Hot answers tagged

10

Why are you giving the player loot in the first place? It's a reward stimulus for the player. Games need a constant stream of reward stimulus (or at least the anticipation of a reward) to keep the player motivated to continue playing. The impact of a reward is not just determined by the mechanical effect (player now has 10 more gold to spend) but also by ...


5

When someone leads you by your hand, your body can't rotate but your head can. Separate the two interactions of rotating body and rotating head when it comes to the girl grabbing their hand. Make it a prompt for the player to look at the girl directly with both his body and head facing forward before this interaction can start. Once they do this, lock ...


4

I think it's best not to force the players viewpoint to do anything. You'd make users disoriented at best and make them sick at worst. Maybe trying to build some kind of cue similar to what FPS games do when you're taking damage from the side with a red flash on that side of the screen. I think that you could quite easily play on people's natural ...


3

While Jibb Smart already gave a good answer within the constraints of the question, I would like to step a bit outside the box and question: "Do you actually need perfect balance"? A perfectly imbalanced system can work too and often makes for far more interesting games. For example, you can have one weapon combination which is slightly better than 43 ...


3

The simplest way to do it would be to lay out your weapon combinations in whatever order you see fit in a circular list. Each combination could have a bonus against the 22 combinations after it in the list, and a weakness against the 22 before it. The player might appreciate a more straight-forward or easier-to-recognise logic to that order -- some sort of ...


2

There isn't really a standard - it's going to be dictated by the needs of your gameplay. For Splinter Cell, determining whether the player (or suspicious evidence) is seen by an AI is the heart of the stealth gameplay. We needed a lot of nuance - consideration of peripheral vision versus direct line of sight, illumination, AI alertness level, movement ...


1

The clearest way to make sense of any equation is to figure out the units. In this case, it's a bit ambiguous, but you know that velocity is m/h and that radius would be some kind of distance. v^2 is a good assumption in this case, but it is not immediately obvious why without knowing something about the units of the denominator. Just by looking at this, ...


1

In some games, mainly in fps, it can create a bit more of a thrill. Ex. if you are behind cover and out of ammo and you see a gun. Maybe you can reach it or you have to sprint across the open to grab it. Making it manual adds a little more skill and requires a bit more attention to be played by the player. Another reason is that a lot of games (like ...


1

I totally agree with @Blue and @Dar Brett about not messing with the player view. Aside from their excellent suggestions, let me add one thing. Maybe you could preserve the full immersion better if you allow the player to turn her body by using inverse kinematics? Consider that the player model is connected to the hand of the girl and if the player turns ...


1

Good tutorials are tricky. Cutscenes can be nice, but try to avoid too much infodumping. A long-standing rule of storytelling is "show, don't tell". It is usually better to tell the player almost nothing about the world beforehand and introduce the background as they play. Take, for example, the first hour of Half Life 2. There is a short intro cutscene, ...


1

As Alexandre commented, the best way to go about this is lots of work and testing. There is no simple solution or algorithm that can give you this answer. The tiniest change to any skill, stat, or other variable will directly affect the gameplay. Your best bet is to just give it whatever values you think will lead to the gameplay you want and tweak them as ...


1

In addition to the excellent and compact answer by Giorgio Liggio: is it standard practice to send positions as the synchronized state between a client and server instead of a velocity vector? You send both and use both, they complete each other in a fault-tolerant and stretchful way. In addition, you would send events, like "client just turned his ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible