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62

"People" have been declaring the death of 2D games ever since 3D games came into being. Hell, Sony even tried to outlaw 2D games of any kind on the PS1. And what's one of the most well-remembered PS1 games? Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. A 2D game. 2D games aren't dead; they will never be dead. Even if you wiped every 2D side-scroller off the face of ...


48

Copy protection is useless. Whatever you do, it will be cracked because your product will be in the hands of the bad guys. The only people you will be inconveniencing are the people who purchased your product (look at what happened to Spore). Besides, pirates are usually the people that buy the most. The best you can do is make your product reasonably ...


44

Make the distribution of your game as simple as possible and release frequent updates (with free new content) eg. Angry Birds on the iPhone. Even if somebody pirates the game first, he might decide to buy it just because of the auto update function. (+ the new free content will give a feeling of getting much more for the money and that you are a decent ...


42

Yes it is, check this list for a proof. Those are some games made with Java using The Lightweight Java Game Library (LWJGL). It is a low-level framework, which provides OpenGL for high quality graphics and OpenAL for sounds. It also provides input API. With these you can quite easily get started to serious game development in Java. I am currently writing my ...


35

Not really. Here's the thing- firstly, there's very little in terms of existing libraries for Java compared to the virtually everything that is for C++. Secondly, Java as a language simply doesn't lend itself well to game development- I mean, for example, if you're dealing with GPU buffers then Java does not provide a language feature which will aid you in ...


31

Branching depends a little on VCS support for the feature (ie: whether the VCS makes it easy or difficult). But at a minimum, you want a branch for each independently supported release of your project. That is, if you have "Game 2", and "Game 2 + Expansion" which are separate products built from the same codebase, and which you need to be able to patch and ...


27

Yes, C++ is the language used most often (though some people do still use C). There are numerous reasons for this. Sheer momentum is one - it's simply the language that has been used for years, a lot of tech already exists and people are comfortable with it, so changing is not going to happen overnight. Then there is the issue of control. Game developers ...


26

You're in 11th grade. I'd advocate finishing high school and attending a college or university with a decent program related to the specialization you'd like to have in the games industry -- that means computer science if you want to be a programmer, for example. I don't see a lot of advantages to being "homeschooled" for your last year-and-change of high ...


24

Other than the high level discussion points that Joe brought up, there are a few other things you should be aware of. You'll typically be using some kind of bug tracking or task tracking tool that your lead will be using to assign you tasks. Sometimes they're the same (i.e. FogBugz). Sometimes your bug list will be through a publisher and your task list ...


24

It really doesn't matter. The core concepts are the same in both, especially now that pixel shaders are the norm. And since most games are multiplatform they're probably going to use a subset of features that are similar in both languages. As long as you can write shaders in glsl or hlsl, you'll be fine. That being said, the number of "game engine ...


23

I am not a lawyer and this is not considered legal advice. Yes it would be illegal. You have to contact the owner of the song, and work out licensing details. It is likely to be very expensive.


23

The main models I can think of are: Charge per copy - the traditional "software licensing" model, you charge your customers a retail price to "buy" a copy of the software and the subsequent right to install or play it. This is still a dominant model for software of all kinds including PC, console and mobile device games, even after the introduction of ...


22

So, I am really serious about game development, is Java still a viable choice? I have tried multiple times to learn C++, but I don't really like the language. I don't really know why, but usually, whenever I try to learn, I can never grasp the topics. If your reason for choosing Java is that you couldn't understand C++, your Java programs aren't going ...


21

Welcome to the game industry :) So you're doing a massive refactoring. Massive refactoring is Evil, but that's not the topic. You were probably given this task to test your nerves anyway, so don't give up on it. My answer is: you have to break it down into little chunks. It'll be your daily routine in a few months, so you have to learn how to divide and ...


21

I want to focus on your third question, because it's within my area of knowledge (indie developer): I haven't written a line of C++ code for many, many years. And, in fact, I have forgotten many of the nitty-gritty details (and in C++ there are a lot of those). I do most of my work in C#. And you absolutely don't have to learn C++. However, the skills I ...


20

When companies talk about hiring a gameplay programmer, what they are talking about is a programmer who will be responsible for code that directly touches on the game experience. That is, the programmer will be responsible for actually constructing the games, rather than engine or larger game systems. But beyond that, things vary a lot: Some companies ...


17

I personally think it's better not to specialize in game development for your studies. At least over here in Europe, a "normal" computer science degree gets you as far as any game development-related degree - if not further. Programming is programming, if it's for games or not. By all means, take the game-related classes at your university and (this is the ...


17

Programmers are far from the only people in the game industry. From what you've stated, it sounds like you'd be much, much happier pursuing a game design career. You could still write down those plots, stories, characters, and fictional gaming worlds with a team of other game designers (depending on how big the game company is). Then just hand all the ...


17

If you want to self-publish and sell your first game successfully, you will have little other choice than to create lots of attention, and a gameplay video seems unavoidable to do that. As for fears of plagiarism, having the largest possible upfront attention should actually be positive for you. Ideas are cheap and plentiful, it's the execution that matters ...


16

As someone trying to get into the programming side you've got two main options. Internships Look for any internships you can find with game companies in your area. These are a great way to get your foot in the door. Many larger publishers use internships as a try-before-you-buy plan with students. If you can prove yourself in a real production situation ...


16

Your game will be cracked, and it will be pirated. Having said that... Keeping the pirates at bay is an old article about an old game for an old system, but it still makes for interesting reading, and may give you some ideas to keep a game 'uncracked' for a little while. This article also covers the basics of obfuscating function calls in c/c++.


16

Don't steal assets or code. For the technologies you are using, make sure you're complying with their terms. Avoid emulating other games. Use an original name and logo. Follow the terms of service on whatever channels you're selling the game through. Incorporate your game company and keep its financial assets separate from your own. Comply with the ...


15

Dungeon Siege by Gas Powered Games Scott Bilas released a lot of information about Dungeon Siege which featured component-based systems, amongst other things. Dungeon Siege was released in 2002.


15

Resistance 1-2 (possibly 3) (2006-2008) by Insomniac Games Terrance Cohen lists these games in his A Dynamic Component Architecture for High Performance Gameplay talk from GDC Canada 2010. Not sure if this was applied to the recent Ratchet & Clank games.



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