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19

It certainly depends on the type of game, and as always, there are no foolproof ways to increase difficulty, but in my experience, I have found that making difficult games/levels is much, much more difficult than making easy games/levels. Some reasons that come to mind are: It is very easy to cross the line between difficult and plain impossible. I really ...


8

Do playtesting and see how the testers react to it. Possible complains the testers could have: Unnecessary or even misleading voiceovers distract from the gameplay Bad or inappropriate voiceovers break immersion Voiceovers which are repeated multiple times become annoying. Important voiceovers aren't understood because the player is distracted when they ...


4

If it's loaded from an image then you probably don't need flood fill, if you can access the palette table of the image to change colors and carry the change into the new representation of the image. If you are drawing the image programmatically then you probably do need flood fill and it's often trivial to do. If you could use vector images like SVG images ...


3

Platformer difficulty is about perfect timing of player actions. I would use 3 main approaches: Playtesting Let you level be played by players and adjust the difficulty appropriately. Simulating That will work for simple levels and parts of levels. Make a simulation with all the moves required to pass the level part and see how much they are allowed to ...


2

You're wasting CPU cycles. That means lower battery time on notebooks, tablets and phones, higher electricity bills, more heat generated by the machine, noisier fans. Also, you may be eating cycles from other important system processes (e.g. the window server could become jerky), which could then affect gameplay. Some system schedulers on today's pre-emptive ...


2

This is a generic answer to "how do I get other people to do things my way when I don't have a lot of power in this situation" but here goes: KISH: Keep It Super Helpful. Make it seem like you are totally on their side and you'll bust a gut to make it happen... but make sure you don't end up with responsibility for all the bad stuff that you foresee. Let ...


2

How many stat modifiers do you expect to be applied to these stats by the final part of the game? Is there a limit to how high these stats can go? Does the player gain these stat modifiers frequently or rarely? Do you want each new modifier to have a minor or major effect on the stats? Since we don't know anything else about your game, it seems that you ...


2

In theory, yes, practically it's very, very unlikely (or simply too expensive). You'd most likely have to pay the initial license owner, since other licensees might not be allowed to sub-license anything. We're typically not lawyers here and you should ask such questions a real lawyer if you're serious about something. Personal opinion: Screw the idea. :) ...


1

You can do something like this: // This is somewhere outside the update function var lastPoints = 0; // This is inside the update function if(currentPoints - lastPoints > 2000) { increaseHealth(); lastpoints = points; } This way you can infinitely increase the player hitpoints, until the points counter overflows.


1

The amount of levels is often designed to meet the amount of creatures, areas , techniques / powers and other types of game content. Levels are a way to classify content and reward the player. You may need more when you have more content to offer; levels reflect the time the player spent in the game and are used to classify content as appropriate to players ...


1

I'm going through your questions one by one. How are these scales and maximums determined? Is there some magical formula or a generic guideline (like from a game)? No, there is no magic formula whatsoever. The only rule of thumb is that people usually like round numbers. That is why there are so many games with max lvl 100 (or 99) and not max lvl ...


1

Yes, there are many. Game design is just like any art form, and minimalism can be done extremely well. Here's one example that comes to mind: http://superhotgame.com/ They make use of contrast (red vs. white) and slow motion (glass/people shattering) to get their cool factor.


1

The one alternative that could be used in the general case (with images like these): Applying the marching squares algorithm and getting a mesh for each area. Simplifying the 2d-mesh in a way similar to what is described here. Detecting clicks on the resulting mesh and changing it's diffuse color accordingly.


1

I would think you could get an assessment of a player's skill by tracking a few things, and various skill levels could be defined based on these items. As stated already, overall score could be one of them. I think examining how well a player does on a per ball level, will also give you a good gauge to go by. For instance, how long a single ball is in ...


1

When you say you're going to measure skill by points, it's circular reasoning / logic. How are you going to decide how many points the player deserves for each goal accomplished? You can't rate the player's skill by points cause in order to do that, you require the base assumption that the sum of points accurately reflects the challenge surpassed, which may ...


1

You would want to evaluate the player's skill using a set of recent data( three play-throughs) or something like that. As a user continues to play, their skill increases along with their familiarity of the game mechanics. Having a point threshold seems to be the best way to control a users skill. Naturally a person will have a couple good runs here and ...


1

If you'd like your game board to appear sharp, with lines of 1px width, at different resolutions, then you may be better off drawing your game board in the SVG vector format, using a tool like Inkscape or Illustrator. SVG files do have a nominal pixel resolution, as defined by the viewBox attribute of the SVG tag. This makes calculation of the positions of ...


1

This may not be exactly on-topic, but I want to add my two cents about the global experience on high difficulty : Please give a focus on player frustration. When I'm confronting a very difficult level that requires lot of deaths/replays, any tiny thing can make the player rage, especially if he can't focus on the difficult passage. More precisely: how far ...


1

Rule 1: Do not use random behavior in traps and enemies. This is why Roguelikes could be problematic if they are not fine tuned as randomness could create massive difficulty spikes if not handled correctly. The point is only making the game hard to beat; this may sound obvious but you also need to convey to the player what challenge they are facing and why ...



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