New answers tagged

2

Unity can be used for your simple text based game, which you should not have any difficulty making with its new UI features. Though the people who have mentioned that the a feature rich engine such as unity is not required to make a simple game like that. I would say that there is no harm in using it. It also makes deployment to platforms relatively easier ...


1

This question skirts close to off-topic "what technology to use" territory, but I'll try to keep from getting bogged down in this-product-vs-that details, and look at it more in terms of general development process... Philipp is right that using a full-featured 3D engine for a text game is using a sledgehammer to crack a nut, ie. much more power than you ...


7

It depends on whether this happens during development or release. During development, you will have all kinds missing things, errors, and fuck-ups, constantly, all the time, and you may even want to "hot" load assets on demand or replace an asset while the game is running. You might edit scripts with the game running to test an AI performs better, or ...


12

Byte56 mentioned one option. There is at least one other: Assume default values and display a Warning. Depending on the nature of your data, it might be perfectly acceptable to assume some default values and warn the user that "since file xxx failed to load, we are using a generic yyy object."


44

Log an error and gracefully exit. Ideally, display a human readable error on screen as well. There should be a core pipeline of hard coded functionality that operates without these data files. It's the same pipeline that loads the data files in the first place. It should be capable of detecting when these core data files are corrupt or otherwise faulty and ...


2

Whether or not you decouple your window creation from your engine code is up to you. You can do it both ways. If you don't handle window creation in your code, you'll expect the user of your code to handle it. That will include forwarding window events to you somehow -- probably by calling interface methods on your game engine object you define for them. ...


0

You usually have some kind of "main loop" in your game that runs continuosly. Depending on wether your game is multithreaded or not, this "main loop" looks different. In a single threaded environment, your main loop usually looks like this time = current time while game is running deltaTime = (current time) - time // custom logic // e.g. ...


0

You can tag the tree in your group and then use FindGameObjectWithTag to get a list of all them. Next iterate over the list and destroy the game objects.


0

Treat all the chunks around player, as offsets (shown in one axis but applies for both): -3 -2 -1 0 +1 +2 +3 <- 7 offsets for 1 axis; for x * y that would be 49 offsets. 0, 0 is the offset where the player is - the origin of "player space". 3, -2 might be roughly to the northeast or whatever, depending on your coordinate system setup, and so forth. Now ...


0

You can try rendering objects in order of their Y position of the bottom of the sprite/object. Closer to the bottom of the screen = closer to the viewer and therefore obscures anything higher up than it. This isn't very flexible but it is simple.


1

It depends on how your software architecture looks. When you have a clear separation between user input, ai input, game mechanics and graphic engine, then you should be able to simply switch out the ai input with a second user input. But when you have tight coupling between the AI code and the other components of your game, then it might be quite a lot of ...


0

It's a lot harder than you think (Judging by your words), plus being able to create a game doesn't mean you are able to handle multiplayer gameplay. I don't know about specific engines, some might help you with online gameplay, but talking just about code: You need a server (or servers) (Even if the game is based on 1v1 gameplay, you need a place to store ...


-1

http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-670/specifications Nvidia homepage says only 4.2 is supported. Check the error logs and for any other opengl error and fix them if any.


1

I'm running a pc with: 2.4Ghz Quadcore, 8GB Ram and GT630M 2GB and it runs just fine. The only thing that has speeded up the visual studio database is my SSD i got for christmas. I would suggest to try it out and see if it works. Just dont run on max settings if your FPS is very low.



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