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1

I agree with your sentiment that the "punishment" in games are sometimes a bit harsh, especially when having to restart a game in order to fix one or two simple mistakes. Even in games that aim for realism, they are still a form of entertainment and as such I think they should avoid frustration as much as possible. To that end, some ways to solve your ...


2

This is simply a design decision that you, as the developer, will need to make on your own terms. There isn't a correct answer to the question. Some paths you could consider: Poll the users on an established game's forums and determine what their communities prefer. Implement different difficulty levels in your game: Easy lets you rotate, Hard does not. ...


-1

Metroid has its share of going right-to-left: Not only is the first and easiest-to-get item left of the start, but reaching the final boss is a right-to-left journey, all the way to the escape! The retold story Zero Mission "corrects" this by adding more to the story with one more final boss, the second escape being left-to-right. Metroid II (Return of ...


0

You don't need a specific language for this, it's just a graphics concern, make 3D models with low number of polygons in any 3D modeling software and make the rest like any other game in any language you like. In the Playstation the games where probably made with C and some assembly code. I don't know exactly what programs where used for this game, but even ...


0

No need to take an extra class for Input just write the following code in render method :- if (Gdx.input.isTouched()) { Rectangle touchRectangle = new Rectangle(Gdx.input.getX( ), Gdx.graphics.getHeight() - Gdx.input.getY( ), 10, 10); //just check if your finger overlaps on your ...


2

I dont think the question should be "How to force players" but rather, "how to make very appealing to players" to kill low level monsters. The more natural and logical way it is, the better. You could take example of the pokemon series (I personally think, its one of the best RPGs ever made). You couldnt die. You would be just moved to nearest center (that ...


2

I think you should use something more natural.. give the players goals (quests) they need to accomplish in order to proceed. The goals will implicitly require the players to kill monsters in order to progress to higher level areas. So yes organically restrict higher level zones by making the player progress to them by completing quests. Another option I ...


1

Here's what I normally do with my states. It might not be the best way, or even the second best (but remember, the thing that matters is not the architecture of your game code, but the actual end result.). I start with a basic State-class (all code in Pseudo-C++): class State { virtual void Event(Event e); virtual void Update(float deltaTime); ...


-4

A spinning animation can be done in several ways. An easy way is to create 2D sprites at the bottom of the machine and move them upwards until they hit the top then you move the sprite of the machine over the sprite of the symbol. If the symbol's bottom hit the bottom of that part of the machine then you make it disappear. An alternative if you want 3D is to ...


0

There are multiple ways to deal with this: 1 reseting the game, if you have a browser strategy game then the players that have been playing sinds the start will always have a resource advantage, resetting the game every few months will allow new players to join in. 2 If you have some sort of travel time rules you can place players that have a similar join ...


1

The only potential harm is to your power consumption, so don't do this on mobile devices. Conversely, quite a few embedded systems spend their entire lives in a loop waiting for things to happen. It used to be entirely normal to simply render game frames as fast as possible, sometimes without even a timer to compensate gameplay for different CPU speeds. ...


0

Puzzle Pirates does this in a very direct, but effective way. In Puzzle Pirate, ships are ranked based on the rank of individual pirates manning the ship, and ships full of players weaker than you would appear with a blue might rings, while ships stronger than you would appear with red might rings. If you attack too many blue ringed ships, then you'll be ...


0

I personally prefer your second idea of using composition, but if you wanted to stay with the style of using generics as you do currently, but not having to initialize multiple pools maybe you could allow one object pool to spawn different enemies/objects,a small snippet just to give you an idea of what I mean: ObjectPool myObjectPool = new ObjectPool(); ...


1

Let's look at two examples of games that IMO do quite well to deter this behavior: Clash of Clans: In Clash of Clans, new players are given a small amount of starting gold and elixir and a 3-day shield. This shield prevents other players from attacking the new player, but is removed if the new player attacks other players. This gives the new player 3 days ...


1

You shouldn't have jittery movement / gameplay There are two ways that you can implement game logic - tied to a real time, or tied to the number of "turns"/processing steps. If some thingy in your game is moving leftwards, will it's motion be different if your stepLogic() was called 100 instead of 50 times? If your code treats the elapsed time explicitly ...


7

Reduce progression in your game mechanics. Avoid making players stronger in a game-mechanical sense based on how far they progressed in the game. That way an experienced player has no unfair advantage over an inexperienced player except for their game knowledge, which a new player can also acquire when they do their research. Herd your players. When a ...


1

Different browser games I've played used different strategies for this. All came down to resetting all players on a set time. One game dropped all new players in a new world with 400 at the same time, let them all compete against each-other until only one or a handful of alliances where remaining. A single round took about 1 month, and after that everybody ...


30

It will cause one CPU core to always run on 100%. This usually doesn't cause any harm to the system. CPUs are designed to run on 100% for hours. But on a mobile device it will drain the battery quickly and heat up the device, which will likely cost you about a stars in your store ratings. On a desktop computer this is less of a problem, but it will consume ...


2

The main problem you want to solve is strong, powerful players pick on weak, new players after their protection ends. There are quite a few social solutions to this: Punish players for attacking those weaker than them: The spoils of defeating another player should be decreasingly lower the more weak your opponent is (and they can be multiplied the ...


17

The only similar system I know is OGame. In OGame, players are protected from other players until the have a certain amount of points (I think it is 50.000). It makes more sense to protect players based on their score instead of time, as score gives you a better aproximation on how powerful players are. The theory is that with that many points, players are ...



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