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Two possible options might be: "big number" classes, such as this one, which represent arbitrarily large numbers through mathematics on arrays of integers used to simulate an appropriate storage space. hierarchy; that is, using a tiered coordinate system possibly represented by two integers per component; the first integer represents the position of (say) ...


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An int64 is pretty huge (really!), but one way to deal with this sort of a problem is to have one coordinate set define what grid cell you are in (gridx, gridy) then another coordinate set to define the offset within that cell (offsetx, offsety). Note though that if you used 32 bit ints for the grid cell x and y, and 32 bit ints for the offset x and y, you ...


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If i understand correctly, you want to put a random target on the plane. However, your plane bounds.size are the "sides" of the plane, and do not start at the center. What you want to do is something like this: float scale = 0.1f; float moveAreaX = gameObject.GetComponent<Renderer>().bounds.size.x / 2; float moveAreaZ = ...


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While trying to understand the subject I found this great book. It's a dense and complete cheat sheet for all spaces you will possibly deal in 3D. Answering your question: "The purpose of world space is to provide some absolute reference for all the objects in your scene." No, Window is usually a synonym to Viewport. Possibly that you talking about is a ...


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Consider the real world. We have all kinds of things measured in meters and feet. Now how many, say, meters across is your field of view? Clearly, you need to know more about that question to continue. At what distance? Horizontally? Vertically? Even the arrangement of cells on your retina doesn't indicate how much of the world you can see. The same problem ...



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