Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

Blood, sweat and tears beers For the movie-quality cinematics you see from companies like Blizzard, they are often following a process similar (albeit on a smaller scale) to the processes of professional movie studios like Pixar. This involves professional 3D artists, modellers, animators, etc, as well as various high-end technologies like 3DS Max, Maya, ...


5

The creation process is very similar to building geometry for games. Same tools for modeling & animation Max, Maya, zBrush. Most characters for current gen are built to extremely high detail for normal map generation anyway, so often those assets can translate easily to the pre-rendered realm. The main differences are in shader complexity, rendering, and ...


5

They use a product like 3DS Max or Maya.


4

Step 1: Create assets in 3d program (3DS Max, Maya or blender) Step 2: Rig assets Step 3: Animate the needed animations on the rigged assets Step 4: Create the scene, render and record.


4

It depends what kind of cutscene you want. Some games have a comic book style cutscene where images would be the best option. Unless you're trying to actually make a 30 fps video out of images. Then a video would be the way to go. A third option is to actually do it in game by using the character models and animating those. This gives a smooth transition ...


2

One of our (ArenaNet's) developers wrote a blog entry about how cinematics for Guild Wars 2 are created. There's also an accompanying video by our cinematic art lead -- this may not be exactly what you're after, though, since it's not fully pre-rendered 3D. Back when I was a graphics programmer at Big Huge Games, we contracted with Blur for some of our ...


2

Most companies have a cinematic team that is separate from the game development team. The models and scenes used in cinematics are often of a level of detail that would be completely unplayable in a live game, so it's likely the only shared assets are concept art. Large studios like Blizzard (I believe at least one of Sony's various sub-corps has one too) ...


2

A common method is to record a movie, encode it to a file such as Mpeg-4, and use the iPhone's selection of video controls to play that movie back. The movie itself can be produced in a variety of ways: e.g. Live action; Computer generated images using a CGI package such as Autodesk's 3ds Max or Maya; Play out your scene using your own game and record it ...


2

I will tell you something from my experience and personal understanding off the matter. First of all, I'd contact the company marketing section. use your official company email - *no @gmail/@yahoo.com etc..* If I were to write to Ford, I'd use their Contact Form and choose the "Other" inquiry type. Say why I would like to use their intelectual property in ...


2

One wav for the whole scene can turn into a big headache if you want to alter the scene later, even a minor one. And if any of the players have a problem during the playback (memory, CPU, bug...etc), the rest of the audio will be asynchronous. Players will skip the scene or close the game without you knowing about that. Which will throw away all your ...


1

Using a separate file for each line is going to be much easier to deal with. Here's why: Typically, several segments will require multiple takes, since actors stutter or misspeak. If the actors are being recorded together, you'll need to merge these takes into a final cut. If you need to change something, you'll have to edit the entire sequence (changing ...


1

Broad and hard questions, there is a ton of ways to engineer this. But i would go with something like an interface for a "Game" module, and then code different games from there. That way you could have an array of pointers to different classes which is different mini-games, but comes from the same pure virtual interface. I think a good idea is to read some ...


1

I would suggest paintings with subtle animations in a comic like presentation. If you are lucky you might find a talented young artist that will spend his/her free time to get their art exposed in a game. A good example of awesome "2D" cutscenes are the mini-cutscenes before missions in Warhammer40k: Chaos Rising. It's basically paintings overlain on an ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible