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11

Yes! Indie developers tend to be very social. Without knowing which city you live in, it's tough to say what's available, but check out the IGDA's chapter list: http://www.igda.org/chapters Though these events include students and non-indie industry members, your fellow indies will often be there in force. For example, here in Boston, we have the Boston ...


10

TIGSource has a forum for get-togethers at http://forums.tigsource.com/index.php?board=15.0


4

If you're in NYC: http://www.nycgameindustry.com/


4

I have found that it's best to have something to start with. Then it's easier to list the things that need to be added or fixed, and divvy those out. So you might consider pair programming at first, just to get some basic stuff running and some organized code laid out. Just schedule a few hours one day, both of you sit down, one of you be the coder (or ...


3

We've got a chat for these things too, by the way. :) For talking to random strangers on the internet: From personal experience, it's better to be able to say "hey, look, want to help me improve this prototype?" than "I'm looking for someone to code a game with". People come and go: Don't be afraid to start something yourself! As for actually working on a ...


3

The best possible choice here is actually to find and meet other local game developers who are interested in working with you on a project. If you're not in a big city, then maybe you'll have to make a trip to one every month or so. If you're completely in the middle of nowhere, however, then you might need to look for people online. The best possible way ...


2

Personally, I think you NEED a server for managing files, assets, versions, etc. Yet for a 2-man project, SVN can be tricky to learn when you never used it (for making merges for exemple), but still it's a good tool and completely free. For dividing tasks, it highly depends on the time you two will need to complete tasks. In video games, tasks are really ...


2

Portland, Oregon, USA: http://pagdig.org has a monthly get together


2

Each of you make a small quick and dirty prototype, or draft a design doc. Everyone plays each others games, or reads design docs of each others. Everyone votes on the game they want to make. Ties are settled by a 1d20 roll. This has the benefit of everyone actually analyzing the validity of their idea. And once you decide, you have something already made ...


2

In San Francisco: http://www.meetup.com/sfgamedevelopers/ and http://www.unknownworlds.com/postmortem Both very active monthly meetups.


1

I'd say to prototype the toy (not the game, just the part that don't have an "end") of every idea. Don't need to polish too much, nor have music or menu. Remember, it's just a toy prototype. Play for a while with every one of them, if it feels good, it's a good candidate. Just remember to account for complexness... A complex game to build probably won't ...


1

For anyone in Seattle please join us at the Seattle Games Co-op. We currently meet twice a month, once to present a topic of interest -- say Blender or Linear Algebra -- and once just to hang out and have a beer. We're always looking for fellow game developers to participate and we're planning a lot of great stuff for the future, so get involved now!


1

In Chicago, in addition to the IGDA chapter, there is also Indie City Games.


1

For the Cambridge, UK indie scene, including Chris Delay of Introversion and the creator of VVVVVV, see Cambridge Friendship Club.



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