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12

There's no industry standard, but most high-profile studios do create a game design document. Game development, after all, encompasses quite a number of fields, so there will often be a combination of storyboarding, UML for the programming side, a script for dialogue, and so on. That being said, the number one "modelling language" I've encountered: flow ...


8

First, patent legislation varies by country. This GamaSutra article references a number of gameplay patents which have been granted in the US. (The article also recommends that game developers should patent their game mechanics, which I strongly disagree with, but that's another matter entirely.) Specifically: United States Patent No. 6,604,008, ...


5

You probably won't find documentation available that's as good or better than MSDN, any specific questions / problems, search here and elsewhere online and if you're still not sure post a question. That said, take a look at the Education Catalog at the App Hub. While not documentation, it provides many samples and lots of useful information. Also, take a ...


4

Once upon a time Midway had a patent on "ghost cars" used to race against your previously recorded attempts. There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy. Gamasutra discussion on Ghost Cars


4

"Skip hard parts in a game (by pushing a 'hint' button) and let the game 'video-walk you through that part' (ie. skip it by seing how it can be done) : http://kotaku.com/5127251/nintendo-patent-reveals-potential-paradigm-shift-in-design By Nintendo O_o Among others: Namco patent on load-time mini-games (US Patent Number 5,718,632) ...


3

From some old (2006/2007) presentation on MSN Games... RAPID! Integration Test Tool Allows developers to test that the MSN API is correctly implemented It does not: Verify client requirements Doesn't test the game play Links to the main site is here MSN Games and the developer resources are here To get access to the developer libs you'll need to ...


3

Videogames are very different from the kind of software that Joel is talking about. In several ways. For example, Joel talks about taking the "spec" to "the customer". Yeah, that's not how videogames work. When was the last time you heard of Shigeru Miyamoto taking a design document out to the public and asking if a feature filled their needs? Game ...


3

A spec doesn't prevent issues, it just creates them at a different point, but you probably still won't recognise them until the implementation. Writing a specification only serve two purposes, helping you remember your thoughts and sharing those thoughts with your team mates. Writing down your thoughts is not going to make them better, it may force you to ...


2

Whoa, sounds like you're going for a "design up-front" model, i.e. waterfall. That works, but for stuff like games, a more iterative model works better. What I mean is: have a general idea what your game is about. Know, at least, the main core mechanic of your game. Rotating blocks to make lines (Tetris)? Running to the end goal of a platformer level ...


2

Just to add to George's great answer: The DirectX documentation (on MSDN) contains many additional details that the XNA documentation does not provide. XNA is a wrapper over DirectX, after all. Often you can easily guess (or check using PIX or perhaps ILSpy) the underlying DirectX methods that XNA is using, and then look up the documentation for those to ...


2

The API in question is, I believe, the MSN Games GDK for developing games for the MSN Games portal (or Live Messenger). The SDK itself is not readily available to the public; I believe you need to contact developer support to get it. Check out this page at the MS Casual Games portal.


2

The reference manual is up to date in the nvidia site Cg 3.0 Reference Manual, which i believe is where you can get most of the information you want. It does contain very detailed data of everything you can do with Cg, I don't think there's something missing there, but it may be hard to read at first as it's just a reference for all the technical aspects of ...


2

MonoGame's documentation portal is here. They don't appear to currently have an API reference as of this writing. I would venture to guess that this is because MonoGame's API tries to be identical to XNA's, so you can probably get away with just using XNA's API reference. The focus of the MonoGame project appears to be on longer-form documentation like ...


1

When you call Unload() on the ContentManager it will internally call Dispose() on any object that was loaded that implements the IDisposable interface (which SoundEffect does). Therefore yes, it is deterministic that calling Unload() on the ContentManager will stop all SoundEffect instances as they are being disposed. Shawn Hargreaves wrote a nice blog post ...


1

Take a look at how RFCs are done. Here's one for the client-side IRC protocol. There is no set standard but Backus-Naur form (and extensions) are widely used. The upside of using BNF is that there exist tools that will output the code that obeys the protocol. This means that instead of doing Manual C# => Autogenerated Document protocol, you could do Manual ...



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