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271

World of Warcraft has: 5,500,000 – Lines of code 1,500,000 – Art assets 33,681 – Production tasks 70,167 – Spells 37,537 – NPCs (non-player characters) 27 – Hours of music 2600 – Quests in the original World of Warcraft 2700+ - Additional quests in WoW: The Burning Crusade 2350+ - Additional quests in WoW: Wrath of the Lich King 7650+ - Quests total (how ...


163

The first problem is that the software itself is very complicated, particularly for a new or inexperienced game developer. You have to maintain (at the very least) a client and server application while providing more content than you would expect for a "regular" multiplayer or single-player game. Even on their own as a single player game, an RPG with the ...


78

The thing to remember is that an MMO is literally the most complicated piece of software one can make. Take every single problem that exists in software engineering, and you have it in an MMO. A) Every problem from a normal game. 1) Resource streaming for an open world. 2) Particle system running on 5 year old commodity hardware 3) Physics system to ...


61

It's not so much hard to develop an MMO, as to develop another World of Warcraft. If you're willing to settle for only having a few thousand players, you can make an MMO, such as: A Tale in the Desert (created by one person) ATITD Wikipedia Sherwood Dungeon (created by one person) How one man made an MMO Maid Marion Wikipedia Runescape Latest Version ...


42

I'll disagree with most of the popular posts on here and say that it's really NOT that much work to create an MMO. But don't confuse MMO with WOW. Really, the idea of an MMO can be broken down into: O - Online. This is a game played over the net M - Multiplayer. Not just you. M - Massive. This implies that you are playing multiplayer with people you ...


27

I asked myself the same question a long time ago. The best way to answer it is this: Design the simplest, dumbest MMO you can imagine. Say, each player is a little ball rolling around, doing absolutely nothing but watch other players. Use, no textures, just solid colors. No lighting, no combat, no interactions. Nothing. Simple, right? Now write it, complete ...


22

Easy answer The cost of running an MMO? In United States Dollars? ITS OVER 9000 (dollars)!!!!! Useful Answer Scope of question So, dividing your question up into chunks, you seem to want to know about the costs of: Development (making the game) Marketing (making people aware of the game) Infrastructure (base cost of server hardware and supporting ...


19

Depends on the game and the people making it. There are common sources for nearly any product being created, games aren't that different, but the below are tailored slightly more towards games: Publisher: A company that partners with a development studio to create a game. This is very much like an investor below, but the publisher will typically have ...


16

I have not worked with Valve or released a game on Steam, but I attended a talk given by some guys that just released their first indie game on Steam. I doubt you'll hear much from them if you're in pre-alpha. He said that when they first contacted Valve, they were told not to send screenshots or demos or anything due to legal reasons. They didn't get much ...


15

Somewhere between $20M and $100M would be reasonable depending on genre for a AAA game. XBLA/PSN downloadable games often cost much less, and people have made XBLIG games for a few hundred dollars in their spare time. As a recent example, APB was rumored to have cost $100M (MMOs are among the most expensive games to produce).


12

Unlike most of the other posts in this thread, I'm going to go the other way and say making an MMO is actually not that hard if you make realistic goals for it. I made an MMORPG myself when I was in high school, which took about 8 months to put together. It got to the point of having just over 1000 users and an average of 80 on at a time before my ISP made ...


12

None of the other answers addressed a basic misconception in your question: the iOS SDK does not cost any money. You can download Apple's developer tools for free. However you will only be able to test in the simulator for free; in order to deploy onto device you need to purchase the $99/year developer registration. The fee is for the ability to publish, ...


11

The Airplay SDK: http://www.airplaysdk.com/ as well as some other other mobile SDKs, will let you make iOS games for free (in the sense that you don't have to buy a Mac), but I believe it will still cost $100 to get your game on the app store, no matter what tool you use. The Android is free to develop for and deploy to (Edit: per the comment by Ricket, ...


9

Depending on your location and how awesome an office and benefits you're looking at, (in the US) you can count on $8,000 to $15,000 per developer per month. This is the fully loaded cost and includes IT and HR costs as well as equipment and other infrastructure. For $8000 per person-month, though, you're going to be in a pretty crappy warehouse on the ...


8

Lots of reasons: Supporting hundreds or thousands of players introduces a lot of problems. For the programmers, its essentially a giant N^2 problem. For example, imagine something as simple as updating a players position. In addition to dealing with internet latencies, once the position update reaches the server from the player's machine it now needs to be ...


