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6

Yes, it's lazy design. But you have to understand that, apart from laziness, time and budget constraints may play a factor in how in-depth a game's puzzle-solving is. Each solution needs to be developed, coded, and tested, and the more you add, the more you have to deal with. Witness how buggy today's games get and you'll have an idea. There's also the ...


5

The rule of three sounds like good advice, but often times some of the funnest or best things go against practical advice and yet are still somehow fun or good. For instance, many argue that you need to hand hold a player into a game with an intro sequence that orients the player to their abilities. Legend of Zelda for nes dropped you into a world without ...


2

A simple solution would be to assign the doors IDs, where the matching pairs would share an ID, and have them send the player to the other door with the same ID. Or, if for whatever reason you find the need to make such IDs unique, you could assign door pairs matching IDs where one is negative and one is positive but the same absolute value, and when ...


2

For the A-star algorithm you must provide a data structure that, for vey legal current position of the agent, provides the set of possible moves from that location along with the cost of making that location change. The most common means of providing such a data structure, especially for a rectangular grid, is a 2D array of lists. However for more complex ...


2

Gameplay Design Technically, it depends on the style of gameplay you are designing. In some game genres, it is almost explicitly expected to have certain "save types". For instance, in online casual flash adventure/RPG games, you will often save every tiny change into a cookie so if the player accidentally (or intentionally) closes the browser, the game ...


2

If you don't use OpenGl library that does not implement open/save file dialog, you can avoid a lot of work(rendering text, folder browsing etc.) by using platform-specific code as your editor will likely run on single system anyway. Just ask you OS do it - quick, "cheap" and easy. Similar question was answered here for linux.


1

To make it easier for you to switch between world coordinates and grid coordinates, you should make two functions, projectToWorld and projectToGrid. pseudo code: /** * returns the topleft position of a given grid coordinate. */ function projectToWorld(gridX, gridY) { return new Vector2(TILE_WIDTH * gridY, TILE_HEIGHT * gridY); } /** * ...


1

Yes, you can. Physique, Skill and Will are just English words. They cannot be copyrighted. Game mechanics in general cannot be copyrighted, which is why you can find umpteen bazillion games that rip off D&D terms; not just generic words like Strength and Constitution but even very D&D-specific terms like THAC0 (and the entire original D&D armor ...


1

I had the reciprocal of what I should have been using. The math.h class's sin and cos function want the arguments in radians and m_ShipAngle is in Degrees. I was doing movementX = m_ShipVel * (cos(m_ShipAngle * 180 / PI)); movementY = m_ShipVel * (sin(m_ShipAngle * 180 / PI)); When I should have been doing: movementX = m_ShipVel * ...


1

Most games are interesting if you can play them with friends. Start simple, go complex. You can make the simplest possible game, and test if your friends like it. I bet they will give you more suggestions. KISS principle: keep is simple, stupid (check TeeWorlds for an example). It is much harder to make simple (to play) games, rather than complex and ...



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