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Yes. Modern 3D graphics use a per-fragment (essentially, per-pixel) depth buffer to handle these scenarios correctly. Rendered geometry (your person, your windmill arm) passes through the transformation pipeline, ultimately arriving in screen space with a screen space depth (distance from the eye point) for every vertex. That depth is interpolated over the ...


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If you're simply trying to minimize resource impact, @DisturbedNeo is right on the money. If there are other reasons you'd like to do this, you could always use a VERY large collider and check for objects inside of it that meet a certain tag criteria.


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You may not need to include Occlusion Culling for a 2D game in Unity. Unity has a thing called FrustumCulling that hides any object not in view of the camera. In a 3D game, this isn't always ideal because the frustum doesn't account for distance, meaning that the game would still do things like render rooms behind doors that you can't technically see. ...


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Well, at the end it was a mistake in my game data, after update the game data everything worked perfectly, but also did some changes, instead of keep geometric approach algorithm for get all six planes what I did is change to OpenGL Extract Planes from http://gamedevs.org/uploads/fast-extraction-viewing-frustum-planes-from-world-view-projection-matrix.pdf it ...


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You have to make the objects static which will be the part occlusion culling. The sprites/objects that will not move in runtime will have to be marked as static before baking. Make the objects static then system will get some renderer to work on. Then bake. Occlusion culling is valid on only 3D mesh's. 2D sprites are not supported type. It's used on 3D ...



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