Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

It certainly depends on the type of game, and as always, there are no foolproof ways to increase difficulty, but in my experience, I have found that making difficult games/levels is much, much more difficult than making easy games/levels. Some reasons that come to mind are: It is very easy to cross the line between difficult and plain impossible. I really ...


16

Some suggestions to bring more cards into the game: When a player wins a match, reward them with two cards: One from the losers deck and one newly created one. You might also consider giving a generated card to the loser to compensate for the loss, otherwise they would progress backwards, which is a real motivation breaker. Reward players for playing by ...


10

Your assumption that question difficulty is subjective and is itself a hard question is absolutely correct! From a professional assessment standpoint it's a known issue, and while there are techniques to assist, it is best considered "an ongoing process" that requires testing and adjustment - like trying to figure out what just the right amount of salt to ...


4

The "difficulty" of a question is certainly hard to classify. There is a large amount of subjectivity to the issue -- for example, a question about mathematics will likely seem harder to a person with no mathematics background in their education. You can't classify the "difficultly" of questions in general with an algorithm; you'll have to do it yourself. ...


4

Both of those pieces of code appear to pick a random location (xx,yy in the first example and x,y in the second), then try to change grass to something else near that location. There are lots of other algorithms, although most are more complicated than the ones you posted. I can't answer whether they're over your head; I don't know what's in your head ;-) ...


4

The very first thing you need to determine is what is your target audience. Your target audience will help you determine the range of what is considered common versus uncommon type questions. The broader the audience, the more generalized common becomes because the questions will have to span larger age groups of where educational boundaries vary ...


4

If it's loaded from an image then you probably don't need flood fill, if you can access the palette table of the image to change colors and carry the change into the new representation of the image. If you are drawing the image programmatically then you probably do need flood fill and it's often trivial to do. If you could use vector images like SVG images ...


3

Platformer difficulty is about perfect timing of player actions. I would use 3 main approaches: Playtesting Let you level be played by players and adjust the difficulty appropriately. Simulating That will work for simple levels and parts of levels. Make a simulation with all the moves required to pass the level part and see how much they are allowed to ...


3

Are you randomly creating waves, or would they be set. If the enemy waves were set, I would suggest figuring out what enemies are worth what points, and if there is a diffuculty, figure out what the modifier in points would be. Once you have your set waves with enemies of set points, total up the points, and make each star be an even portion of the total. ...


2

Hexagons as a grid type are not uncommon in games, particularly games involving tactical elements. In a 4-way movement scheme, in order to move diagonally you have to expend two moves. In a 8-way movement scheme, you either have to make the diagonal moves have a cost of two, one, or a fractional sqrt(2) cost in resources. Hexagonal grids allow movement ...


1

I would think you could get an assessment of a player's skill by tracking a few things, and various skill levels could be defined based on these items. As stated already, overall score could be one of them. I think examining how well a player does on a per ball level, will also give you a good gauge to go by. For instance, how long a single ball is in ...


1

When you say you're going to measure skill by points, it's circular reasoning / logic. How are you going to decide how many points the player deserves for each goal accomplished? You can't rate the player's skill by points cause in order to do that, you require the base assumption that the sum of points accurately reflects the challenge surpassed, which may ...


1

You would want to evaluate the player's skill using a set of recent data( three play-throughs) or something like that. As a user continues to play, their skill increases along with their familiarity of the game mechanics. Having a point threshold seems to be the best way to control a users skill. Naturally a person will have a couple good runs here and ...


1

This may not be exactly on-topic, but I want to add my two cents about the global experience on high difficulty : Please give a focus on player frustration. When I'm confronting a very difficult level that requires lot of deaths/replays, any tiny thing can make the player rage, especially if he can't focus on the difficult passage. More precisely: how far ...


1

Rule 1: Do not use random behavior in traps and enemies. This is why Roguelikes could be problematic if they are not fine tuned as randomness could create massive difficulty spikes if not handled correctly. The point is only making the game hard to beat; this may sound obvious but you also need to convey to the player what challenge they are facing and why ...


1

Questions I agree with the others that this since this is a trivia game, the "heart" of your game is the questions, and this is where a considerable amount of time should be spent. I would recommend starting with a list of metrics on which to "Grade" each question: Topic Sub Topic Geographic Uniqueness Percent Correct Female Percent Correct Male Percent ...


1

Is your game online? Then you could use a crowdsourcing approach. Just check how many players answer a question correctly and rate the questions accordingly. This can be made completely automatic. A simple solution would be to have every question start with a score of 0. When a player answers it correctly, you subtract 1 from the score. When a player ...


1

Actually there's a simple formula for it but its based on how many people on average would get the right answer in a population. difficulty = correct - wrong where correct is the number of people that got it right and wrong is the number of poeple that didn't when asked to a large group of people. The real question is ... how do you figure out how many ...


1

I like shroeder answer. It's very logical. There could be a lot more to the scoring system as well. When should you score? I would score when you kill a enemy from the wave. You could even fill the stars as they reach the score needed to fill X% of the star. It would be a good way for them to see before all of the bonuses are added at the end (if ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible