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30

It will cause one CPU core to always run on 100%. This usually doesn't cause any harm to the system. CPUs are designed to run on 100% for hours. But on a mobile device it will drain the battery quickly and heat up the device, which will likely cost you about a stars in your store ratings. On a desktop computer this is less of a problem, but it will consume ...


17

The only similar system I know is OGame. In OGame, players are protected from other players until the have a certain amount of points (I think it is 50.000). It makes more sense to protect players based on their score instead of time, as score gives you a better aproximation on how powerful players are. The theory is that with that many points, players are ...


7

Reduce progression in your game mechanics. Avoid making players stronger in a game-mechanical sense based on how far they progressed in the game. That way an experienced player has no unfair advantage over an inexperienced player except for their game knowledge, which a new player can also acquire when they do their research. Herd your players. When a ...


3

Using your own analogy: Why did people make COBOL? Why did people make C++ if C was around? Why did they make PHP? Why did they make Python? Ignoring the fact that some of those implementations are written in C themselves, this is the same thing. Some people want to make their own languages for new purposes and to do that you need to start with the ...


2

I am not aware of any social studies about this. But good rule for happy player is do not force them to do what they dont want to. As for tutorial type help, many games have a checkbox "stop showing tutorial tips" or something similar on the popup window, and option in game menu to re-enable it later. In Trine there was also an option to show puzzle hints ...


2

Strict has the advantage of being easy to understand, every player can easy calculate how much damage his attack will do. Be warned through that this creates a situation in where the higher someone's defense the more they gain from a higher defense level (if you have 0 defense the other attack with 100 and you have 1000 hit points it takes 10 hits to take ...


2

The main problem you want to solve is strong, powerful players pick on weak, new players after their protection ends. There are quite a few social solutions to this: Punish players for attacking those weaker than them: The spoils of defeating another player should be decreasingly lower the more weak your opponent is (and they can be multiplied the ...


2

I dont think the question should be "How to force players" but rather, "how to make very appealing to players" to kill low level monsters. The more natural and logical way it is, the better. You could take example of the pokemon series (I personally think, its one of the best RPGs ever made). You couldnt die. You would be just moved to nearest center (that ...


2

I think you should use something more natural.. give the players goals (quests) they need to accomplish in order to proceed. The goals will implicitly require the players to kill monsters in order to progress to higher level areas. So yes organically restrict higher level zones by making the player progress to them by completing quests. Another option I ...


2

The solution can be pretty simple - just add a field or flag and dont release until n bullets of your burst have been fired. in weapon: int burst = 0; when hadling event: void onFireButtonPress() { //previously simple fire(); burst = burst > 0 ? BULLETS_PER_BURST : burst; //or some other behavoiur like burst += 3 etc. } in game loop: ...


2

I can speak only for my self, but I implement my engine for sake of implementing it. It is fun for me. Plus the time spent learning an engine is roughly equal to implementing it yourself. It also gives you absolute control over the engine and you can specialize it for your task more easily (you would have to read pretty much everything about an engine, read ...


1

Rather then simply considering the mathematical differences among these formulae, I believe the genre of the game itself plays an important role concerning this issue. Here is something that pops up in my mind: Arcade fighting different parts of the body may have different "on damage" modifier skills/combos are the sources of the most obvious difference ...


1

Different browser games I've played used different strategies for this. All came down to resetting all players on a set time. One game dropped all new players in a new world with 400 at the same time, let them all compete against each-other until only one or a handful of alliances where remaining. A single round took about 1 month, and after that everybody ...


1

I'd like to examine two multiplayer class-based FPS games with support classes as case studies: Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory and Team Fortress 2. Both have separate classes that give health and ammo, and I think it's helpful to consider both types of support. Enemy Territory has three support functions - healing, reviving and ammo - given by two classes - ...


1

I would mention a few specific games (such as Stonehearth, which is where most of the Qubicle character images come from) but there are a ton of games, art (e.g. on DeviantArt), demos, movies, etc that use different styles. Hence, I suggest an image search. Search for voxel characters, blocky characters, and "qubicle" characters. (Yes, put "qubicle" in ...


1

Let's look at two examples of games that IMO do quite well to deter this behavior: Clash of Clans: In Clash of Clans, new players are given a small amount of starting gold and elixir and a 3-day shield. This shield prevents other players from attacking the new player, but is removed if the new player attacks other players. This gives the new player 3 days ...


1

You shouldn't have jittery movement / gameplay There are two ways that you can implement game logic - tied to a real time, or tied to the number of "turns"/processing steps. If some thingy in your game is moving leftwards, will it's motion be different if your stepLogic() was called 100 instead of 50 times? If your code treats the elapsed time explicitly ...


1

Here's what I normally do with my states. It might not be the best way, or even the second best (but remember, the thing that matters is not the architecture of your game code, but the actual end result.). I start with a basic State-class (all code in Pseudo-C++): class State { virtual void Event(Event e); virtual void Update(float deltaTime); ...


1

The only potential harm is to your power consumption, so don't do this on mobile devices. Conversely, quite a few embedded systems spend their entire lives in a loop waiting for things to happen. It used to be entirely normal to simply render game frames as fast as possible, sometimes without even a timer to compensate gameplay for different CPU speeds. ...


1

One of the best resources for mechanical design is pen and paper. Everything that happens on a computer happens one step at a time, which means you can prototype just about any part of your game using paper. As for what's best (you mentioned jump height), it's really a question of what's best for your game, so the best way to figure it out is to play with ...


1

I like exploring what the controls are without the game taking me by the hand for the first twenty minutes. Take your average (gamer) person and put them in front of a computer to play your game. Do they get stuck somewhere because of a lack of knowledge concerning controls? Then place a hint regarding that there.


1

cf. What is the point in designing your own car (e.g. to take part in an F1 race) if there are existing car manufacturers who will sell you cars that already work? I looked over some other answers here and in the proposed dupe questions and one point not really being championed is that creating your own system affords you more technical (and, as a ...


1

Sometimes for compactness a self-made engine ( Despite thousands of lines of code ) can be more compact than a pre-made engine due to the fact that unused features can be removed. Also keep in mind that if you write your own engine from scratch, you'll know all the ins and outs of it. If you ever want to add a feature or change something, you can! Some ...



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