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42

Yes it is, check this list for a proof. Those are some games made with Java using The Lightweight Java Game Library (LWJGL). It is a low-level framework, which provides OpenGL for high quality graphics and OpenAL for sounds. It also provides input API. With these you can quite easily get started to serious game development in Java. I am currently writing my ...


39

There are a number of reasons why a PC port can take a while. (I apologize if I seem to be repeating myself somewhere; this is sort of written on the fly.) Adapting controls and gameplay When you're playing on a console, this alone puts certain limitations on what you can do, since all the user has is a gamepad. Just creating 1:1 mappings between keyboard ...


35

Not really. Here's the thing- firstly, there's very little in terms of existing libraries for Java compared to the virtually everything that is for C++. Secondly, Java as a language simply doesn't lend itself well to game development- I mean, for example, if you're dealing with GPU buffers then Java does not provide a language feature which will aid you in ...


35

Is that only a matter of code optimization? There is indeed an optimization part in this. The more programmers get used to a console hardware, the more they learn how to squeeze graphical quality into it. But it's far from being the only reason: Early console titles are developed on evolving hardware and SDKs, so it's hard to get the most out of a ...


32

Having a single big file has a few benefits for performance, regardless of platform. Many PC games use big files too. You can manually cache the offset of each file within the big file, to avoid the need to read file system directory entries (which can involve multiple seeks per file opened if you miss the cache). You get full control of the order of the ...


25

There are multiple ways to do this, the simplest would be to XOR the two files and compress them (GZIP or so forth). The theory behind this is that hopefully you can get a large sequence of zeroes (long sequences of the same values compress well). You can take that concept further and try and find areas of the two files where the data is identical and omit ...


22

So, I am really serious about game development, is Java still a viable choice? I have tried multiple times to learn C++, but I don't really like the language. I don't really know why, but usually, whenever I try to learn, I can never grasp the topics. If your reason for choosing Java is that you couldn't understand C++, your Java programs aren't going ...


17

I went to a GDC session this year presented by the guys at sucker punch, discussing how they handled assisted aim and movement for inFamous. My understanding is that Halo uses a very similar system for assisted aiming, and here's the basics: When you hit a button to fire, the shot should always go directly where the reticle is pointing. Otherwise, players ...


14

As long as you have the IP address, you can get an estimate, just like for the PCs.


14

The executable code of a game doesn't always reside just in the executable, often it is divided into several dynamic libraries (for example the game, graphics and sound engines), the actual executable, and possibly many scripts for various purposes. A patch could be fixing issues in any single one of these parts without warranting change in all of them. A ...


14

but XNA was never a real success lolwut? XNA is an amazing success. If you just look at this site as a measuring ground, you will notice that: XNA is the top recent tag (it stays up there quite a lot) XNA questions get quickly answered, often with multiple answers Difficult XNA problems are addressed This shows that there are a lot of people ...


13

An experienced programmer will generally know many programming languages - learning extra programming languages isn't too hard once you know one well. However I would strongly recommend that C++ shouldn't be your first language, and probably not the second one either. That's because C++ gets a lot of its efficiency from not doing any significant runtime ...


12

Turn to MSDN for all your Windows answers! "Games for Windows Technical Requirements: Best Practices for Games on Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7" has a section on Games Explorer Integration. Integration with Games Explorer requires that you author a game definition file (GDF), which is an XML text file that is embedded within a binary file (an ...


11

Do game developers plan to start small on a new hardware, to have space to evolve while creating a series of that game? They most certainly do not! When I first joined the games industry, I asked a producer from [giant publisher you've definitely heard of] this very question. He told me that every console game his company developed used 100% of the ...


10

Pro development is almost unilaterally done in C++. If you're planning on targeting multiple platforms, this is a must since it's the only thing that's supported on every console and OS. Note: if you're new to this, I'd start with something much simpler like XNA - still very, very powerful, but it'll let you focus on your game instead of memory leaks and ...


10

While I can't link you to the actual documents used by "proper" published console games (and, really, unless that's what you're doing, you don't need them), but here are the two documents used for XNA games that go up on Xbox Live Indie Games: The Evil Checklist (things that games fail for) The Not-So-Evil Checklist (additional quality considerations) ...


9

Are you interested in developing for PSN, or as a retail game that people buy in stores? To develop for PSN, you'll need to start by contacting Sony and becoming a licensed developer. To develop a retail game, you'll most likely need to contact a publisher who will distribute the game. In either case, be prepared to demo the game and your company to either ...


9

Nintendo supports developers with their DSiWare and WiiWare for people wanting to make a game downloadable through the console or handheld. The first step is to contact Nintendo to become a licensed developer (http://warioworld.com/). After you've made this important first step then Nintendo will be able to answer all of your questions. Be prepared that ...


9

XNA can deploy to a Windows 7 Phone and Xbox 360.


9

New hardware generally just offers the ability to do more than before. Most graphical improvements come from new techniques, new optimisations, and better art. It's worth knowing that the 'new' techniques that get used are rarely new - they are typically 20 year old techniques that previously were too slow for real-time rendering. These typically get ...


8

There are good answers here. I had to figure it out for myself on the project I'm on, but came to the same conclusions as the Sucker Punch guys (and I had thought I came up with something novel. Baww :( ). I find it useful to consider your entire first person 360x180 degree "panorama" as an "acceleration field". All valid targets create gravity wells which ...


8

Some color data will be lost or changed regardless of your texture format. However, a bigger problem will be gamma correction. Gamma correction can be a tricky subject since your game will not appear visually the same across all display technologies and finding a single solution is not going to be easy. These might help you out: ...


8

Since Consoles pretty much have one specification. And not like PC where you have tons of different variations. Developers can optimize their games better. But this doesn't mean it will do space magic in the long run. It will reach a cap. ( currently the 360/Ps3 have 512 mb in total, which to many developers seems to be an annoyance) Consoles are fairly ...


7

As @AttackingHobo said, the memory is very fast and expensive. Also, you must take into account that these consoles launched years ago, when memory and hardware prices were higher. Another factor that goes into making consoles very performant on what appears to be very limited resources, is that since every console is identical, we as developers can take ...


7

Disclaimer: This doesn't exactly answer your question. However, I have attempted to (briefly) mention some points that may be of interest to you. The reason that you see so much about C++ is because C++ is still the industry standard -- the most common language for consoles, etc. Java is not frequently used. Minecraft is a pretty popular game that made it ...


6

EDIT: After a comment by @ChristianIvicevic I felt compelled to reword my answer to emphasise that the Article link I provided is a far better alternative to using a system call as it is more secure and does not risk producing false positives with anti-virus software. Try and use this Microsoft solution: Performing Clear Screen (CLS) in a Console ...


6

A simple reason is that a console has a single set of hardware that is the same per console. Your XBox, PS3 and Wii all have the same hardware as your neighbours XBox, PS3 and Wii. However your computer has a different CPU, different graphics card, different amount of RAM, in fact the whole configuration and Operating system settings, installed drivers ...


5

You can write your own games from scratch for many of the Nintendo platforms. devkitPro provides devkitARM, which can compile for the Gameboy Advance and the Nintendo DS, as well as devkitPPC, which can compile for the GameCube and the Wii. There are also utility libraries to help you access the hardware. Running your games is very simple on the GBA and ...



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