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20

One industry-sponsored study claims that only 22% of customers had a positive attitude toward social media advertising, and 8% of consumers abandoned an SNS (Social-networking sites) because of what they perceived as excessive advertising[1]. Schlosser, Shavitt and Kanfer reached the conclusion that users who "actively contribute content" view online ...


16

You need to use the Graph API that they provide. In my experience it changes pretty frequently and is not terribly well documented -- though that may have changed. One thing worth considering is whether you want your game to work solely on Facebook using their canvas or anywhere through the Connect API. The best clients seemed to be written in PHP (not ...


13

The Unity Player can be used on facebook. One relevant thread on integration: http://forum.unity3d.com/threads/7812-Unity3D-meet-Facebook! And one very popular game: https://www.facebook.com/uberstrike Here's a thread on Unity Answers that also has some more details: ...


11

Think about the general user base. A lot of players will own laptops that are about 768px high (most common around the 15.6" range of screens) so making it about 622px means that game will fit on the screen. There are some games that have a fluid canvas which resizes the game area to fit the browser window which is quite nice.


10

I think there are two basic problems with a global leaderboard: Cheating. And from a design standpoint, what does it do for the game experience? I would argue it actually detracts from a player's experience, unless a global ranking is somehow achievable. When I finish playing a game for the first time, have a couple hundred points, and then get shown that ...


9

Last I checked you cannot embed Google Adsense in a Flash game/app, because Adsense is HTML+JS, which cannot be put inside Flash. You could hover it over your Flash game...but there are compatibility issues, doesn't work on all OS/Browsers, and may cause UI bugs with your Flash game. You could try hacking the Adsense code so that it requests the ad data ...


7

Virality is usually measured by it's K-Factor. The two links in the wikipedia article there are helpful as well - the article on viral app objectives lays out things, and Jon Radoff's spreadsheet can be interesting to play with to figure out some of the interconnections between various factors. K-Factor represents the lifetime number of infections that a ...


7

Your best bet is to put google ads on the page next to your game.


7

This is kind of a nonsensical question based on a poor understanding of how Facebook apps work. Facebook doesn't really have anything to do with what technology exactly you are using; they simply embed your app as an iframe on their site. You build your app using whatever technology you want on your own server, and then simply tell Facebook what URL to point ...


6

You can use the Facebook Graph API for that purpose (there are several SDKs available). These are roughly the things you need to do: Create an app on Facebook. You can do this here. There you'll get your APP and API Keys that are needed for you to communicate with the Graph API. If your app wants to post to somebodies wall, he/she needs to grant your app ...


6

Requests were created for this purpose among others... App-generated requests: These requests can be initiated and sent only to users who have authorized your app. Developers can send these requests using the Graph API. Use these requests to update the bookmark count to encourage a user to re-engage in the app (e.g., your friend finished her move ...


6

I'm the creator of Trainyard for iOS. It's a puzzle game, and when players solve a puzzle, they can share their solution on Facebook, Twitter, or directly on the Trainyard site. I don't do in-app analytics, but I can tell you that players do use the buttons. You can do a simple twitter search to see the people that have tweeted from the game in the past ...


6

There is a great presentation by Ben Cousins called Playing To Win. On slideshare (with narration) - http://www.slideshare.net/bcousins/paying-to-win It describes the case of Battlefield Heroes game which was very popular but didn't monetize well and how they redesigned the entire virtual economy ecosystem to make it better. The main changes they did were: ...


5

I guess you probably know about the Facebook API Documentation. Other than that you can find various snippets and examples via Google but a lot of them still target the old Facebook API. Personally I found the API-Docs and the code-examples to be sufficient to get started, but this might vary depending on the programming-language you're going to use. ...


5

To answer question 3, check this out: http://flashgamelicense.com/ This site hosts developers and sponsors. Developers submit a tender for offers from sponsors and sponsors in turn bid on your game. At the end of bidding, you choose the offer that best matches your desired terms (cash vs. terms of offer). Sponsors typically then get a license to use your ...


