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As Matt Jens Jensen already pointed out, there is no way to always protect your players privacy without hosting the servers yourself. However, to accommodate more privacy-conscious players you could develop and offer a proxy server application for your game (client connects to proxy, proxy connects to host on their behalf and forwards all network ...


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In any direct peer-to-peer game where one player is the host of the game server, you won't be able to hide players' IPs from the host nor protect the host from the players. However, if you design your game with all players directly connecting to your hosted game servers and only allow packets in your game to be passed between the authoritative server and ...


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There are for sure more that one way to achieve this. I am not familiar with smartfox server's setup to help you on that regard & there is no point on writing about all the possible routes you could take since this topic may result in a huge discussion. No matter what way of networking setup you do you should have to 'simulate' that destruction on the ...


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On the most basic level, if your destruction algorithm is deterministic then the server can notify each client and the result should be the same. The more complicated manner is that this system is notify independent of your other systems. It will probably be best for you to handle destruction in the same way. E.g., if you are calculating ...


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I am guessing that in your case, clients are sending all their shots to the server, and the server is broadcasting them back to clients. Basically, your clients should simulate the physics (animations and sounds as well) based on objective information coming from the server. This data can be differently structured: One approach is sending data about who ...


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In addition to the excellent and compact answer by Giorgio Liggio: is it standard practice to send positions as the synchronized state between a client and server instead of a velocity vector? You send both and use both, they complete each other in a fault-tolerant and stretchful way. In addition, you would send events, like "client just turned his ...


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Would you happen to be using a socket server? Or what kind of networking system Do you use? Having a stream of floats going over the network should not cause an issue, if you use a setting on that rpc like transmission set to "reliable" (if you have this kind of system) that can cause the packet buffer to overflow on the server and cause overhead. if this ...



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