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29

I'm assuming you're talking about on-site playtesters and not internet beta testers. Rule #1: Don't help them. Frustration should be the top thing you should be checking for. The ideal situation would be a two way mirror with your team on one side and the playtester on another with one video camera on their face and another on the screen. Obviously this ...


15

From your diagram, it looks like the geometry you're constructing contains T-junctions - places where a vertex of one triangle is supposed to lie exactly on another triangle's edge (resulting in one edge meeting another in a "T" shape). Due to the limitations of finite-precision arithmetic, the vertex usually cannot be guaranteed to meet the edge perfectly ...


12

Just discovered this for iOS Developers - AsyncSocket You set up a server in your application and connect to it via terminal. You can then pump over remote commands and start manipulating variables in real-time. Pretty slick. Mystery Coconut Games blog post about it Google Code page for AsyncSocket


12

To expand on the data is king sentiment a bit (+1 to Tetrad!): Investigate recording and playback: If your game is deterministic and frame-based you may only need to store an initial random seed and a tuple of (key/button state, joystick/mouse coords, frame #) any time the input state changes. Playback is as simple as redirecting your input to this ...


9

It sounds like you really want to implement some kind of deployed profiling option, not logging in general (while you could use logging to surface the results of your profile data, logging in general isn't really required here because there are better ways to surface the data). The basic premise will be to have some fairly lightweight methods/objects you ...


9

You need to register as an XBLIG Developer in order to run and debug on your Xbox. To debug on your PC you can set up an additional windows game project (XNA runs on Windows as well). Then you would have two projects, one XBox and one Windows that run the same game. You just want to make sure that your solution is set up to be cross platform. The only ...


6

I just found the answer to my problem: The reason why the exception wouldn't show off is because it was actually thrown on a different thread. So removing my existing try/catch blocks in the main thread was of no help to show the exception. Adding a try/catch block to the Main method (to catch anything thrown in the entire application) wouldn't help either, ...


6

Don't create a random generator in each call to the AddParticle() method. It will return always the same value. Also you may want to pass a different seed to the the generator each time you create it, then you can use DateTime.Now.Millisecond as seed. static readonly Randomnum = new Random(DateTime.Now.Millisecond); public void AddParticle() { ...


6

UPDATE As of December 2012, Gremedy has released a version of their software with the license mechanism disabled. It's available for download here. Version 5.8.1 Changed: Licensing mechanism disabled, it is no longer needed to acquire a free license to run gDEBugger. The gDEBugger from gremedy appears to have been abandoned. Their forums have ...


6

Yes, you need to select each device in the DDMS perspective to get the LogCat output from the relevant device because that window is on a per device basis, but other than that there's nothing preventing you from debugging multiple instances at once.


5

Ofcourse this depends a lot on... a) what kind of testing you want to have done, and b) what kind of game you are testing, and c) what kind of testers and infrastructure you have available... It also differs a lot if you are testing for a) functionality, b) balancing c) game-design But in general you might want to consider these aspects... *a) Choose the ...


5

you can try creating log files, although they may a be a bit hard to work with but they are useful in many ways: using log files you can replay your game with all the things happen in it including the bugs! so in case of rare bugs you can check the bug again and again until you solve it. using log files you can monitor your variables without stopping your ...


4

Kind of a simple advice here but a little something that I found very useful is displaying debugging strings/rectangles to the screen. You can print the player's current state, the enemy's animation state, the number of active bullets, the frames per second, etc. All these simple variables are what make up the core of your game, so it's essential that they ...


4

A couple of things that I do when debugging games: Use a console to output relevant information. Output debug data directly on top of your game screen. Since you are dealing with a game loop, breakpoints are sometimes quite difficult to use when debugging such things as character movement. Displaying the data you want to verify on screen while you are ...


4

Integrating a fully interpreted language can allow you to rewrite game elements very, very easily on the fly. Python, Lua, etc. can all be utilized expressly for this. Angel Engine probably can serve as an example. Hot loading is another element to check out (basically, an event is fired off telling you an asset has changed--a config file, an art element, ...


