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Blood, sweat and tears beers For the movie-quality cinematics you see from companies like Blizzard, they are often following a process similar (albeit on a smaller scale) to the processes of professional movie studios like Pixar. This involves professional 3D artists, modellers, animators, etc, as well as various high-end technologies like 3DS Max, Maya, ...


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The creation process is very similar to building geometry for games. Same tools for modeling & animation Max, Maya, zBrush. Most characters for current gen are built to extremely high detail for normal map generation anyway, so often those assets can translate easily to the pre-rendered realm. The main differences are in shader complexity, rendering, and ...


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They use a product like 3DS Max or Maya.


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Step 1: Create assets in 3d program (3DS Max, Maya or blender) Step 2: Rig assets Step 3: Animate the needed animations on the rigged assets Step 4: Create the scene, render and record.


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It depends what kind of cutscene you want. Some games have a comic book style cutscene where images would be the best option. Unless you're trying to actually make a 30 fps video out of images. Then a video would be the way to go. A third option is to actually do it in game by using the character models and animating those. This gives a smooth transition ...


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I will tell you something from my experience and personal understanding off the matter. First of all, I'd contact the company marketing section. use your official company email - *no @gmail/@yahoo.com etc..* If I were to write to Ford, I'd use their Contact Form and choose the "Other" inquiry type. Say why I would like to use their intelectual property in ...


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One of our (ArenaNet's) developers wrote a blog entry about how cinematics for Guild Wars 2 are created. There's also an accompanying video by our cinematic art lead -- this may not be exactly what you're after, though, since it's not fully pre-rendered 3D. Back when I was a graphics programmer at Big Huge Games, we contracted with Blur for some of our ...


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A common method is to record a movie, encode it to a file such as Mpeg-4, and use the iPhone's selection of video controls to play that movie back. The movie itself can be produced in a variety of ways: e.g. Live action; Computer generated images using a CGI package such as Autodesk's 3ds Max or Maya; Play out your scene using your own game and record it ...


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Most companies have a cinematic team that is separate from the game development team. The models and scenes used in cinematics are often of a level of detail that would be completely unplayable in a live game, so it's likely the only shared assets are concept art. Large studios like Blizzard (I believe at least one of Sony's various sub-corps has one too) ...


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Broad and hard questions, there is a ton of ways to engineer this. But i would go with something like an interface for a "Game" module, and then code different games from there. That way you could have an array of pointers to different classes which is different mini-games, but comes from the same pure virtual interface. I think a good idea is to read some ...


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I would suggest paintings with subtle animations in a comic like presentation. If you are lucky you might find a talented young artist that will spend his/her free time to get their art exposed in a game. A good example of awesome "2D" cutscenes are the mini-cutscenes before missions in Warhammer40k: Chaos Rising. It's basically paintings overlain on an ...



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