New answers tagged

3

So upon further inspection your problem actually has nothing to do with coordinate system conversions. This could have been made more clear by not naming your axial coordinates X and Y but rather Q and R. The problem you're actually having is bad loop conditions. The original code sample produces delta q's and r's which you try to convert, in your for loops, ...


6

As Vector57 noted, the problem is you are using the wrong coordinate system. The algorithm described is meant to be used with cube coordinates, which have x, y and z components: This may not be obvious from the algorithm's pseudocode, but that's because it's a simplification of this: var results = [] for each -N ≤ dx ≤ N: for each -N ≤ dy ≤ N: ...


0

For anyone looking at this by googling "cocos2d isometric transformation rotate skew" or something like that like I was: I figured out the right skews and rotations. A two-layer approach was needed due to the lack of a diagonal scale or Z rotation. For javascript devs: this makes an isometrically transformed DrawNode. I'm not sure what performance impact ...


3

Quite honestly, I think you actually are over-thinking this. It's good to have a well thought-out design, but it's important not to get too hung up on the small details at an early stage. That being said, I think there is a fourth option here that might help you a bit: As opposed to filling in all hexagons that can be moved to, you can draw an outline ...


2

Amit Patel wrote a great entry all about hexagonal coordinate systems at http://www.redblobgames.com/grids/hexagons/ and I strongly encourage you to read through the whole thing for a deeper understanding. A system he mentions in there that happens to be my personal choice for such systems is the Cube Coordinate system; In this system, three numbers are ...



Top 50 recent answers are included