4

http://www.ogre3d.org/tikiwiki/Simple+Text+Output&structure=Cookbook Simple as adding the 40 lines class file to your project loading a font of your choice and calling TextRenderer::getSingleton().printf("text", "Last FPS: %f", renderwindow->getLastFPS()); from your update method body. Don't forget to initialize and remove the text overlay! ...


4

You can launch a external debugger... you only have to add the line System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Launch() and you will can debug it. I think that you maybe need Visual Studio Professional or the .Net Framework Sdk to use this solution... it was needed with the old xna frameworks, now I'm not sure.. ...


4

Unity only renders a limited number of pixel lights at a time; exactly how many depends on the quality level. The most 'important' pixel lights are chosen, and brightness is a significant part of how 'important' a light is.


4

Instead of grabbing the system time and calculating the delta time each frame, just keep the delta frame time constant in the debug build (deltaTime is just always 16ms, for example). This way each simulation frame has a fixed time step regardless of how much debugging you did in between frames. Of course this should only be done in your debug build.


4

As I mentioned in my comment, your conditionals don't make any sense. The first will never execute and the 2nd is redundant. In the redundant conditional, you're setting velocity to zero when velocity is less than zero. Stew on that for a moment. velocity.x = Mathf.Lerp(velocity.x, 0, deaccelerationSpeed); if(Mathf.Abs(velocity.x) < 0.0001f) velocity.x = ...


3

Definitely Agree with Tetrad's Rule #1. Do not help them. I would say a caveat is to explain to them that you will not be helping them, and if they need help to please ask. This way the player doesn't end up being frustrated. The Questionnaire should ask open ended questions, instead of ones that are simple yes/no, depending on the age and number of testers ...


3

As Tetrad mentioned, get as much objective data as you can. Putting in hooks to store certain events and dump those all to a .csv isn't very hard. And once you've got it in Excel, you can study, graph and plot until the cows come home. Also, have specific questions you're looking to answer. Scientists don't just sit down, fire up some experiments and "do ...


3

By using the iOS simulator that comes with the (free) iOS development kit you can achieve a lot; but profiling is generally tricky. Run it with the debug console; but do the major testing in Safari. (Not Mobile Safari, but the desktop version.) This should help you root out most actual errors. As for performance, there's not a lot more you can do than to ...


3

You did everything correctly, however you must run in "Debug" mode - ie press regular F5, not CTRL+F5. Do not choose "start without debugging" from Visual Studio. Edit I don't actually use #define D3D_DEBUG_INFO, but according to this post you should #define that before including the d3d9 headers. Also be sure you have set to use the Debug version of ...


3

Although I am not sure, NVIDIA Nsight should be able to debug Shaders, at least I think it supported GLSL in some previous version (that you should be able to find). It integrates quite OK with Visual Studio, is not easy but has loads of useful things, but in the older versions you needed 2 machines with a GPU each to debug shaders through a network (while ...


3

No, there is no way from OpenGL to change how your GPUs distribute your shaders across its internal computing resources. The job of the driver is to find an optimal distribution for the work you provide it.


3

What you want to do is homogenize the interface to that information, so that the debug menu itself need only deal with a single concrete API to get information concerning what it needs to display. Your first step, thus, is to ask yourself "what information do I need?" At a bare minimum, I would expect a debug menu to display key-value pairs: the name of a ...


2

I know Sean James already said it. But seriously, Visual Studio (specifically the debugging tools) is terrific for this. I don't use C++ much these days, so I'm not sure about how well these apply there. But for C# (including in C# Express) you have: Edit and Continue - where you can make wholesale changes to your game logic. The Watch Window - where you ...


2

HTTP Logging is a huge help, and not difficult to get up and running. You can even use Google App engine as a quick way of getting this running. Data is always useful. Scripts & XML these can be reloaded on the fly and require no reset. Allow them to fail without bringing down the game. This gives a lot of power to artists, testers and designers. ...



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