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2

Actually the author of Ink wrote a blog post explaining just that ! He is using Game Maker "surfaces" which are I think the equivalent of Framebufer Objects with color texture attachments in OpenGL.


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Rotations occur relative to the origin, so you want the camera to be 100 units away already before you rotate it if you want the camera to stay focused on the origin. This image will hopefully make it clear (source page): The view matrix you would use is then (I apply the transformations from right-to-left): view = inverse( rotate(90) * translate(100) * ...


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First of all Do not use that deprecated library ( unless you know why you r using it eg. For assignments) You want fast graphics but the problem here is the old drivers used on a modern machine. For the fast rendering you should prefer either directx(only on windows) or opengl(available on multiple platforms). If you choose to use opengl then go to ...


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You could try putpixel (void putpixel(int x, int y, int color)) Although I'm not really sure that's going to be fast enough. You're using <graphics.h> which is a very old library designed for when many computers were running DOS and had resolutions like 320x200 - a quarter of your target. On Windows it would be using GDI under the hood, not exactly ...


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I have faced this problem earlier.This is because the "Generate Mip Maps" option is on. You need to deselect that option and apply the changes to the sprites. Mip Maps are pre-calculated, optimized sequences of textures, each of which is a progressively lower resolution representation of the same image. They are intended to increase rendering speed and ...


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When using Unity 5 and the Standard shader you need to use "_EmissionColor" rather than "_Emission" to set the Emission value.


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I think you don't have to make it full screen on all devices. Nowadays most of the modern devices uses 1920x1080 ratio. So making game run on that ratio will make it run full screen more than half of the devices. And in other devices you can scale your image until one of dimensions match and center it on screen. This way there will be empty places around ...


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I fixed it with: glOrtho(0, width, height, 0, 0, 1);


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You have a very specific audience? That's great, because it means that your advertisement is easy to target. Go to where your target demographic is. Find out what communication channels they use, and pitch your game there. But tread lightly: Communities are allergic to people who are obviously only there to promote a product, so make sure your ...


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Some ideas: You could ignore the issue, and do what you're currently doing. Assuming those texture and shader comparisons are to OpenGL IDs (which are just integers), it's unlikely those checks are going to create a huge performance bottleneck. Comparison of integer values on modern CPUs is rather fast. Unless your profiler has told you this is currently a ...


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You could use a large texture for procedurally generating those decals on the GPU. You could draw them in a way where they take the angle, density, viscosity, velocity (whatever you want) into account when drawing them. A 1024×1024 surface would give you 256 different 64x64 decals at any given time. You choose to use 2 blocks for longer "smears" if that's ...


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From the video, it seems that the resolution isn't terribly high. If this isn't a problem, you could always use a single pixel buffer that you blit to the screen every frame, otherwise known as "software rendering". Then you can have effects as fancy as you can code. Before the 3D-accelerated days, old-school games got away with this because most screen ...


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Use trig to sample it into a triangle strip. As for texturing: a rectangular image UV-mapped to the triangle strip might work, with projective interpolation.


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No, it is not possible, unless you read the involved pixels into a pixel shader, and then do the interpolation in the shader program manually.



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