New answers tagged

0

There are some pretty good suggestions in the other answers here. I would like to add one that is more libgdx specific (so you hopefully don't have to reinvent the wheel). BitmapFonts in libgdx are raster(bitmap) images and will pixelate just like any other raster image when scaled. The solution that I usually use is that if I want a font in different ...


1

The simplest way to do it would be to lay out your weapon combinations in whatever order you see fit in a circular list. Each combination could have a bonus against the 22 combinations after it in the list, and a weakness against the 22 before it. The player might appreciate a more straight-forward or easier-to-recognise logic to that order -- some sort of ...


-3

I'm going to give you a rather stupid answer but what the heck. First of all hundreds of objects in a game is no problem. Secondly there is this guy called quil 18 that has great tutorials. Start with the Basics of 2d tile maps and then you can watch this gigantic series about a base building game here


0

You will have to use signed distance field font rendering. The generated font's pixels represents the distance from the edge rather than the opacity. Where 0.5 (0x7F) is the edge of the font, 0.0 (0x00) is the outside, 1.0 (0xFF) is the inside. How wide this extends is up to you, in the grey scale example image I'm using a 2-pixel distance so it reaches ...


0

Have the character react with a slight (random but increasing, within limits, short but noticeable) delay. Have the character occasionally turn it's back to the object he should process. Have jump on one leg instead of walking. Occasionally measure wind direction with wet finger? After T of inactivity, let feet innaturally, slowly sink 10 cm into the ...


0

I have never tried this before. But maybe you could have your characters head and the camera turn off to the side every now and then. Like when you are handing in a quest or something have the sound go fuzzy and the camera turn off requiring the player to shake the camera a bit to get the character back on task.


0

You could avoid the blur effect when upscaling by using a high-resolution image font and drawing it downscaled. Example: if your font is supposed to be drawn with a 24px size, use a sample at 48px and draw the text with a scale ratio of 0.5, because downscaling won't make aliasing noticeable. This does work fine as long as your font image strip doesn't take ...


0

I suppose a lot depends on how you want that boredom to affect the player character. Are they just zoning out at a basic work task, like folding laundry or assembling packets? Maybe the gameplay becomes simpler and simpler, starting with multiple inputs to do the first few iterations, then maybe just one click or press per iteration, to maybe even just hold ...


1

In some games, mainly in fps, it can create a bit more of a thrill. Ex. if you are behind cover and out of ammo and you see a gun. Maybe you can reach it or you have to sprint across the open to grab it. Making it manual adds a little more skill and requires a bit more attention to be played by the player. Another reason is that a lot of games (like ...


1

I totally agree with @Blue and @Dar Brett about not messing with the player view. Aside from their excellent suggestions, let me add one thing. Maybe you could preserve the full immersion better if you allow the player to turn her body by using inverse kinematics? Consider that the player model is connected to the hand of the girl and if the player turns ...


10

Why are you giving the player loot in the first place? It's a reward stimulus for the player. Games need a constant stream of reward stimulus (or at least the anticipation of a reward) to keep the player motivated to continue playing. The impact of a reward is not just determined by the mechanical effect (player now has 10 more gold to spend) but also by ...


5

When someone leads you by your hand, your body can't rotate but your head can. Separate the two interactions of rotating body and rotating head when it comes to the girl grabbing their hand. Make it a prompt for the player to look at the girl directly with both his body and head facing forward before this interaction can start. Once they do this, lock ...


4

I think it's best not to force the players viewpoint to do anything. You'd make users disoriented at best and make them sick at worst. Maybe trying to build some kind of cue similar to what FPS games do when you're taking damage from the side with a red flash on that side of the screen. I think that you could quite easily play on people's natural ...


0

There was an old video game about vikings. If they were not being instructed to perform tasks, they would pick their nose, scratch their asses, and fight with each other. Hysterical. Remembered to this day.


1

Good tutorials are tricky. Cutscenes can be nice, but try to avoid too much infodumping. A long-standing rule of storytelling is "show, don't tell". It is usually better to tell the player almost nothing about the world beforehand and introduce the background as they play. Take, for example, the first hour of Half Life 2. There is a short intro cutscene, ...


1

As Alexandre commented, the best way to go about this is lots of work and testing. There is no simple solution or algorithm that can give you this answer. The tiniest change to any skill, stat, or other variable will directly affect the gameplay. Your best bet is to just give it whatever values you think will lead to the gameplay you want and tweak them as ...


0

If we consider a 'classic' top-down view minimap, we can consider that the minimap is at the plane of z = 0. To help show the 3d dimension, you could add an additional plane at x = 0 and another at y = 0, and project a line between the object and the 3 planes. Of course, you'll have to modify the angle of view of the 3d map with regard to the current ...


1

In addition to the excellent and compact answer by Giorgio Liggio: is it standard practice to send positions as the synchronized state between a client and server instead of a velocity vector? You send both and use both, they complete each other in a fault-tolerant and stretchful way. In addition, you would send events, like "client just turned his ...


0

Not sure if it would be something you want to consider, but something I've seen work well with classic works (the specific ones I had in mind used fairy tales instead of Shakespeare) is to have the player be a third party participant that is effected by the play.For instance, in World of Warcraft they played out a raid boss as Little Red Riding Hood and the ...


2

Making good multiplayer games isn't a trivial thing, we know. There are many aspects to care about: network architecture, machines synchronization, network delays, cheating... But, let's start one step per time. In turn-based games, as you said, you are limited to send objects positions, because that is the only important information you'll need. In ...


0

In your call circle.setBounds(200, 200, circle.getWidth(), circle.getHeight()); The getWidth() and getHeight() calls are methods on Actor, not Image. You have not set the Actor's width and height, so you are setting its bounds to a rectangle with a height and width of 0... no clickable area. Change the call to circle.setBounds(200, 200, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included