8

There's too many undefined or barely defined terms there. MMO is such a loaded term. Without knowing how much CPU processing a user needs, how much backend storage a user needs, etc... It's impossible to say. I mean just at a bare minimum assuming the hardware can support it, you would need 8 front end servers just to support 500,000 connections. (TCP ...


7

At the time of this posting, the basic iPhone and Android licenses will cost a total of $800 along with the free version of Unity. For future reference, here are the Shop and License Comparisons: Shop License Comparisons


7

Colleague of mine was looking for a freelance 3d-artists lately, I've got to participate a bit. From what I gathered, there are a lot of nuances strictly defining the final price, but basically, it's all stands on time-per-feature basis. I will briefly describe a process from a layman's point of view, corrections are welcome. Also prices in this post are ...


6

I would like to point you to an article by Shamus Young of Twenty Sided on the issue of server population in MMOs: http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=6185 This is one reason. Other's are the overpopulation of MMOs(seriously, do you not see enough ads of MMOs already?) and the strain to provide a lag-free, scalar game that can be improved over ...


5

Ugh. Did I miss an As-Seen-On-TV ad? Any game is a lot of work to make. Not just an MMO. Most console titles take somewhere from 18-30 months and from 30 to 200 people working on it, and that is generally with the basic infrastructure already in place (render engine, content framework, core libraries) and people with background in game development joining ...


5

It varies widely. Ballpark is 8 figures for a big-budget ("AAA") title these days... i.e. 10 to 100 Million (US $). But a lot depends on how you count, and there are tons of exceptions. Here's a good way to guesstimate: 1) How many people on the team? A small team is around 20-30 people, large team would be several hundred. Look at the credits of a few ...


5

My sense is that every party you deal with will have different rules and prices, and that there isn't necessarily an "industry standard" for this. Part of it is the wildly variable value of the IP. An X-wing is part of a huge IP that's worth a lot of money, and thus is going to be costly. The spaceship from Mork & Mindy probably not so much. Then ...


5

As always, it depends. Game art is a very deep field, so in my opinion you should find a well rounded artist partner to help you, instead of hiring people to do do specific jobs. Regarding 2D vs 3D, in fact, as Quacks says, creating a 3D model is much more complex than creating a 2D drawing, and therefore more expensive. However, animating in 2D is ...


4

This is one of those questions where one has to response with another question: That depends on what you want to do. An MMO can be a mega-multi-million dollar production effort that requires vast server farms to run, or it can be a lean clean web based game that runs on a single Amazon S3 instance or uses Google Application Engine. Whatever your approach, ...


4

There is a list of most expensive games and their costs here. Some items from the list: Grand Theft Auto IV - $100 million Gran Turismo 5 - $80 million Shenmue - $70 million Final Fantasy VII - $45 million, plus $100 million marketing Interestingly also on the list are some old games, like Dragon's Lair, costing $1.3 million in 1883.


4

Game development costs are something developers tend to keep pretty close to the vest, so it can be difficult to find examples. In 2009, Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot is quoted as saying the cost for creating a major title for PS3 or Xbox 360 is typically between $20 million and $30 million. Nintendo's Reggie Fils-Aime is quoted as saying costs can be $20 ...


4

The cost is related most intensely to the labor required for developing assets. The cost of most tools pale in comparison to what it costs to pay people to use them and produce assets. Consider that the cost of one fulltime developer can be anywhere between 20k - 100k+. This already equates to very high budgets for normal games, but MMOs require ...


4

Even "simple" indie games take months for a small team to make. This goes into design, programming, art, audio, business, marketing, etc. With MMOs, the complexity is greater -- you need a rock-solid (ideally, exploit-proof) game client and server, plus a billing system, a back-end database that can handle a large number of players, etc. These take time ...


4

The problems with an MMO can be broken down into 4 major groups. All of which can be solved. Or at least reduced somewhat. However, you'll have to sacrifice your personal vision of the game to do it, in most cases. Content There are many ways to solve the Content problem. The obvious one is collecting a ton of talented people and paying them to make the ...


4

Yes, the engine is free for Win/Mac/Web. But if you want to release on Android/iPhone you have to buy some extra license. But I agree with you. It is a bit confusing, because on the download page it says "Free Full Version for Windows with Unity Pro and Android." They don't mention that it is a 30 day trial. At least, that was the case some time ago...



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