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8

Pixel art generally responds extremely bad to any scaling. Just a small size adjustment will make pixel art appear either blurry or distorted, depending on what scaling algorithm your engine uses. For that reason it is important to make sure that the graphics are designed in exactly the resolution in which they appear in the finished game. Here is a ...


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Make them the size they would normally be. Don't try to make them big and scale them down later. That way there will be less time loading the images (Not that it's all that long.) Less data stored as well. Make sure that when you are scaling them up to draw them to the screen, you don't use a any sort of filter. Anotherwords... Use no mipmapping. Ie point ...


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If you can only afford to have one set of sprites drawn (i.e. your artist time/effort is limited) then get them to do the largest resolution. It's far easier to make hi-res sprites look okay when scaled down than it is to make low-res sprites look okay when scaling up. Neither approach is better than having sets of sprites tailored for your target ...


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Vector images are useful since they would work with any resolution, and you can even use them directly in the game, letting OpenGL/DirectX rasterize it only when they are rendered to the frame buffer. But since you specifically mentioned pixel art it doesn't sound like you would get the right look with vector graphics, in that case you want to be careful ...


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Calculating the vector that points from a spring at point A = (x0, y0) to a spring at point B = (x1, y1) is simply: v = (x1 - x0, y1 - y0) Assuming no other forces acting on the player, then changing the player's velocity to some scalar multiple of v when they hit spring A would direct them to spring B. If another force like gravity is involved, then, ...


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The Mario64 effect is done by moving vertices. You need a grid for fluid quantity (a water level height value) represented by the black dots height. And a grid of direction & speed of transfer between the former grid's cells which simulates water's inertia (the red arrows). Every simulation tick each height cell tries to return to 0 by pushing out or ...



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