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1

As far as I know, the fixed timestep in Monogame is 60 per seconds, regardless of the monitor refresh rate. The statement "it runs 85fps because my monitor refresh rate it 85hz" is false. It just tries to give you 60 updates per second. It cannot guarantee it does, therefore using logic based on elapsed gametime is the best way to go. If you want another ...


0

The lag between when the user does something and when the result appears on the screen should never exceed 100ms or the user might notice the delay. The monitor of the user might take about 30 ms to display the picture it receives. Much faster monitors are available, but many average users don't have these. If the video card calculates 30 frames per ...


2

Yes, this is not only possible, but available now: hook up your game PC/console to a TV that uses motion interpolation. Opinions vary, and this is less suitable for twitch games like FPS due to the interpolation lag, but for upscaling frame rates from 60 to 120Hz it works fine. As for whether this can be done in the game itself, there's not enough impetus ...


8

Yes it's possible, but it's not without its complications. While frame interpolation can work real-time on videos, that isn't necessarily the case with video games. Even though this is processing real-time on videos, the software is able to "look ahead" to the next frame. This is a pretty critical component of interpolation. This is where the issue comes ...


0

One simple way would be to adjust the chance of the drop by dt. So instead of accumulators etc. you could do a simple multiplication: drop if dt * random <= threshold.


5

A system along these lines has been used in The Force Unleashed. I'm not aware of other titles that have used it though.


2

While this is not a perfect solution, you can say something like: if (random.NextDouble() / x < dt) { // Create particle... } How this works: For now, let's assume that you want an average of 1/second (so / x does nothing). If it's been one second since the last frame, you want an average of one particle to appear. random.NextDouble() always ...


0

Would this idea of an accumulator of probability work? float acc -> particle count accumulator float x -> particles per second float dt -> number of seconds since last frame update( dt ) { // increase the chance of a particle spawned this update acc += x * dt; // This case where you run at a very low frame rate, or that you want // A ...



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