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1

I want to update this considering the new shader stages recently added. Someone more familiar can probably be more thorough, but: such as a car's front end destroyed when it hits a wall? The new stages allow you to more-cheaply enhance low-poly models. You could generate an entire vehicle from a single cube's-worth of vertices (8). Given a relatively ...


1

The game loop is normally called update() that would update everything that happens since the last frame, then draw() that draws the changes, your game loop will work to ensure both update and draw run frequently so that if a large calculation is being run, the game screen doesn't freeze. So your update method will be given a max time if competition, if it ...


2

Typically most of the more feature complete game engines actually have 2 game loops. The first is a fixed step loop aimed at iteration around every 16ms for that ideal 60fps zone. The second is the "as fast as possible" loop. The idea is that some actions like physics processing need to have some idea of process in order to be calculated correctly and ...


1

Your question is a good one. I've had exactly the same question regarding SpriteKit and have been very confused about the lack of information on the web about this. SpriteKit seems to encourage you to put all of your Model-View-Controller code into the same class (your SKScene subclass), which is really confusing to me. How would you ever build a game of ...


2

The main importance in a case like this is to be able to use hardware acceleration and being able to upload your map to the GPU for smooth zooming. Usually using a game engine tends to restrict how you access the hardware, whereas using OpenGL/WebGL directly will not get in your way (but also won't assist you with common tasks either). In this case it ...


1

Hmm, you raised an actually interesting point there, but what do you actually mean by the term legal action? That does matter a lot in this case. And another thing, the creators of those engines aren't forcing you to use their engines. So it won't be possible that you can take an action on them. The only thing that you are able to do is to report a bug to ...


9

I'm fairly certain that no, you cannot take legal action against the creators of software because of a bug. I'm not even sure how you get this idea, and what specifically you would sue them for. There are known bugs (as Kelly said), and probably also unknown ones, but you have to think about the likelyhood of you even encountering these bugs, and even then ...


19

It can be assumed that all non-trivial software contains bugs. Unreal Engine 4 has a bugtracker here. Unity has a bugtracker here. If you browse these sites you can see the many known issues with these engines. The licensing agreements for these engines (and most software generally) will contain clauses similar to this: No Warranty. THE ...


0

I made a text adventure engine myself because I wanted something very minimal and that didn't require hosting. It's called gist-txt. It's very easy to use: you just need to create a new GitHub Gist with at least an index.markdown file in it. Then go to the URL http://potomak.github.io/gist-txt#<your-gist-id> to play your text adventure. You can see ...


1

This usually depends. Are the sprites static? If they are, you could use a Vertex Array for storing all of your static geometry and such. I believe there is an example of this in the SFML tutorials, under Vertex Arrays. This is a great way to store maps, but it isn't always suitable for moving sprites, like the player sprite. ...



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