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After some time and research, I got to know that you actually lose only one physics step, and not a whole game frame. And if you're updating your physics at a high rate (you should update it at least two times faster than the expected frame rate!), then it will probably go unnoticeable. In my game I'm using a 0.008s (125fps) physics step and can't barely ...


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EVE Online, an MMO with a single shard and up to several thousand plaers in big space battles runs its physics on a 1 Hz tick, called the "destiny" tick. http://community.eveonline.com/news/dev-blogs/fixing-lag-drakes-of-destiny-part-1-1/ The so called "Bloodbath of B-R5RB" is the biggest emergent player fight ever to happen in an online game to date ("the ...


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It's hard to tell for sure from the information given but it sounds like what you are trying to do is make the client and server run deterministic code such that if they start with the same starting state and process things on the same loop numbers that they will result in the same values for the same calculations. Is that correct? One thing you are doing ...


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Besides the other good answers given, I want to add the fact that some physics commonly is not driven by the server or even know about by the server and is a common trick to make the world seem more rich without adding overhead to the networking or server side processing. For instance there might be debris you can kick around on the ground or blowing around ...


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The answer is basically no, most fixed timesteps don't adjust the timestep if they cant keep up. The actual solution to this problem used depends on the needs of your game and the reasons that it can't keep up. If the reason that it can't keep up is rendering on the GPU, that means that the CPU is able to do more work even though the GPU isn't. In this ...


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Second Life implements physics on the server side using Havok, and locks updates to 45 per second. https://community.secondlife.com/t5/General-Discussions/SIM-FPS-is-maxed-out-at-45/td-p/181120 Earlier versions around 2005-2006 let the physics updates float as high as the server would allow. An uncomplicated region with few scripted objects could run at ...


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I've worked on a couple of game servers, including a suite of them for an MMO. In general, they don't have physics at all. In the few situations where physics are necessary (jumping, primarily) we let clients calculate their own physics, and we just deny anything that's too outlandish (players moving too fast for too long, going much higher than they ...


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Converting comment to answer: Yeah it totally will. You can try and hide it through predictive animations and other things, but that's all smoke and mirrors. It will affect responsiveness definitely. How bad it is depends on your frame rate of course. It also depends on the needs of your game. A twitch game like quake would show the problem very clearly ...



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