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Welcome to gamedev.stackexchange! Background research: I feel that some of your curiosity such as #4 could/should be answered with your own personal research and playtime. With that said, most of your question seem to be revolving around using generators and chance. There has been a lot of research and experimentation into this by game designers, and for a ...


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This is hugely dependent on the type of the game you're creating. For say Chess, the only thing NetworkClient would do is reacting on the move being made and sending that. Some other games might send parts of their state or even the whole state. In general, you might think about splitting the networking part into two smaller components: the transport that ...


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You can also use the MVVM (Model-View-ViewModel) pattern instead of MVC. You can read the article on wikipedia. I also like this article on codeproject. Whereas it is mostly used together with WPF, Silverlight, etc. in the .NET world it is also used by AngularJS for example. So MVVM could be an alternative for you. It is hard to exaplain software ...


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Lets call everything that happens inside a game an event for the duration of this answer. The events that occur in a game are not "observing" the game model. They happen every x frames. Rendering for instance happens every frame and the view doesn't need to care if the model changed or not since the previous frame. It normally will render every frame. This ...


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It's not necessary, in the sense that you can make it work. But your approach is somewhat... awkward. In your approach, the pre-render and post-render work (such as clearing the appropriate render targets, and then presenting the final frame the screen) has to be done before and after getUserInput(): while (game_is_running){ prepareForRender(); ...



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