Java. There are some hacks to using VS as an over-sized text editor but this won't give you any debugging capabilities and you will have to write your own build scripts. I have found no LWJGL ports to C# so I think the answer on your question is No. However there are OpenGL wrappers for C#, see this SO question. And if you ...


3

What languages were used? 6502 for most, rarely C (Aztek), lots of BASIC, some Pascal (Apple Pascal). What was 6502 assembler development like? There were some pretty neat assemblers and tools for 6502: Orca/M, Merlin, plus in the later days it was possible to develop on a PC and serial link to the Apple to remote debug. Let's not forget the Beagle Bros. ...


3

You can build XNA projects outside of the IDE (debugging them effectively is another matter entirely), just like any other C# project. Using the MSBuild system. The specific thing that you need to know about for XNA is the Content Pipeline that you need to process your content. You can build content projects outside of the IDE, but to set them up you would ...


3

One can use the Visual Studio IDE for PS3 development -- the PS3 relevant bits are, of course, just command-line tools (GCC ports) that can be plugged in to makefiles that VS can understand, after all. There's also a toolchain called ProDG, by SN Systems that is used for PS3 development. GDB, as an aside, is its own, command-line program. Some IDEs (such ...


3

Don't let the lack of memory management scare you off. A rudimentary smart pointer class is surprisingly easy to create on your own, and there are lots of other easy ways to simplify managing your memory: Use static objects for things that you need one or a fixed number of. Use object pools for objects you need to create and destroy dynamically and whose ...


3

GBA and DS dev is not open to individuals, neither the software or the hardware used in development can be acquired unless you are an employee of an established game development company. That being said, there was a fairly good homebrew GBA dev community back in the day, and I think it has carried on into the DS somewhat. Check out http://gbadev.org, they ...


2

No, there is not a drag-and-drop way to program, unless you're using a language specifically designed for drag-and-drop (which are not in any way easier than written programming, and can be nightmares). No, you shouldn't be looking into making an Android game when you're an absolute newbie to programming in general and Java. Making a game isn't easy, so ...


1

Ch (formerly Cint) allows you to do this. You could also probably hook something up with Clang and the LLVM JIT, which I believe is what Ch is doing. Technically you must always recompile, but it's definitely possible for that compilation to be automatic and for the changes to be made to a running program in some limited circumstances. It'll never be ...


1

Eclipse shouldn't be that slow, you may have some thing wrong. Anyways to answer you question there is IntelliJ IDEA. I use it for web development and find that it is better at project management than Eclipse one you get used to it. JetBrains has things such as auto complete down to a science compared to either Eclipse or Visual Studio.


1

As far as engines are concerned, check out the Corona SDK . It's really easy to use (Lua) and there are a lot of great resources and tutorials available. It isn't free, though; there is a yearly subscription, but it's well worth the price.


1

Your legal options? None short of getting a Nintendo dev license. And I doubt that's going to happen. Unit testing, managed code? I seriously doubt that. AFAICS, you need to code it in assembly, or native C/C++. I feel some C++ unit testing framework will probably work though..maybe not for the DS specific bits. For actual development, the one that came up ...



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