5

Try using Flash Develop or if you are willing to spend some money Flash Builder. I have used both and would say they are comparable. Flash Builder is an Eclipse plug-in meaning it can integrate with the rest of your workflow a little better, but it is quite expensive. Another alternative is to download the Flex SDK (will likely need to do that for Flash ...


5

I think the Sword & Sworcery is a great example of how to effectively implement social media posting into a game. In this case it was strictly twitter, but I think they owe a large portion of their success to this feature. Instead of posting scores or progress in a traditional sense, all of the story in the game is broken into 140 character chunks, ...


4

Sorry if it seems judgmental, but I believe you are approaching the question from the wrong angle. Somehow I feel you would end-up prisoner of something you didn't expect if you started designing your game exclusively for Facebook. I believe the ideal is to make a true game (C++, PHP or HTML5 based) which integrates with any social network. The idea is to ...


4

I'm taking you to mean .swf size, for loading vs presentation? I found this link finding the average sizes for flash files. Most seem to be 1MB-5MB. As long as you have a decent loading screen that keeps people attracted, and it's not too much of a wait, then it'll be fine. On Facebook, everyone's bored. :P


4

Here's two methods not yet discussed: Microtransactions! These are the cheap extras that people can buy from within a game. These can be extra weapons, more maps or even just the other half of the game itself (treating the free offering as a demo version). There are three 'big' companies that make this easy for developers. Mochi's Coins make it very easy, ...


4

Depending on what sort of game you are trying to make, you will need some place to put the actual game. A Facebook App points to external websites for the canvas part of the application. This is your own webserver/webhotel and what ever language your webserver uses ought to provide you with some database connectivity. So if you eg. use PHP on the server, ...


4

When you redeem Credits with us we will redeem them at the rate of $0.10 per Credit, less a service fee of $0.03 per credit redeemed. If we change the service fee or redemption rate, the redemption rate and service fee in effect at the time you accepted a Credit as consideration will apply to that Credit. We will give you 30 days notice on the Facebook ...


4

You don't kneed to place a log-in button, and you don't need to set permissions. I found this Stack Overflow question that explains a quick way to do it just in javascript. The user is asked post the item to their wall, and they can either add a message and post or just skip it.


4

Based on experience, and according to current Facebook documentation, it is either 760px or fluid width: The canvas chrome is 760px width by default but you can set it to be a Fluid Canvas so that it is left aligned and takes up the full width and height of the user browser. Source: Apps on Facebook.com - Facebook Developers, Getting Started


4

I think what you're asking for is "do you need a complete website with index page and links, or can you just host game.html". If I'm right the answer is: no you don't need a real website. Aslong as facebook can access the game, and it is playable you're fine. I would not recommend it though, what if a player goes straight to that link in his browser ...


4

The shortest answer is "no", Facebook almost never gives away such placement for free. This is, literally, where they get all their money; Zynga (the big game developer) is the largest source of revenue Facebook has. While not universally true, a good rule of thumb is that if you see it, its for sale. The largest amount I've ever gotten free was $100 in ...


3

Check out the Mochi Media Scores API as a general purpose leaderboard system. If you could get the list of friend IDs from Facebook you might be able to leverage it to create one. DIY You probably already know how to do this yourself, but if you wanted to implement it, you could do something like this... First, create a database of scores, where each row ...


3

Google App Engine and AWS Simple Db would be a good starting point. They include some superb sample client code to get you going.


3

Here is a pretty interesting article on The Economics Of Facebook Games that might help with monetizing your game.


3

For developing a web game, i'd actually recommend learning HaXe. It has much friendlier syntax than ActionScript, as well as many more features you'll likely want (generics, automatic performance optimization, extra useful libraries, etc.). As Alex pointed out, FlashDevelop is a great tool to use and seems to be quite capable.



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